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Mosiah 8:16-21

Home > The Book of Mormon > Mosiah > Chapters 7-10 (7:1-10:22)
Previous page: Chapter 6                      Next page: Chapters 11-19


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Mosiah. The relationship of Chapters 7-10 to the rest of Mosiah is discussed at Mosiah.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 7-10 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 7:18. In the New Testament, the King James Translation uses the word "effectual" most often in conjunction with the word "work" as a translation of the Greek verbs Energeia or Energeo--both signifying power, work, or energy that "effects" some kind of change (cf. Eph 3:7, Eph 4:16). The verb Energeia is only used when describing supernatural spiritual powers (be they good or evil). While we have no idea what original word was used in verse 18, it is possible that in the Biblical lexicon of Joseph Smith, the phrase translated here as 'effectual struggle" similarly means a struggle conducted by supernatural or divine power--as seems to be indicated in the following verse. If so, Limhi is saying that while they have already struggled themselves, they are about to receive supernatural power to aid in that struggle.
  • Mosiah 7:29: Succor. This word appears three times in the King James Version of the Holy Bible (as succour). It appears six times in the Book of Mormon and twice in the Doctrine & Covenants. According to the 1828 Webster's Dictionary, succor (the verb) means "literally, to run to, or run to support; hence, to help or relieve when in difficulty, want or distress; to assist and deliver from suffering; as, to succor a besieged city; to succor prisoners" and as a noun, means "aid; help; assistance; particularly, assistance that relieves and delivers from difficulty, want or distress."
  • Mosiah 7:29: Hedge up. In the KJV of the Old Testament, this phrase only appears once at Hosea 2:6.
  • Mosiah 8:2: Ammon's background. As revealed here, Ammon can read, something uncommon in pre-modern societies. Earlier, we read that he was a descendant of Zarahemla. Presumably, as a royal or noble Mulekite heir, he was taught to read. In addition, his preaching to the people of Limhi the words of king Benjamin may indicate some sort of function as a priest or teacher, though he mysteriously declines to baptize Limhi's people.
  • Mosiah 9:3. The land of a family's first inheritance, the original land that their ancestor received when the land was first divided, was passed down in each generation to the father's primary heir and was thus a symbol of one's status as head of the family.[1] This may relate to Zeniff's zealousness and pride.
  • Mosiah 10:12-13. These verses are important because they provide us with the Lamanite counter narrative of the Lehite exodus recounted in 1 Nephi and 2 Nephi. Notice, that in this counter narrative Lehi is driven from Jerusalem, rather than being instructed to depart by the Lord. Notice also that he leaves because of his unrighteouness rather than because of the unrighteousness of the people that he condemns. (Interestingly, the priests of King Noah make a similar attack on Abinadi, claiming that his denuciations of sin and warnings of imminent destruction run counter to the words of scripture, particularlly the passage in Isaiah regarding the beauty of the feet of those who proclaim peace.) We can see the beginnins of this counter narrative in the disputes between Nephi and his brothers over whether or not the people of Jerusalem were wicked. Nephi says yes, while his brothers insist that they kept the statutes of the law. From this germ grows the Lamanite nation's founding myth as it were.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 7:1: What does it mean to go "up"? Does that mean in elevation, northward, or what?
  • Mosiah 7:1: Is there a difference between the "land" and the "city" of Lehi-Nephi.
  • Mosiah 7:1: What does the word "teasings" mean here?
  • Mosiah 7:2: Why would the king need to "grant" the men to go on the expedition to Lehi-Nephi?
  • Mosiah 7:2: Is there a significance to the number 16, or does this just happen to be the number of men chosen to go?
  • Mosiah 7:3: Who is this Ammon? Did King Mosiah name his own son after this "descendant of Zarahemla"? If so, why? Was Mosiah perhaps married to a high-ranking "descendant of Zarahemla" himself? Perhaps even a relative (daughter or sister) of Ammon? Why was a "descendant of Zarahemla" sent out as a leader of a Nephite expedition? Was he just the leader of this party, or did he have a leadership role within his own people, perhaps as a direct descendant of the previous Mulekite King Zarahemla?
  • Mosiah 7:3: Why would this descendant of Zarahemla have so much interest in the lost group of Nephites who had left Zarahemla 80 years earlier?
  • Mosiah 7:3: Why this renewed interest in finding out what had happened to a people who hadn't been heard from for 80 years?
  • Mosiah 7:4: What is the significance of the men wandering 40 days? How and where else is the phrase "forty days" used in the scriptures? How often is this phrase associated with "wilderness" and mountains or hills?
  • Mosiah 7:4: If the 40 days in the wilderness is meant to parallel Israel's forty years in the wilderness, then the symbolism is curiously reversed because Ammon and his party are not heading toward the promised land, but away from it. If anything the journey resembles a return to Egypt, rather than an Exodus from Egypt. If this is a fruitful interpretation, why is the symbolism reversed?
  • Mosiah 7:4: In the interest of not biasing the interpretation toward Israel's wandering in the desert, what fruitful parallels might be drawn between Ammon's story and that of Moses's forty days on Mount Sinai? Jesus's forty days of fasting? Joshua and company's forty days exploring the promised land before they conquered it? Jonas's preaching that Nineve would be destroyed in forty days? The Philistine's forty days of challenging Israel before David arrived? The forty days of rain during Noah's flood? Elijah's forty day journey (apparently fasting) to get to Mount Horeb and speak with the Lord? Or perhaps even Jacob's being embalmed for forty days?
  • Mosiah 7:4: If we take an historical context to the bible, it is apparent that to many cultures, Jews included, a certain amount of numerology, or the study of the occult meaning of numbers (definition found on dictionary.reference.com), was considered an acceptable, even significant practice. Many modern day Christian churches have the same cultural influence within them, if you look close enough. This may not explain what meaning their is to the numbers, but it may offer a suggestion to the seemingly impossible coincidence that all of these significant biblical events took the almost exact same amount of time. As copies of the bible were handed down and rewritten by hand, this numerological cultural influence may have "inspired" scribes to make some small and seemingly harmless changes to the text, for the greater good of the word, of course. For one who has read the Book of Mormon, we know that the Nephites are a heavily Jewish-influenced society, as Lehi left from Jerusalem, the capitol of Judaism, and was no doubt influenced by its culture. This may explain the showing up of similar numerological passages in the Book of Mormon, as ancient American prophets might have been practicing an ancient tradition, the "rounding" of the time that an event took place within to fit nicely inside the content of the holy texts already in existence. We also know that the Nephites had at least one copy of the bible...
  • Mosiah 7:6: What does it mean that these men were "brethren" of Ammon? Does that mean that they were blood relatives or even brothers, and hence all royal Mulekite descendants of Zarahemla?
  • Mosiah 7:6: If these men are Mulekites, why are they being sent to inquire about lost Nephites?
  • Mosiah 7:6: Why are we given the names of these men, who we never hear from again? Or do we hear about them again, but perhaps haven't recognized it? Is this Amaleki the same man (Amlici--perhaps a variant spelling, see here) who 30 years later becomes the leader of the Amalekites/Amlicites who give Alma so much trouble in the first half of the Book of Alma?
  • Mosiah 7:6: Is there a connection between this Helem and the Helam that Alma baptizes in the Waters of Mormon? Does this similarity of names indicate a blood relationship between the two, or merely some other cultural connection?
  • Mosiah 7:6: What are the parallels between the mission of this Ammon and his three brothers to the Land of Lehi-Nephi and the mission of Ammon (the son of Mosiah) and his three brothers to the Land of Nephi?
  • Mosiah 7:6: What other scriptural or cultural examples do we have of journeys taken by four brothers? What literary or other patterns might be suggested by these stories? Is it significant that the four brothers comprise one fourth of the original group?
  • Mosiah 7:7: Is it a completion of the reverse Exodus symbolism that upon arriving in the land of Nephi, Ammon and his brethren are imprisoned?
  • Mosiah 7:8: Is the imagery of captivity and judgment intended to evoke its usual Gospel connotation? If so, why is it Ammon and his brethren who are imprisoned and judged, rather than Limhi?
  • Mosiah 7:9: Limhi claims to have been "made a king by the voice of the people". Does that imply that he was elected, or does this mean something else? What kind of a king is "made...by the voice of the people"?
  • Mosiah 7:9: Is Limhi's high-handedness to be taken as a contrast to King Benjamin's humble manner of ruling?
  • Mosiah 7:9: Is it significant that Limhi fails to mention the Lord both in regard to his right to rule and his right to the land (which was originally the promised land)?
  • Mosiah 7:10: With such high tensions between the people of Limhi and their Lamanite neighbors/overlords, why would the king be outside the gates of the city?
  • Mosiah 7:11: What does the suspicion and harshness with which Limhi receives Ammon and his brethren tell us about the state of their society?
  • Mosiah 7:12: Given the background of King Benjamin's speech and Mormon's positive remarks about Mosiah's reign, it seems that Limhi's treatment of Ammon and his brethren is something they would not have anticipated from a political ruler. Why does Ammon respond with such courtesy and respect?
  • Mosiah 7:13: In what sense does Ammon use the term "brethren" here? Does he mean just his own Mulekite relatives, or does he mean something else? Do the Mulekites and Nephites consider themselves united and "brethren" at this time?
  • Mosiah 7:14: What does Limhi mean by his own use of the term "brethren"?
  • Mosiah 7:15: Why would Limhi think it better to be a slave to the Nephites than to pay tribute to the Lamanites?
  • Mosiah 7:15: Why does Limhi assume that they will need to be the slaves of the Nephites in advance of any planning or discussion? Does he intend the term literally? Or is he simply (because of cultural norms) acknowledging the rescuer's right to the rescued's person? Or are there other possibilities?
  • Mosiah 7:16: Why stress that Limhi commanded the guards not to bind Ammon and his brethren? Isn't that already obvious from the context? Is this at all related to all of Limhi's talk of captivity in the previous verse?
  • Mosiah 7:16: Is it significant that the others are waiting on a hill?
  • Mosiah 7:16: Why is the suffering mentioned? Is the hunger and thirst meant to be reminiscent of fasting? If so, why?
  • Mosiah 7:17: What is this temple? Is it the same temple originally built by Nephi?
  • Mosiah 7:17: Is the language of this verse intentionally parallel to the language of Mosiah 1:18? If so, why would Mormon intend for us to connect these two events?
  • Mosiah 7:18: What does the word effectual mean? What is Limhi saying when he says "there remaineth an effectual struggle"?
  • Mosiah 7:18: What does it mean to "lift up your heads"? What does this have to do with being comforted?
  • Mosiah 7:20: What does it mean to say that God "brought [Limhi's people] into bondage"? What role did God play in their falling into bondage?
  • Mosiah 7:21: What does it mean that Zeniff "was made king over this people"? How was he selected? What did it mean for him to be a king? Why might he have been so chosen?
  • Mosiah 7:21: What does it mean to be "over-zealous"? In what way was Zeniff "over-zealous"? Why would he be so interested in inheriting the "land of his fathers"?
  • Mosiah 7:25: How does the theme of contentions play out throughout the record of Zeniff?
  • Mosiah 7:26: In most of this chapter, Limhi uses the word God. But here he refers to Abinadi as "a prophet of the Lord". What does this mean? Is this a reference to Abinadi's specific teachings about Christ?
  • Mosiah 7:26: What does it mean for Abinadi to have been "a chosen man of God"? In what sense was he "chosen"?
  • Mosiah 7:27: What reason does Limhi give here for Abinadi's martyrdom? How might his teachings have formed the basis for a capital offense?
  • Mosiah 7:29: What does it mean for the Lord to "not succor [his] people?
  • Mosiah 7:29: How does the Lord "hedge up [the] ways [of his people]"? What does it mean to hedge up?
  • Mosiah 7:29: In what sense do the Nephites understand the term "prosper"? How might this be related to scriptural promises?
  • Mosiah 7:29: How can our doings become a stumbling block?
  • Mosiah 7:30: What does it mean to "reap the chaff thereof in the whirlwind"? Does this mean the chaff of filthiness? What does that even mean?
  • Mosiah 7:30: How is the "effect" of reaping the chaff a "poison"?
  • Mosiah 8:1: Why are "only a few" of Limhi's words recorded here?
  • Mosiah 8:2: Why did Limhi have Ammon recount the history of the people in Zarahemla, if as it says in verse 1, he had already "told his people all the things concerning their bretheren who were in the land of Zarahemla"?
  • Mosiah 8:3: What are "the last words which king Benjamin had taught them"? Does that mean the entire last speech, or just some part of those words?
  • Mosiah 8:3: How did Ammon have the words of king Benjamin? Did he just have these teachings in his mind, or did he have a copy of the speech with him?
  • Mosiah 8:3: What might have been needed by way of explanation, so that the people of Limhi "might understand all the words" of king Benjamin which Ammon was recounting?
  • Mosiah 8:4: Ammon is able to read, something uncommon in most pre-modern societies. What does this tell us about his background and training?
  • Mosiah 8:7: Why are we told that 43 people were sent out to find the land of Zarahemla? Why give us the exact number rather than just say "a small group"?
  • Mosiah 8:8: Since bones do not last long in tropical settings, what does this tell us about how long ago the people had died in these ruined cities?
  • Mosiah 8:8: Why compare the size of the lost people to "the hosts of Israel"?
  • Mosiah 8:8: What does Limhi mean by "the hosts of Israel"?
  • Mosiah 8:11: Metal weapons are almost unheard of in pre-Columbian America. Does this verse indicate the presence of iron weapons?
  • Mosiah 8:11: What would the weapons have been made of that their hilts had perished but their blades "were cankered with rust"?
  • Mosiah 8:12: Why would Limhi be "desirous to know the cause" of the destruction of the lost people?
  • Mosiah 8:13: What do we learn about the role of a seer in this verse?
  • Mosiah 8:13: Why does a seer have to be commanded to look into the interpreters?
  • Mosiah 8:13: What might it mean to "look for that he ought not"? Are there ways that we look for what we ought not in our modern society?
  • Mosiah 8:13: Why might one perish after looking "foro that he ought not"?
  • Mosiah 8:13: Our modern prophets and apostles are sustained as seers. Does this mean that they have access to the same kind of interpreters as king Mosiah? Why don't we hear about modern seers using interpreters?
  • Mosiah 8:14: Why is being a seer called a "high gift from God"
  • Mosiah 8:15: Why would Limhi say "that a seer is greater than a prophet"? What would it mean to be "greater" than a prophet?

Resources[edit]

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  • Mosiah 7:6-10: Bacabs. In Ancient Mesoamerica, there was an important tradition of four divine brothers--known to the Maya as the Bacabs. There were also tales of four brothers as founding fathers of various groups. It is possible that the stories of the two Ammon journeys, each involving four brothers, somehow resonated with these stories of divine brothers. More explorations of this here.
  • Mosiah 7:22: Corn. John L. Sorenson wrote an interesting article on whether or not the Nephites encountered and intermingled with other native american groups upon arriving in the New World. One point he makes is that this early mention of "corn" (repeated in Mosiah 9:9 and 14) is evidence of cultural intermingling because maize is only a domestic plant whose care must be explained to newcomers (think Thanksgiving Story) but that had already become predominant in Nephite culture (as indicated by primary placement in both of these verses). Sorenson, John L. When Lehi's Party Arrived in the Land, Did They Find Others There? Provo, Utah: Maxwell Institute, 1992. Pp. 1-34. Of course, there is an older use of the word "corn" that predates Europeans' introduction to maize.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Nibley, High. An Approach to the Book of Mormon, p. 80-81.

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Mosiah 13:31-35

Home > The Book of Mormon > Mosiah > Chapters 11-19 > Chapters 12b-17 / Verses 12:17-17:20
Previous page: Chapters 11-12a                      Next page: Chapters 18-19


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Summary[edit]

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Story. The first detail we get about Abinadi's interrogation is a question asked of him by King Noah's priests. Abinadi answers with two questions of his own. The remainder of this conversation can be understood as developing the answers to these three questions, plus another that Abinadi raises near the end:

  • Verses 12:17-32: Three initial questions: (1) What is the meaning of Isa 52:7-10 (How beautiful are the feet …)? (2) What do the priests teach? and (3) Does salvation come by the Law of Moses?
  • Verses 12:33-37: Those who keep the Ten Commandments will be saved, but the priests have neither obeyed them nor taught the people to do so.
  • Verses 13:1-10: Abinadi withstands Noah's guards and warns that his own fate will foreshadow King Noah's fate.
  • Verses 13:11-26: The remainder of the Ten Commandments, but the priests have not taught them.
  • Verses 13:27-35: The Law of Moses is a type of Christ, of whom all the prophets have preached.
  • Verses 16:1-15: Christ enables the resurrection and final judgment, so repent and teach that the Law of Moses is a type of Christ through whom comes salvation.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in this passage track closely with the questions posed by Abinadi and the priests, and include:

  • Salvation comes through Christ rather than through obedience to the Law of Moses, which is a type of Christ.
  • Those who obey the Lord's laws are his seed who will be saved. Those who knowingly disobey will suffer wrath.
  • How beautiful are the feet of those who bring that salvation to the Lord's seed.


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Interpretation. More and more, I'm thinking that the question of interpretation is at the heart of what we want to do with Abinadi. I'd like to start here with possible interpretations of the Isaiah quotation cited by the priests. No time to work it out nicely this morning.
  • Mosiah 12:25. It seems that the priests were using Isaiah’s praise here to justify their flattering of the people and their own debauched lifestyle Mosiah 11:7. In contrast, Abinadi has been telling the people that they were sinning and needed to repent (e.g. Mosiah 12:13). In verse 25 Abinadi asks the priests why, since they are the priests, they are looking to Abinadi to explain the scriptures. Then in the next several chapters Abinadi provides his explanation culminating in Mosiah 15:10-14 where he says that those who prophesy of the coming of Lord and remission of sins are those Isaiah is talking about in verse 21.
  • Mosiah 15: Setting of the Discourse. Many readers consider the first verses of this chapter among the most confusing in the Book of Mormon. By way of context, this discourse follows immediately upon Abinadi's full quotation of Isa 53, and should be seen as an explanation of Isaiah's song of the Suffering Servant. In particular, one way to read Abinadi's commentary here of Isa 53:2 (Mosiah 14:2), is to make the following pronouns substitutions: "For he [Christ] shall grow up before him [Elohim] as a tender plant" (see Nyman and Tate, pp. 165-166). In Mosiah 12:21ff, the priests of Noah quoted Isa 52:1ff; then in Mosiah 12:28ff, the priests respond to Abinadi's question about what they are teaching the people by claiming to teach the law of Moses which they later claim brings salvation (Mosiah 12:32). In response, Abinadi chastises the priests for perverting, failing to understand, and not teaching the law of Moses. In Mosiah 12:27ff, Abinadi begins to explain that the priests were wrong for believing that the law of Moses brings salvation. Abinadi's discussion of Isa 53, then, is given in response to this question about the purpose of the law of Moses. In returning to the very passage the priests quoted to Abinadi earlier (or one that was most likely in very close proximity to the one the priests quoted, in whatever scroll or book the priests were reading from), Abinadi shows the priests how they failed to "appl[y] their hearts to understanding" (Mosiah 12:27) by explaining how Isaiah's words should've been (or at least could've been) understood in terms of the Son's crucial role in bringing salvation.
  • Mosiah 15:1. Abinadi's discourse—or really, the whole situation in which Abinadi delivers his discourse—is riddled with direct quotation, something that happens relatively infrequently in the large plates. This verse, as in every other instance of quotation connected with Abinadi, closes off the quotation with a narrative note of return: "And now Abinadi said unto them..." (cf. 12:25, 37; 13:25). In all previous instances, Abinadi turns immediately to comment upon, or at least to refer to, the texts just quoted, and one might be justified in assuming that something quite similar is at work here: Abinadi's words in this chapter would likely best be read as a kind of commentary on Isaiah 53, albeit a rather complex and unsystematic commentary (that is, it is not a verse-by-verse commentary as one commonly finds today).
Perhaps this is confirmed by the phrasing of Abinadi's first words as recorded in this first verse: "I would that ye should understand...." It would appear that Abinadi knew how Isaiah's words would be interpreted, and so his first words of commentary—though they do not amount to direct commentary at all—anticipate a misunderstanding. Indeed, this first verse might be read as Abinadi's laying out his own presuppositions (quite authoritatively): there is a truth, undiscussed in the text in question, through which the text is to be read. Strictly speaking, of course, this is "bad literary technique," but perhaps it lends some credibility to readings of these verses from a post-First-Vision standpoint. At any rate, it is quite clear that Abinadi announces a kind of programmatic reading: Isaiah 53 is here to be read from the standpoint of one who believes in a still-to-come divine redemption, a condescension through which salvation is to come. This presupposition makes all the difference, and it itself deserves careful interpretation.
The presupposition, in short: "God himself shall come down among the children of men, and shall redeem his people." On the surface, this sentence would not have seemed too radical to Israelite ears (cf. Ex 6:6: "I am the LORD, and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will rid you out of their bondage, and I will redeem you with a stretched out arm, and with great judgments"). And yet it is clear that Abinadi expects Noah's priests not to bring this idea to bear on their reading of Isaiah. It would seem, then, that though Abinadi hardly introduces a radical idea in suggesting that "God himself shall come down ... [to] redeem his people," he recognizes that this idea would never be attached to Isaiah 53 in any kind of traditional reading.
  • Mosiah 15:1: Children of Men. This phrase (HEB Ben Adam) occurs only sparingly in most of the Old Testament--only 9 times (Gen 11:5,1 Sam 26:19, 2 Sam 7:14, 1 Kings 8:39, 2 Chronicles 6:30, Proverbs 15:11, Lamendations 3:33, Eze 31:14, Daniel 2:38) outside of the 14 times in Psalms. Its primary use in Psalms may indicate that it perhaps has an unrecognized ritual context. In particular, it occurs in the early Davidic Psalms and four times in Ps 107, presumably written after the Exile for the dedication of the Second Temple, which has the theme "The LORD delivers from trouble".
This phrase is much more common in the Book of Mormon, where it occurs 7 times in 2 Nephi 27, and more especially in King Benjamin's discourse about Christ (Mosiah 3). Its usage here by Abinadi is practically identical to that used at roughly the same time by King Benjamin, where he declares that "For behold, the time cometh, and is not far distant, that with power, the Lord Omnipotent who reigneth, who was, and is from all eternity to all eternity, shall come down from heaven among the children of men, and shall dwell in a tabernacle of clay, and shall go forth amongst men, working mighty miracles" (Mosiah 3:5). Both statements are in turn closely related to Nephi's account of his vision, where he reported that "I looked, and I beheld the Son of God going forth among the children of men" (1 Ne 11:24)
The singular version of this phrase (son of man) is very common in the OT after the exile, occuring 108 times. This phrase is a title for the Messiah/Christ that some scholars such as Margaret Barker believe date to First Temple practices preserved in apocryphal literature such as 1 Enoch that pre-date more extensive usage in the New Testament.
  • Mosiah 15:2: Will of the Father. In the small plates, the Son is referred to as the son of the Father or the son of God in several places: 1 Ne 11:21; 1 Ne 13:40; 2 Ne 25:16, 19; 2 Ne 31:11-14, 18, 21; Jacob 4:5. However, in the large plates, there is only one previous reference to "the Son of God," in Mosiah 3:8, and this is followed by the modifier, "Father of heaven and earth, the Creator of all things," which is similar to the wording here. Even if Nephi thought about the Father and the Son as separate persons, it is not clear whether Abinadi would have had this understanding. Notice also that in a subsequent story, Amulek answers affirmatively when Zeezrom asks, "Is the Son of God the very Eternal Father" in Alma 11:38ff. Later, in 3 Nephi, the Son seems to refer to himself as the Father, or in terms of the Father ("of the Father because of me", 3 Ne 1:14) early on but, after his resurrection, he refers to himself as being "with the Father", in a term that seems to imply distinction, although "in the Father" (3 Ne 9:15).
  • Mosiah 15:21. The name Christ had already been used in 79 verses prior to Mosiah 15. This clarification "for so he shall be called" seems strange here on the 80th usage when considering the context of the Book of Mormon as a single book, but not when considering Abinadi's context.
  • Mosiah 15:27: Cannot deny justice. God cannot save everyone, because to do so would make him a liar and he would cease to be God (see Alma 42:13). God's justice is based on just (true, correct) principles; he has clearly set forth the rules and the punishment for breaking those rules (see Alma 5:21-25). We can only choose to obey them or not. Ultimately, our downfall will be our own doing.
  • Mosiah 16:2-5: Abinadi tells us in verse 3 that because of the fall all mankind is carnal, sensual and devilish. He teaches us in verse 5 that we start out in this state of "carnal nature"—as indicated by the terms persists, goes on, and remaineth. Only by hearkening to the Lord's voice (verse 2) can we be redeemed from that state.
  • Mosiah 16:6: Abinadi notes that he is now speaking about the coming of Christ in the past tense. Is there some significance to this switch? If so, what?

Points to ponder[edit]

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I have a question[edit]

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  • Mosiah 12:21-25: Why do Noah's priest choose to quote this part of Isaiah? How in quoting this part were they hoping to "cross [Abinadi], that therebey they might have herewith to accuse him" (verse 19)? What trap were they laying for Abinadi?
  • Mosiah 14.1: : Chapter breaks in Isaiah. Most modern commentators seem to begin this suffering servant passage with Isa 52:13. What do we know about the history of these chapter breaks in Isaiah as we have received them today? Why might Abinadi not include Isa 52:13-15? How do the different ways of breaking up the chapters in Isaiah affect the interpretation of these passages?
  • Mosiah 15.1: What does it mean for God to "come down"?
  • Mosiah 15.1: What does the plural phrase "chidren of men" mean and how might it be related to the identical (in Hebrew) but singular title "Son of Man" which is later used for Christ?
  • Mosiah 15.1: If Christ comes down "among" the children of men, is that how he attains the title "Son of Man"?
  • Mosiah 15.1: Who are "his people" that God will come down to redeem? What makes them "his"?
  • Mosiah 15.1: Is there a difference between "the children of men" and "his people"?
  • Mosiah 15.3: Here it states that Christ is the Father because He was conceived by the power of God. How does this make Christ more of a father rather than a son if He was begotten of another?
  • Mosiah 15.3: In verse 3 "God" must refer to God the Father--the father of Jesus Christ. Why doesn't Abinadi give God the Father a title that would distinguish him from the many names he is using for Jesus Christ in these verses?
  • Mosiah 15.4: Does the title "the very Eternal Father of heaven and of earth" refer to Christ? If so, why does Abinadi apply this title to him?
  • Mosiah 15.4: With our understanding of the Godhead, this seems like a really complicated way to explain things. Did Abinadi have the same knowledge about the Godhead that we now do? If so, why did he choose this way of explaining things?
  • Mosiah 15.13: The phrase "that has not fallen into transgression," sandwiched between two statements about the prophets, seem out of place. Is it referring to anyone in particular?
  • Suggested answer: Yes, Abinadi is getting ready to turn this all around on the wicked priests. He can't give them any wiggle room.


Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 15. Kathryn Lynard Soper has posted some thoughts on verses 1-11 of this chapter at the T&S blog here.


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.




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D&C 1:36-39

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 1
Previous section: D&C 65                         Next section: D&C 67


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Doctrine & Covenants. The relationship of Section 1 to the Doctrine & Covenants as a whole is discussed at Doctrine & Covenants: Unities.

Audience. D&C 1 is addressed to "ye people of my church" and to "all men" as the Lord's Preface to the Book of his Commandments published to the "inhabitants of the earth" (D&C 1:-2, 6, 11, 34)

Story. D&C 1 is the preface or introduction to the Doctrine & Covenants. D&C 1 consists of five major sections. It opens and closes with statements that the Lord’s word is unstoppable; it will go forth and it will be fulfilled, whether spoken by himself or his servants. In between these two statements, the Lord gives three lists: (1) reasons why the Lord's anger is kindled against the world, (2) reasons why the Lord's servants are to preach these commandments to the world, and (3) reasons why these commandments have been given to his servants.

  • Verses 1:1-10: The Lord’s word will go forth and be fulfilled
  • Verses 1:11-16: The Lord's anger is kindled against the world and wicked will be cut off
  • Verses 1:17-23: The Lord's servants are to preach these commandments to the world
  • Verses 1:24-33: The Lord gave these commandments to his servants
  • Verses 1:34-39: The Lord’s word will be fulfilled

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in D&C 1 include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

  • Received: November 1, 1831 at Hiram, Ohio[1]
  • First section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 65
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 67

The immediate setting of D&C 1 was a conference at Hiram, Ohio attended by ten elders including Joseph Smith. The conference was held on November 1-2, 1831, a year and a half after the organization of the Church. The purpose of the conference was to make plans for publishing Joseph Smith’s revelations for the first time. The conference determined to print several thousand copies of the revelations in book form under the name Book of Commandments. D&C 1 was received on the first day of this conference.[2]

William McLellin later recalled that:

A committee had been appointed to draft a preface [to the Book of Commandments], consisting of himself [William McLellin], [Oliver] Cowdery and [probably] Sidney Rigdon, but when they made their report the conference picked it all to pieces. The conference then requested Joseph to inquire of the Lord about it, and he said that he would if the people would bow in prayer with him. This they did, and Joseph prayed. When they arose, Joseph dictated by the Spirit the Preface found in the book of Doctrine & Covenants [D&C 1] while sitting by a window of the room in which the conference was sitting, and Sidney Rigdon wrote it down.[3]

In Revelation Book 1 the following explanation introduces D&C 1:

A Preface or instructions upon the Book of Commandments which were given of the Lord unto his Church through him who he appointed to this work by the voice of his Saints through the prayer of faith.[4]

From this background we learn that D&C 1 is the Preface or Introduction to the Doctrine & Covenants, the book of the Lord’s commandments to the inhabitants of the earth. It is thus intended to orient the reader to the content and purpose of the entire Doctrine & Covenants.

For a brief overview of D&C 1 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 1:2: The penetrating voice of the Lord. The mention here of the eye, the ear, and the heart is clearly reminiscent of Isa 6:9-10. The question here is, not the prophetic mission of Isaiah, but the "voice of the Lord" Himself. However, if one considers the implications of Isaiah's prophetic call (see the commentary for Isaiah 6 at Isa 6:1ff), there is little apparent difference between the message in this passage and the message there: the "voice of the Lord" in Isaiah 6 is a voice of silence that only becomes spoken when taken into the mouth of the prophet (cf. 2 Ne 32:3, etc.), and something similar seems to be at work here in this revealed preface to the Doctrine and Covenants. Perhaps most significant in the phrasing of this issue as it appears in this verse is the concluding "be penetrated." Whereas "see" and "hear" match up perfectly with Isaiah's wording, "penetrate" is unique here. At the same time, however, it beautifully expresses the same spirit that permeates Isaiah: the violence of "penetrate" matches the (necessary) violence of the message, and the saturation implied in Isaiah's babbling manner of delivering the message is powerfully embodied in "penetrate." In short, the voice comes to all just to penetrate, to find its way to the penetralis, the inner shrine or the Holy of Holies.
  • D&C 1:2: None shall escape. Curiously doubling this is the phrase in the first half of the verse: "there is none to escape." Rather than the more common "there is none that shall not hear," etc., the Lord phrases this concept in terms of escape. Those who hear the voice are without means of escaping, without means of getting out of the hold of this "voice of the Lord." Doubling the penetration, which works its way to the inner recesses of one's person, is a hold (a "cape") out ("es" or "ex") of which none can get, an outward seizure accomplished by the freezing voice of the Lord. It might be well to parallel this hold to the "eye" and "ear" of the second part of the verse: this voice will take hold on the eye and on the ear, will take up a hold that cannot be undone by those thereby held. The voice will come in such complete saturation that those hearing and those seeing will be frozen and held.
Escape seems an interesting word choice here also because it is almost always used in scriptures to describe how the righteous will escape judgment in contrast to the wicked who will not. For example, a righteous remnant is described as escaping the judgment that will befall the wicked majority of Israel (e.g. Isa 37:31-32; 45:20; Jer 44:28; Ezek 6:8-9; see also [[Rom 2:3 for specific mention of escaping judgment and D&C 97:22, 25 for the question-answer form "vengeance cometh speedily upon the ungodly . . . and who shall escape it? . . . Zion shall escape if she observe to do all things whatsover I have commanded her." Thus, the choice of the word escape here which includes the righteous and the wicked, read in light of the more conventional use of the term escape, seems to highlight—by way of analogy with the judgment of the wicked—the violent nature of the heart being penetrated. That is, the conspicuous lack of qualification here for the righteous suggests the violent effect the word of God has on everyone's heart. This seems to echo other scriptural phrase that use violent/dramatic terms for the repentance process, e.g. abase, submit, subject, etc. The lack of qualification for the righteous here also brings the story of Jonah to mind which stands out amongst scriptural texts in that the messenger who tries to escape cannot.
  • D&C 1:16: Idolatry. Idolatry seems only to be mentioned one other time in the Doctrine and Covenants (D&C 52:39), although it is a prominent theme of earlier prophets (see the Bible Dictionary and Topical Guide entries). One reason the otherwise infrequent reference to idolatry may be given here is that in the subsequent verses Joseph's call as a prophet is given and explained. Idolatry then serves as a rhetorical device linking Joseph's prophetic calling to the common theme of idolatry spoken against by many former prophets. Related themes, such as worldliness, riches, vanity, pride, etc. are discussed at length in the Doctrine and Covenants, but in terms other than idolatry per se, thus making the occurrence here notable.
  • D&C 1:18. This verse introduces a most curious moment of divine logic, a moment in which the Lord Himself provides reasons for doing His work. Though other moments in scripture present the Lord offering reasons for a particular action, this might be the only occasion in all of scripture where the Lord simply lays out all the reasons He has for getting a plan of salvation under way, for sending messengers to bring further light and knowledge. The list of reasons is surprisingly long (several verses, at any rate), and all of these reasons present vital points of understanding. Each might be considered in turn.
The first of the Lord's reasons for putting together in the first place a plan of salvation is offered in this first verse, but the anticipatory sense that characterizes the first reason complicates it from the beginning. The first reason, quite clearly, is that "all this" is done so "that it might be fulfilled, which was written by the prophets." The point seems quite clear: the prophets are to be fulfilled, and all of this is to that fulfillment. The Lord gets the work of salvation underway precisely so that the prophets are not ashamed, so that their word is confirmed by historical completion. But then there seems to be some difficulty here, because the next verse goes on as if it were quoted quite specifically the word of the prophets. It must be pointed out--even if a little early here--that verse 19 does not quote any known prophecy. It is closest, perhaps, to 1 Cor 1:27, but there is still something of an important gap between the phrasing of verse 19 and that saying by Paul. All in all, though the prophets are here cited, there does not seem to be any particular saying the Lord has in mind: one is to read verse 19 (and the verses that follow it) as a sort of summary of the prophetic message over all. A first--and a major--consequence: the great majority of the weight of the "reasons" the Lord offers to justify His saving activity in the last days is to be felt in this first mention of things, since the following verses are collectively a sort of explanation of the ancient prophet message. Hence, detailed attention must first be paid to this initiating verse 18.
The difficulty, however, of working out the meaning of verse 18 from the start is that the following verses, precisely because they summarize the prophetic work of so many millennia, seem to be the undergirding of why the Lord would desire to confirm the prophets at all. For present purposes, the work must begin, unfortunately, somewhat blindly.
The question to be asked, then, is this: is the whole plan of salvation, as issued through the Prophet Joseph and according to this "last dispensation," entirely motivated by a desire to confirm the ancient prophets? Or perhaps the question to ask is this: if the Lord feels to undertake a justification of sorts, is He here justifying Himself or the prophets? In the end, however the question is asked, the thrust of the difficulty here is bound up with the intertwined roles of the prophet and his God. One must interpret the relation between God and His messengers from the very beginning. The question is perhaps all the more important in the first part of the twenty-first century, because of the radical reinterpretation of the prophetic role that is underway in biblical criticism. If the prophet has been decided now to be a rather political figure, one attuned to contemporary events and one, hence, without the extra-temporal visions that allow his/her words to transcend her/his age, why on earth or in heaven would the Lord feel to justify words one might quite simply bury in the historical melieux of the past? A necessary answer emerges precisely here: the prophets are being misunderstood if they are completely swallowed up in their own history.
What verse 18, especially as it opens the following few verses, accomplishes is this: God is stripped, as it were, of His absoluteness. One must be careful in stating the point, but it seems quite clear. God is, according to the relativization at work in verse 18, not one to offer absolute reasons for things. The opening of a last dispensation is not simply to bring about "new things," unknown before, but also to hark back to the "former things," to bring the former things out in the new things, just as "Second Isaiah" works out and reinterprets "First Isaiah." In short, if Joseph is a prophet, he cannot--absolutely must not--be separated from the former prophets: the message is the same, and the sender of the messengers is the same. If only a few verses after this, the Lord will quite explicitly introduce the necessity of recognizing the historical context into which the modern prophetic activity falls, He quite explicitly introduces here the necessity of recognizing also that these same prophets transcend their historical context because they are fulfilling ancient prophecies. And with that, the Lord can turn to specifications in the next few verses.
  • D&C 1:18-24: A chiasm. As soon as one turns to the passage in which the Lord lays out His very broad interpretation of what has been prophesied all along, one notices that there is a specific structure at work in these verses:
  • And also gave commandments to others, that they should proclaim these things unto the world;
  • and all this that it might be fulfilled, which was written by the prophets--
  • The weak things of the world shall come forth and break down the mighty and strong ones...
  • But that every man might speak in the name of God the Lord, even the Savior of the world;
  • That faith also might increase in the earth;
  • That mine everlasting covenant might be established;
  • That the fulness of my gospel might be proclaimed by the weak and the simple... before kings and rulers.
  • Behold, I am God and have spoken it; these commandments are of me, and were given unto my servants in their weakness,
  • after the manner of their language, that they might come to understanding.
The chiastic structure highlights the fact that this is the Lord's voice in this revelation, but it also accomplishes a couple of interesting poetic things: verse 21 is set at the center of things, and the whole passage is wrapped about with the Lord's clear statement of purpose. Moreover, the everlasting covenant is set parallel to every man's speaking in the name of God the Lord, which is certainly suggestive. Also, the doubling of the word "commandments" seems to highlight the nature of what the Doctrine and Covenants (perhaps more strictly, the Book of Commandments) is all about. At any rate, the structure opens the possibility of considering the passage as a whole.
  • D&C 1:30: Only true and living church. Although it may be possible to read this as meaning "the only true church" and "the only living church," this reading seems strained because of the fact that the word church is only used once. Instead, a more natural way of reading this phrase seems to be that the church is being described as the only one which is both true and living.

Outline and page map[edit]

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A. Lord’s word will go forth and be fulfilled (1-10)

• Lord's voice will go to all, there is none that shall not hear (1-2)
• the rebellious will be sorrowful for iniquities will become public (3)
• Lord's servants are his voice, so none shall stay them (4-6a)
• this same authority applies to Book of Commandments, so all shall be fulfilled (6b-7)
• Lord's servants have been given power to seal up the wicked unto Second Coming (8-10)
B. Lord's anger is kindled against the world and wicked will be cut off (11-16)
• Lord warns those who will hear to prepare because his anger is kindled against the world (11-13)
• those who will not hear the Lord's voice will be cut off because they: (14)
• have strayed from his ordinances;
• have broken his covenant; and
• seek after idols that will perish when Babylon falls (15-16)
B. Lord's servants to preach these commandments to the world (17-23)
• Lord commands his servants to proclaim these things to the world (17-18a)
• so the weak might break down the strong so that: (18b-19)
• every man might speak in name of Lord rather than counseled by neighbor;
• faith might increase rather than trusting in the arm of flesh; and
• Lord's covenant might be established (19-22)
B. Lord gave these commandments to his servants (24-33)
• Lord gave these commandments to his servants (24)
• so they might come to understanding so that:
• his servants might be instructed, corrected, chastened, and strengthened;
• Joseph Smith might translate the Book of Mormon; and
• his servants might have power to lay the foundation of the Church (25-30)
• but light will be taken from those who repent not (31-33)

A. Lord’s word will be fulfilled (34-39)

• Lord speaks to entire earth and is willing that all should know these things (34-35a)
• the hour is nigh that peace taken from earth and Lord will return in judgment (35b-36)
• search these commandments, for all shall be fulfilled (37)
• whether by Lord's own voice or servants, it is the same (38)
• the Holy Ghost bears record of these truths (39)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • D&C 1 was written down by Sidney Rigdon as it was received during a conference on November 1, 1831. The oldest surviving copy is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 125-27 soon after its receipt.
  • D&C 1 was first published and first received widespread circulation in the March 1833 issue (p. 78) of The Evening and the Morning Star newspaper printed by William Phelps in Jackson County, Missouri.[5]
  • D&C 1 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants as Chapter 1 in the 1833 Book of Commandments, which was also printed by William Phelps during 1833.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 1.

  • D&C 1 was immediately followed by D&C 67 and D&C 68. These three sections comprise a group that were all received during the first conference called to consider publishing Joseph Smith's revelations. These sections address the content and truthfulness of the revelations contained in the Doctrine & Covenants. In contrast, D&C 69 and D&C 70, which were received at another conference later that month, address the mechanics of getting the revelations published.
  • D&C 1 was followed two days later by D&C 133. These two sections are the bookends of the Doctrine & Covenants. D&C 1 appears at the beginning as a Preface, while D&C 133 was placed at the end as an Appendix. Both sections quote many of the same Bible passages.

Parallel passages.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

  • Kelly, William H. Interview with William McLellin, 13 September 1881. In "Letter from Elder W.H. Kelly." In The Saints’ Herald (1 March 1882) Vol. 29 / No. 5, p.66-68. Plano, Illinois, Lamoni, Iowa and Independence, Missouri: Reorganized Church of Latter-day Saints (now Community of Christ), 1860-present.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Revelation Book 1, p.125
  2. Minute Book 2 (1 Nov 1831), p.15-16
  3. Kelly, Interview with William McLellin.
  4. Revelation Book 1, p.125
  5. "Revelations." In The Evening and the Morning Star, original series (March 1833) Vol. 1 / No. 10, p. 78.

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D&C 20:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:17-37
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:17-37 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:17-37 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:17: Unchangeable. Is this verse saying that our particular Father in Heaven has always been the "same unchangeable God" for us and that no one has ever substituted for him? Why do we believe that once someone becomes perfect, like God, they no longer need to grow, change, or progress?
  • D&C 20:17: Framer. Do we believe that nothing on this planet or in the cosmos is manmade? Or does Alma 11:44 restriction our interpretation by suggesting that God created archetypical patterns for all living things and that these people and creatures will be restored more or less to their original pattern?
  • D&C 20:17: All things which are in them. Why does this verse depart from the phrasing in the Book of Mormon that always occurs as "all things that in them are" or "all things which in them are"? Is this verse evidence of how a scribe or someone else tried to clean up what they thought was improper grammar in the scriptures?
  • D&C 20:32: What does it mean to be in a state of grace--such that it makes sense to say "there is a possibility that man may fall from grace"?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:1-16                      Next page: Verses 20:38-67

D&C 20:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:17-37
Previous page: Verses 20:1-16                      Next page: Verses 20:38-67


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:17-37 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:17-37 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:17: Unchangeable. Is this verse saying that our particular Father in Heaven has always been the "same unchangeable God" for us and that no one has ever substituted for him? Why do we believe that once someone becomes perfect, like God, they no longer need to grow, change, or progress?
  • D&C 20:17: Framer. Do we believe that nothing on this planet or in the cosmos is manmade? Or does Alma 11:44 restriction our interpretation by suggesting that God created archetypical patterns for all living things and that these people and creatures will be restored more or less to their original pattern?
  • D&C 20:17: All things which are in them. Why does this verse depart from the phrasing in the Book of Mormon that always occurs as "all things that in them are" or "all things which in them are"? Is this verse evidence of how a scribe or someone else tried to clean up what they thought was improper grammar in the scriptures?
  • D&C 20:32: What does it mean to be in a state of grace--such that it makes sense to say "there is a possibility that man may fall from grace"?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 21:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 21 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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  • What does the phrase "gates of hell" mean? Why the reference to gates?

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 21:6-12

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For a brief overview of D&C 21 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • What does the phrase "gates of hell" mean? Why the reference to gates?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

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Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 20                         Next section: D&C 22

D&C 43:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 43 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 43:6-10

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For a brief overview of D&C 43 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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  • D&C 43 was first published in __.
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Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 43.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 42                         Next section: D&C 44

D&C 68:1-5

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Story. Section 68 consists of three distinct blocks of material:

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For a brief overview of D&C 68 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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  • D&C 68:10. Signs are said to follow those that believe here. In the next verse, 11, the "signs of the times" are mentioned. How should these two verses be read in light of each other? What is the relationship between signs of those that believe and the signs of the times? Is the believer a type of "the Son of Man" (v. 11)? If so, how does this affect the way we read the surrounding verses? If not, how else might this be read?
  • D&C 68:25. Why is this verse qualified with the phrase "as parents have children in Zion, or in any of her stakes which are organized"?
  • D&C 68:26. Would this verse mean the same thing if command were substituted for law?
  • D&C 68:26. This law seems to be directed at Zion and her stakes. What are the implications of this law for the stakes in Zion? What does it mean for a stake to put the sin of the child on the heads of the parents in these cases where the child hasn't been properly taught?

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Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 68.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 67                         Next section: D&C 133

D&C 107:91-95

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107


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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

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Notes[edit]

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Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

A of F 1:6-10

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > The Articles of Faith

Subpages: AF 1AF 2AF 3AF 4AF 5AF 6AF 7AF 8AF 9AF 10AF 11AF 12AF 13

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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