Mosiah 11-19

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Home > The Book of Mormon > Mosiah > Chapters 11-19

Subpages: Chapters 11-12a  •  12b-17  •  18-19

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Mosiah. The relationship of Chapters 11-19 to the rest of Mosiah is discussed at Mosiah.

Story. Chapters 11-19 of Mosiah, the central "King Noah" chapters, tell the story of king Noah's reign:

  • Chapter 11: King Noah's wickedness and Abinadi's warning that the people must repent or be brought into captivity
  • Chapter 12a: Two years later Abinadi again prophecies that the people will be brought into captivity, and they deliver him to King Noah
  • Chapters 12b-16: King Noah's priests interrogate Abinadi. He accuses them of not living or teaching the Law of Moses, explains that the Law of Moses is a type of Christ, and explains Isaiah 52:7-10; 53:1-12.
  • Chapter 17: Three days later Abinadi is sentenced to death and Alma is converted
  • Chapter 19: Abinadi's prophecies are fulfilled that Noah would die by fire and that the people would be brought into captivity

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 11-19 include:

  • King Noah's people must repent or suffer at the hands of the Lamanites.
  • The manner in which King Noah treats Abiniadi will be a sign of King Noah's own fate.
  • What is meant by the phrase "How beautiful are the feet ..."
  • Noah's priests are supposed to keep the Law of Moses and teach the people to do so.
  • The Law of Moses is a type of Christ, whose atonement enables the plan of salvation.
  • In addition, the concluding "Mosiah" chapters of the book refer back to these "Noah" chapters to make the point that a wicked king can lead his people to destruction.

Discussion[edit]

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Notes[edit]

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