Alma 20:1-22:26

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Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 17-25 > Chapters 20-22a / Verses 20:1-22:26
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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Chapters 17-25. The relationship of Chapters 20-22a to the rest of Chapters 17-25 is discussed at Chapters 17-25.

Story. Chapters 20-22a consists of ____ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 20-22a include:

Discussion[edit]

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  • Alma 20:2: Brothers. In verse 20:2 the Lord says to Ammon that his "brother Aaron, and also Muloki and Ammah are in prison." This suggests that Muloki and Ammah weren't literal brothers of Ammon but rather two of the other people the sons of Mosiah selected to travel with them (see Alma 17:8). Otherwise we might expect this to be written as "thy brothers Aaron, Muloki and Ammah are in prison." In the next verse when Ammon tells Lamoni about these three in prison, he says "my brother and brethren are in prison." Again this is an odd way of referring to all 3 if all 3 were his brothers. It seems that by saying brother Alma is referring to Aaron and by saying brethren he is referring to Muloki and Ammah. This helps explain Alma 26:1 where Ammon starts by addressing his audience as "My brothers and my brethren." Ammon uses brothers to refer to his literal brothers but brethren to refer to brothers in the church.
  • Alma 22:23: Minister. Minister generally means to attend to the needs of. See the definition in Webster's 1828 dictionary. Note how the word is used in Matt 25:44. As minister is used in this verse, it seems from the context that it refers to the king explaining the gospel.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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  • Alma 20:17. In verse 20:17 Ammon tells the King of all the land, King Lamoni's father, that were he to die right now when he is in anger (and about to kill his innocent son) that his soul could not be saved. We see later that this King does not kill his son and that he does repent. But since when he lives he does repent, why wouldn't he have had the same opportunity to repent were he to die?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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