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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


1 Tim 2:1-5

Home > The New Testament > First Timothy


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Historical setting[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

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Chapter 1: Teach correct doctrine: Moses and Christ[edit]

  • 1 Tim 1:4: Edifying. Although the Greek word oikodomia means "edifying," most scholars now agree that the textual evidence supports oikonomia which comes from the Greek word for steward and means "management of a household." The contrast here between questions (or "speculations") and godly management of the household "which is in faith" (cf. "household of faith" in Gal 6:10 and D&C 121:45) suggests an emphasis on the love (cf. v. 5), service and obedience-with-faith aspects of a teacher's call, which will "manage" or guide the doctrinal-exposition aspect of his call. Also, Paul may be suggesting that the false doctrines he is referring to are false precisely because they are divorced from true faith and charity. See also the lexical note for 1 Cor 9:17 where Paul describes that which has been entrusted unto him (i.e. his calling) as a oikonomia.
  • 1 Tim 1:6: Vain jangling. This word pair comes from the compound Greek word mataiologos, from the roots mataios meaning "vain" and lego meaning "to say." The idea here of the "vain speaking" seems to reiterate the "swerving" and "turning aside" of the false teachers: rather than teaching how the "end of the commandment is charity" (v. 5), it seems the false teachers' words are useless because they do not elucidate what is the central purpose of the law (charity).
  • 1 Tim 1:9: Made. The Greek word keimai (made) means "to lie down or to be laid down." In Greek, this construction is used to describe how a law is established (i.e. a law is put or laid in place). The usage in Rev 4:2 is used to discuss how a throne is established which has an interesting relationship to the "unsubjected" (disobedient) description of those for whom the law was established.
  • 1 Tim 1:9: Disobedient. The Greek word anupotaktos (disobedient) means "unsubjected." The idea here may be that those who do not allow themselves to be in the subjugation/stewardship of God's household (see the note on "godly edifying" in v. 4) are the ones who need to be subjected to law.

Chapter 2-3a / Verses 2:1-3:13: Church administration[edit]

  • 1 Tim 2:2: Quiet and peaceable. The Greek words eremos (quiet) and hesuchios (peaceable) may seem to be contrasting the noisy strife described in chapter 1 (e.g. "endless geneaologies" in v. 4, "vain jangling" in v. 6, "murderers" and "manslayers" in v. 9, etc.). Although the origin and meaning of the word eremos is somewhat uncertain, hesuchios is from the same root word translated "silence" in 2:11-12.

Chapter 3b-4 / Verses 3:14-4:16: Personal declarations, teach correct doctrine[edit]

  • 1 Tim 4:12. Timothy is told to be an example of the believers in word and in conversation. At first, it appears that this is redundant. But the footnotes suggest that the Greek rendered here as conversation, might also be understood to mean conduct or behavior. We need to be examples of the believer in word and in behavior--no redundancy after all.

Chapter 5: Church administration[edit]

  • 1 Tim 5:9: Taken into the number. This phrase, rendered elsewhere as "enrolled" or "put on the list" - does this indicate an accounting of widows to be cared for or a type of female presbytery specific to that time?

Chapter 6: Teach correct doctrine: riches[edit]

  • 1 Tim 6:3: Wholesome. The Greek word hugiaino (wholesome) means "healthy." The same word was used in 1:10 to refer to "sound doctrine" (healthy teaching) which was described as contrary to various sinners. Throughout the Pastoral Epistles the notion of sound doctrine and righteous living seem closely bound together. The connotation here also seems to be that "wholesome words" are teachings which focus on, or at least include, praxis.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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A. Teach correct doctrine: Moses and Christ (Chapter 1)

• greeting from Paul to Timothy (1:1-2)
a. see that correct doctrine is taught, some teach ignorantly (1:3-7)
b. the Mosaic Law provides guidance to the wicked (1:8-11)
b. the grace of Christ saves sinners (1:12-17)
a. see that correct doctrine is taught, some teach blasphemy (1:18-20)
B. Church administration (Chapter 2-3a)
a. pray for rulers so that we may live peaceable godly lives (2:1-8)
b. conduct of women (2:9-15)
c. calling of a bishop (3:1-7)
c. calling of a deacon (3:8-13)
C. Personal declarations, teach correct doctrine (Chapter 3b-4)
a. I hope to come soon, until then teach Christ (3:14-16)
b. I prophesy that some will teach false doctrines (4:1-5)
b. minister to the brethren in correct doctrine (4:6-11)
a. until I come, take heed also to yourself and be an example (4:12-16)

B. Church administration (Chapter 5)

b. treatment of old widows (5:1-10)
b. treatment of young widows (5:11-16)
c. public visibility of elders, church discipline, temperance (5:17-25)
a. servants obey masters so the name of God will be held in regard (6:1-2)

A. Teach correct doctrine: riches (Chapter 6)

a. teach correct doctrine, withdraw from those who do not (6:3-5)
b. contentment, not riches, is gain (6:6-10)
b. follow after righteousness, not the love of riches (6:11-16)
a. teach the rich to be rich in good works, some are not (6:17-21a)
• farewell (6:21b)

Points to ponder[edit]

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I have a question[edit]

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Resources[edit]

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Translations[edit]

These are still pointed at Matthew

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in 1 Timothy. This list is complete:[1]

  • 1 Tim 1:1
  • 1 Tim 2:4-5, 12, 15
  • 1 Tim 3:8, 15-16
  • 1 Tim 4:2
  • 1 Tim 5:10, 23-25
  • 1 Tim 6:15-16

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 289-90.


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D&C 58:21-25

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Summary[edit]

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 57
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 59
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 58 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 58:6-9. In verse 6 the Lord says that the purpose for them (those gathered in Jackson County Missouri) to be sent (we assume that what is meant here is sent to Jackson County Missouri) is so that they can be obedient and be prepared to bear testimony of things which are to come. From this, we might ask, "what are they to bear testimony of?" or in other words, "what is to come?"
At first we might interpret verse 8 as an answer to this question. There the Lord prophecies that there will be a feast of the fat thing for the poor. Then in verse 9 the Lord explains that this is to be "a supper of the house of the Lord . . . unto which all nations shall be invited." But verse 11 tells us that this feast is not the end in itself that we should be looking forward to. This feast is prepared "for the great day." We interpret this great day to be the second coming. In other words, the Saints are to testify of the fact that the second coming is on its way.
If we think of this feast in contrast to the famine that Amos prophecies about in Amos 8:11, then just as that was a famine for the words of the Lord, we can interpret this as a feast upon the words of the Lord.
Verse 9 tells us that "all nations shall be invited." But verses 10 & 11 tell us that not everyone is to be invited at that the same time. First the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble are invited. Then the poor.
Compare this with Luke 14:12-14. There the Lord tells the lawyers and Pharisees that when they throw a feast they ought not to invite the rich. Rather they should invite the poor, maimed and blind.
Compare also Luke 14:16-24. In that parable of a feast, the poor, the maimed, the halt and the blind are also invited after the guests of priviledge. And there it specifically tells us that those that were invited first, made excuses and did not come to the feast.
One could ask why it it is that the day the Lord invites the poor is what he calls the day of his power. Why not choose the day he first invites the rich as the day of his power? One possible answer is that the Lord may be implying that just like in the parable in Luke 14:16-24, the people he invites first reject the invitation. The day of the Lord's power would be identified then as the day when the Lord has triumphed.
  • D&C 58:8: Feast of fat things. This phrase also occurs in Isa 25:6. Interestingly, the modifying phrase "might be prepared for the poor" does not occur there. This modifying phrase might be read as a check against reading Isaiah as supporting, say, unchecked capitalist consumerism.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 58:2. What is meant here by keeping the commandments "in death"? Does it mean something like accepting the gospel when you are dead? Or is it refers to someone who keeps the commandments and pays for this with their own life?
  • D&C 58:10. Why are the rich, learned, wise and noble invited first? Is the Lord saying that this is who he invites first? Or, is he saying that this is who we should invite first? --Is this meant to be prescriptive? In other words, if we apply this scripture to today, if we are missionaries opening up a new city, should we teach first the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble before we go to teach the poor?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 58 is __.
  • D&C 58 was first published in __.
  • D&C 58 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 58:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 58.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Verse 8[edit]

  • "Feast of fat things." See this post by Rosalynde at the T&S blog for thoughts on Christmas, consumerism and (extreme) Puritanism, as it relates to the phrase "feast of fat things."

Verses 26-27[edit]

  • M. Russell Ballard, "O Be Wise," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 17–20. Elder Ballard encourages members of the church to be innovative in their callings. "Because the eternal principle of agency gives us the freedom to choose and think for ourselves, we should become increasingly able to solve problems. We may make the occasional mistake, but as long as we are following gospel principles and guidelines, we can learn from those mistakes and become more understanding of others and more effective in serving them."

Verse 42[edit]

"Choose to believe in the Atonement of Jesus Christ. Accept the Savior's forgiveness, and then forgive yourself. Because of His sacrifice for you, He has the power to 'remember [your sins] no more.' You must do likewise."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 57                         Next section: D&C 59

D&C 58:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 58
Previous section: D&C 57                         Next section: D&C 59


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 57
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 59
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 58 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 58:6-9. In verse 6 the Lord says that the purpose for them (those gathered in Jackson County Missouri) to be sent (we assume that what is meant here is sent to Jackson County Missouri) is so that they can be obedient and be prepared to bear testimony of things which are to come. From this, we might ask, "what are they to bear testimony of?" or in other words, "what is to come?"
At first we might interpret verse 8 as an answer to this question. There the Lord prophecies that there will be a feast of the fat thing for the poor. Then in verse 9 the Lord explains that this is to be "a supper of the house of the Lord . . . unto which all nations shall be invited." But verse 11 tells us that this feast is not the end in itself that we should be looking forward to. This feast is prepared "for the great day." We interpret this great day to be the second coming. In other words, the Saints are to testify of the fact that the second coming is on its way.
If we think of this feast in contrast to the famine that Amos prophecies about in Amos 8:11, then just as that was a famine for the words of the Lord, we can interpret this as a feast upon the words of the Lord.
Verse 9 tells us that "all nations shall be invited." But verses 10 & 11 tell us that not everyone is to be invited at that the same time. First the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble are invited. Then the poor.
Compare this with Luke 14:12-14. There the Lord tells the lawyers and Pharisees that when they throw a feast they ought not to invite the rich. Rather they should invite the poor, maimed and blind.
Compare also Luke 14:16-24. In that parable of a feast, the poor, the maimed, the halt and the blind are also invited after the guests of priviledge. And there it specifically tells us that those that were invited first, made excuses and did not come to the feast.
One could ask why it it is that the day the Lord invites the poor is what he calls the day of his power. Why not choose the day he first invites the rich as the day of his power? One possible answer is that the Lord may be implying that just like in the parable in Luke 14:16-24, the people he invites first reject the invitation. The day of the Lord's power would be identified then as the day when the Lord has triumphed.
  • D&C 58:8: Feast of fat things. This phrase also occurs in Isa 25:6. Interestingly, the modifying phrase "might be prepared for the poor" does not occur there. This modifying phrase might be read as a check against reading Isaiah as supporting, say, unchecked capitalist consumerism.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 58:2. What is meant here by keeping the commandments "in death"? Does it mean something like accepting the gospel when you are dead? Or is it refers to someone who keeps the commandments and pays for this with their own life?
  • D&C 58:10. Why are the rich, learned, wise and noble invited first? Is the Lord saying that this is who he invites first? Or, is he saying that this is who we should invite first? --Is this meant to be prescriptive? In other words, if we apply this scripture to today, if we are missionaries opening up a new city, should we teach first the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble before we go to teach the poor?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 58 is __.
  • D&C 58 was first published in __.
  • D&C 58 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 58:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 58.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Verse 8[edit]

  • "Feast of fat things." See this post by Rosalynde at the T&S blog for thoughts on Christmas, consumerism and (extreme) Puritanism, as it relates to the phrase "feast of fat things."

Verses 26-27[edit]

  • M. Russell Ballard, "O Be Wise," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 17–20. Elder Ballard encourages members of the church to be innovative in their callings. "Because the eternal principle of agency gives us the freedom to choose and think for ourselves, we should become increasingly able to solve problems. We may make the occasional mistake, but as long as we are following gospel principles and guidelines, we can learn from those mistakes and become more understanding of others and more effective in serving them."

Verse 42[edit]

"Choose to believe in the Atonement of Jesus Christ. Accept the Savior's forgiveness, and then forgive yourself. Because of His sacrifice for you, He has the power to 'remember [your sins] no more.' You must do likewise."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 57                         Next section: D&C 59

D&C 98:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 98 > Verses 98:1-10
Previous page: Section 98                      Next page: Verses 98:11-22


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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 98. After suffering extreme persecutions in Missouri, the Lord gives this remarkable revelation to the Saints providing guidance on matters of civil government as well as personal and national defense. The standards set out here are peculiar and seem to stand in sharp contrast to the standards of the world, providing both challenges and opportunities for Latter-day Saints.
  • D&C 98:1. The Lord starts by calling the Saints his friends, telling them not to be afraid, and offering them peace. Peace is the main theme of this revelation--how to obtain and maintain it. It is fitting that the revelations starts out with the Lord offering peace to his friends, reminding us that peace is a gift from God. As a gift from God, receipt of peace is conditional upon obedience to certain principles (cf. D&C 130:21). Section 98 outlines the principles we need to follow to obtain peace.
One of the first things we are to do to maintain peace after it is given to us, is to maintain a spirit of rejoicing and thanksgiving "evermore". By concentrating on the gifts we have been given from the Lord, our minds and hearts can be settled and we can maintain the peace that we have been given.
  • D&C 98:2. We are told that we should wait patiently, even when we might be suffering, if we are to maintain peace in our hearts. We need to have faith that even though things may look bleak, our "prayers have entered into the ears of the Lord".
  • D&C 98:3. The Lord promises to fulfill his promises to us, so that no matter how difficult our situation may appear, we can have faith in what he has promised us—and rejoice and give thanks for it. Not only will he fulfill his words to us, but he will take the afflictions that we bear, and make them "work together for [our] good."
  • D&C 98:4. Here the Lord outlines his standard for good laws and government. Apparently, it is most important to the Lord that people be able to "do all things whatsoever [he] commands them."
  • D&C 98:5. After declaring that his primary concern is that people be able to obey him, the Lord here decrees that any constitutional law that allows people to be able to fully obey the Lord "belongs to all mankind, and is justifiable." Sometimes, we may be tempted to read this as stating that all constitutional laws are justifiable, but that isn't what this verse says. It clearly states that only constitutional laws that allow people to freely obey God are justified.
  • D&C 98:7. Having declared constitutional laws that uphold our ability to obey the Lord as the only ones that are justifiable, here the Lord goes further in stating that any law that does more or less than this "cometh of evil." While it might seem apparent that any law that doesn't uphold this freedom would be less than justifiable, it may be harder to determine how a law might not be justifiable if it does "more...than this."
  • D&C 98:8. The Lord shows us here that while we are created to be free, it is the exercise of just laws that helps maintain our freedom. We are not radically free to do whatever we wish, but need to obey laws that sustain the ability of all to be free.
  • D&C 98:9-10. In continuing his revelation of peaceful government and self defense, the Lord uses these verses to outline the importance of choosing righteous leaders.
  • D&C 98:9. Here the Lord repeats the counsel from Prov 29:2 about wicked rulers. In order to maintain peace, it is important to avoid wicked rulers.
  • D&C 98:10. In order to avoid wicked rulers, here the Lord counsels us to choose rulers that are honest and wise. The Lord does not put a higher standard of righteousness here on the ruler, only specifying that a ruler be honest and wise. We are to "uphold" or sustain our honest and wise rulers, but reminded that any ruler that is not honest and wise, or anyone who does not support honest and wise rulers "cometh of evil".
This standard of honesty and wisdom seems to fly in the face of the normal standards, even within "enlightened" democratic societies, where we expect our leaders to be politicians and to dissemble the truth in order to obtain and maintain office. Modern electoral politics often emphasizes political party loyalty and promises of political favors, neither of which are supported here by the Lord, who clearly states that standards above or below those of honesty and wisdom "cometh of evil".

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 98:1. Why shouldn't Latter-day Saints be afraid of our enemies? What application might this have for Saints living in a world filled with wars and terrorism?
  • D&C 98:2. Why shouldn't Latter-day Saints be afraid of our enemies? What application might this have for Saints living in a world filled with wars and terrorism?
  • D&C 98:4-5. How can we judge whether a law is justifiable before the Lord? Are there constitutional laws that are not justifiable?
  • D&C 98:7. How might a law fail to be justified by seeking to do more or less than the Lord desires?
  • D&C 98:10. How does the Lord's standard of "honest and wise" differ from modern political standards for elected leaders?
  • D&C 98:10. How might a failure to personally uphold "honest and wise" leaders come of evil?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




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D&C 98:6-10

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  • D&C 98. After suffering extreme persecutions in Missouri, the Lord gives this remarkable revelation to the Saints providing guidance on matters of civil government as well as personal and national defense. The standards set out here are peculiar and seem to stand in sharp contrast to the standards of the world, providing both challenges and opportunities for Latter-day Saints.
  • D&C 98:1. The Lord starts by calling the Saints his friends, telling them not to be afraid, and offering them peace. Peace is the main theme of this revelation--how to obtain and maintain it. It is fitting that the revelations starts out with the Lord offering peace to his friends, reminding us that peace is a gift from God. As a gift from God, receipt of peace is conditional upon obedience to certain principles (cf. D&C 130:21). Section 98 outlines the principles we need to follow to obtain peace.
One of the first things we are to do to maintain peace after it is given to us, is to maintain a spirit of rejoicing and thanksgiving "evermore". By concentrating on the gifts we have been given from the Lord, our minds and hearts can be settled and we can maintain the peace that we have been given.
  • D&C 98:2. We are told that we should wait patiently, even when we might be suffering, if we are to maintain peace in our hearts. We need to have faith that even though things may look bleak, our "prayers have entered into the ears of the Lord".
  • D&C 98:3. The Lord promises to fulfill his promises to us, so that no matter how difficult our situation may appear, we can have faith in what he has promised us—and rejoice and give thanks for it. Not only will he fulfill his words to us, but he will take the afflictions that we bear, and make them "work together for [our] good."
  • D&C 98:4. Here the Lord outlines his standard for good laws and government. Apparently, it is most important to the Lord that people be able to "do all things whatsoever [he] commands them."
  • D&C 98:5. After declaring that his primary concern is that people be able to obey him, the Lord here decrees that any constitutional law that allows people to be able to fully obey the Lord "belongs to all mankind, and is justifiable." Sometimes, we may be tempted to read this as stating that all constitutional laws are justifiable, but that isn't what this verse says. It clearly states that only constitutional laws that allow people to freely obey God are justified.
  • D&C 98:7. Having declared constitutional laws that uphold our ability to obey the Lord as the only ones that are justifiable, here the Lord goes further in stating that any law that does more or less than this "cometh of evil." While it might seem apparent that any law that doesn't uphold this freedom would be less than justifiable, it may be harder to determine how a law might not be justifiable if it does "more...than this."
  • D&C 98:8. The Lord shows us here that while we are created to be free, it is the exercise of just laws that helps maintain our freedom. We are not radically free to do whatever we wish, but need to obey laws that sustain the ability of all to be free.
  • D&C 98:9-10. In continuing his revelation of peaceful government and self defense, the Lord uses these verses to outline the importance of choosing righteous leaders.
  • D&C 98:9. Here the Lord repeats the counsel from Prov 29:2 about wicked rulers. In order to maintain peace, it is important to avoid wicked rulers.
  • D&C 98:10. In order to avoid wicked rulers, here the Lord counsels us to choose rulers that are honest and wise. The Lord does not put a higher standard of righteousness here on the ruler, only specifying that a ruler be honest and wise. We are to "uphold" or sustain our honest and wise rulers, but reminded that any ruler that is not honest and wise, or anyone who does not support honest and wise rulers "cometh of evil".
This standard of honesty and wisdom seems to fly in the face of the normal standards, even within "enlightened" democratic societies, where we expect our leaders to be politicians and to dissemble the truth in order to obtain and maintain office. Modern electoral politics often emphasizes political party loyalty and promises of political favors, neither of which are supported here by the Lord, who clearly states that standards above or below those of honesty and wisdom "cometh of evil".

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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  • D&C 98:1. Why shouldn't Latter-day Saints be afraid of our enemies? What application might this have for Saints living in a world filled with wars and terrorism?
  • D&C 98:2. Why shouldn't Latter-day Saints be afraid of our enemies? What application might this have for Saints living in a world filled with wars and terrorism?
  • D&C 98:4-5. How can we judge whether a law is justifiable before the Lord? Are there constitutional laws that are not justifiable?
  • D&C 98:7. How might a law fail to be justified by seeking to do more or less than the Lord desires?
  • D&C 98:10. How does the Lord's standard of "honest and wise" differ from modern political standards for elected leaders?
  • D&C 98:10. How might a failure to personally uphold "honest and wise" leaders come of evil?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




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D&C 134:1-5

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 134: Mediating with man and with God. Section 134 addresses the relationships between church, state, and man. One framework for understanding these relationships is to see the church as mediating the relationship between man and God, and the state as mediating the relationship between man and man (and lawyers as mediating between man and the state, and doctors as standing between man and death).
  • D&C 134: Church, state, and agency. Among the relationships addressed in D&C 134 is the relationship between church and state. One framework for understanding that relationship is to see these two institutions as each protecting a different aspect of agency. Given the importance of agency to the Father's plan (see this discussion at Matt 5:48), it can be expected that institutions that protect agency will themselves be important to the Father's plan. The relationship of church and state to agency becomes clear when agency is understood in terms of principles of action.
Principles of action: beliefs, desires, and abilities, or head, heart, and hands. Lectures on Faith begins with the statement that faith is a principle of action. (Lectures on Faith 1.11). The argument is that you would never act by planting seeds in the spring unless you had faith, or believed, that you would be able to harvest your crops in the fall. Thinking in terms of principles of action, or of necessary conditions for deliberate behavior, suggests that there are three principles of action: belief (head), desire (heart), and ability (hands). When all three necessary conditions are satisfied, the result is deliberate behavior, When any of the three principles is unsatisfied, such behavior does not result.
For example, imagine that you are 13 years old. It is a hot August afternoon. Your neighbor offers to hire you to mow his lawn before guests begin arriving at his house that evening. Imagine further that he offers to pay you a million dollars. Do you mow the lawn? No. Why not? Because you do not believe that he really intends to pay you a million dollars and therefore doubt whether he will pay you at all. In this example the obstacle to action is with what you believe - or think, know, have faith, are convinced, expect, suppose, assume, or have some idea - about how the world works. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your head, which is used here to represent your beliefs about the world.
Imagine next that your neighbor offers to pay you ten cents. Now do you mow the lawn? The answer is still No. Why not this time? Well, the problem this time is not that you disbelieve the promise. Of course your neighbor would pay such a paltry sum. In fact, this is such a good deal for your neighbor that now you do not even want the deal. The problem this time is that, while you do now ‘’believe’‘ the promise, you no longer ’‘care’‘ about the promise. Ten cents is simply not a sufficient incentive to get you outside to mow anybody’s lawn on a hot August afternoon. In this example the obstacle to action is with what you desire - or want, love, value, crave, or are motivated by. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your heart, which is used here to represent your desires.
Finally, imagine that your neighbor offers to pay you twenty dollars, and that this is the usual and fair rate for mowing a lawn. Now does the lawn finally get mowed? Well, it still depends. There is no problem this time in either your head or in your heart. The price is low enough that you believe the promise to pay, and yet high enough that you are motivated to act. But there is still a third principle of action to consider. Do you in fact have the ability to mow the lawn? And the answer to this question is No, not if your lawn mower is at the repair shop, or if your leg is broken, or if you are on the way out the door to attend your big sister’s wedding. If any of these conditions exists, then you are not going to spend the afternoon mowing your neighbor’s lawn. Even though you want the twenty dollars, and even though you firmly believe that mowing the lawn would result in your receiving that twenty dollars. In this third example the obstacle to action is that you simply lack the ability - or the strength, skill, tools, knowledge, time, energy, money, social or political connections, or other some other ability or resource - that is necessary to engage in the action. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your hands, which is used here to represent your ability to act.
So deliberate behavior results only when all three necessary principles of action are satisfied. Or in other words, when: (1) your head says that a particular outcome is possible and that a particular course of action is likely to result in that outcome; (2) your heart says that you want that outcome more than the cost of acquiring it; and (3) your hands are capable of engaging in the required course of action.
False belief versus true belief. In this framework, beliefs channel our behaviors into the courses of action that we think will get us what we want. Two investors who both want to make money and who both have the exact same amount of cash will nevertheless act differently if one of them thinks the market is about to go up and the other expects that it will soon go down. One will obviously buy and the other will just as obviously sell. To generalize, people with identical desires and abilities will nevertheless act differently if they have different beliefs about the world. Thus beliefs function to channel deliberate behaviors toward some courses of action and away from others. In this example it makes no difference whether a belief is in fact true. Investors do not sell because the market will in fact go down tomorrow, but rather because they believe that it will. Action is not determined by what is actually true, but rather by what we believe is true. This does not mean that the actual truth of a belief is unimportant. Just ask the investor who sold, believing that the market would soon go down, shortly before it instead went up. Economists say that optimal decisions are made in environments of perfect information. When our beliefs are false, we end up with unintended and often undesirable outcomes. But the difference between true belief and false belief is a difference in outcomes, not a difference in behaviors. Actions are thus determined by our beliefs about what is true and not by what is in fact true. The functional role that belief plays as a principle of action can thus be understood without having to first determine whether a particular belief is true or false. The truth or falsity of a belief only matters when we start looking at the consequences of behavior. (So while faith is a principle of action, true faith is a principle of power, or of actually achieving outcomes rather than simply engaging in behaviors). This matters when you move from exercising agency to choose what you wan to do, to exercising agency to choose what eternal results you want to achieve.
Agency defined in terms of principles of action. Agency can be defined in terms of these three principles of head, heart, and hands. We are able to: (1) intelligently exercise agency in the pursuit what our heart desires (2) when our head is filled with accurate beliefs about what outcomes are possible and what behaviors are required to obtain those outcomes, and (3) when our hands are at liberty to engage in the behaviors that we believe will lead to those outcomes.
Church and state protect the exercise of agency. One way to understand church and state is that the church is intended to provides our heads with accurate information about the eternal nature of our choices, while the state is intended to protect the liberty of our hands to in fact act on our choices. Accurate information may not be required to choose what we want to do, but it is required to accurately choose what we want to become in eternity. One of the roles of the church is to provide that accurate information.
When church and state are understood as the protectors of such a central principle as agency, it makes sense that the Book of Mormon would occupy itself so much with these two principles. In Mosiah 25-29 (discussion) church and state are separated, and Alma must figure out the relationship between the two institutions. It unsurprising that the Book of Mormon also describes two opposing social institutions that limit agency: anti-Christs, who provide false information to our heads about the nature of our choices, and secret combinations, which seek to destroy our liberty or to tie our hands.
Much of D&C 134 can be understood as rules that implement a more general principle of protecting agency through the free exercise of conscience (head) and protecting liberty through the maintenance of law and order (hands).
Ripeness for destruction defined in terms of respecting agency. Societies are destroyed when they cast out the righteous, or when they tie the hands of the people so they are unable to choose the right. (See the discussion at Hel 13:14). There appears not to be an analogous condition regarding the head, perhaps because all mankind has access to the light of Christ. (Moro 7:16).
  • D&C 134: Life, liberty, and property. Section 134 addresses the relationship between the state and the individual. There is always a tension between the needs of the group as a whole and the needs of each individual. Political parties that give more weight to the needs or survival of the group are called "nationalistic," while those that give more weight to the needs and rights of the individual are called "liberal" (this usage of "liberal" dating from the 1700's differs from frequent current usage that distinguishes conservative parties from those that are progressive or "liberal"). Section 134 draws a line at which the needs of the group and of the individual should be balanced.
The manner in which Section 134 balances the rights of the group and of the individual can be understood in terms similar to "life, liberty, and property."

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 134 is __.
  • D&C 134 was first published in __.
  • D&C 134 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 134:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 134.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 107a                         Next section: D&C 108

D&C 134:6-12

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This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 134: Mediating with man and with God. Section 134 addresses the relationships between church, state, and man. One framework for understanding these relationships is to see the church as mediating the relationship between man and God, and the state as mediating the relationship between man and man (and lawyers as mediating between man and the state, and doctors as standing between man and death).
  • D&C 134: Church, state, and agency. Among the relationships addressed in D&C 134 is the relationship between church and state. One framework for understanding that relationship is to see these two institutions as each protecting a different aspect of agency. Given the importance of agency to the Father's plan (see this discussion at Matt 5:48), it can be expected that institutions that protect agency will themselves be important to the Father's plan. The relationship of church and state to agency becomes clear when agency is understood in terms of principles of action.
Principles of action: beliefs, desires, and abilities, or head, heart, and hands. Lectures on Faith begins with the statement that faith is a principle of action. (Lectures on Faith 1.11). The argument is that you would never act by planting seeds in the spring unless you had faith, or believed, that you would be able to harvest your crops in the fall. Thinking in terms of principles of action, or of necessary conditions for deliberate behavior, suggests that there are three principles of action: belief (head), desire (heart), and ability (hands). When all three necessary conditions are satisfied, the result is deliberate behavior, When any of the three principles is unsatisfied, such behavior does not result.
For example, imagine that you are 13 years old. It is a hot August afternoon. Your neighbor offers to hire you to mow his lawn before guests begin arriving at his house that evening. Imagine further that he offers to pay you a million dollars. Do you mow the lawn? No. Why not? Because you do not believe that he really intends to pay you a million dollars and therefore doubt whether he will pay you at all. In this example the obstacle to action is with what you believe - or think, know, have faith, are convinced, expect, suppose, assume, or have some idea - about how the world works. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your head, which is used here to represent your beliefs about the world.
Imagine next that your neighbor offers to pay you ten cents. Now do you mow the lawn? The answer is still No. Why not this time? Well, the problem this time is not that you disbelieve the promise. Of course your neighbor would pay such a paltry sum. In fact, this is such a good deal for your neighbor that now you do not even want the deal. The problem this time is that, while you do now ‘’believe’‘ the promise, you no longer ’‘care’‘ about the promise. Ten cents is simply not a sufficient incentive to get you outside to mow anybody’s lawn on a hot August afternoon. In this example the obstacle to action is with what you desire - or want, love, value, crave, or are motivated by. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your heart, which is used here to represent your desires.
Finally, imagine that your neighbor offers to pay you twenty dollars, and that this is the usual and fair rate for mowing a lawn. Now does the lawn finally get mowed? Well, it still depends. There is no problem this time in either your head or in your heart. The price is low enough that you believe the promise to pay, and yet high enough that you are motivated to act. But there is still a third principle of action to consider. Do you in fact have the ability to mow the lawn? And the answer to this question is No, not if your lawn mower is at the repair shop, or if your leg is broken, or if you are on the way out the door to attend your big sister’s wedding. If any of these conditions exists, then you are not going to spend the afternoon mowing your neighbor’s lawn. Even though you want the twenty dollars, and even though you firmly believe that mowing the lawn would result in your receiving that twenty dollars. In this third example the obstacle to action is that you simply lack the ability - or the strength, skill, tools, knowledge, time, energy, money, social or political connections, or other some other ability or resource - that is necessary to engage in the action. In this example the cause of inaction can be said to reside in your hands, which is used here to represent your ability to act.
So deliberate behavior results only when all three necessary principles of action are satisfied. Or in other words, when: (1) your head says that a particular outcome is possible and that a particular course of action is likely to result in that outcome; (2) your heart says that you want that outcome more than the cost of acquiring it; and (3) your hands are capable of engaging in the required course of action.
False belief versus true belief. In this framework, beliefs channel our behaviors into the courses of action that we think will get us what we want. Two investors who both want to make money and who both have the exact same amount of cash will nevertheless act differently if one of them thinks the market is about to go up and the other expects that it will soon go down. One will obviously buy and the other will just as obviously sell. To generalize, people with identical desires and abilities will nevertheless act differently if they have different beliefs about the world. Thus beliefs function to channel deliberate behaviors toward some courses of action and away from others. In this example it makes no difference whether a belief is in fact true. Investors do not sell because the market will in fact go down tomorrow, but rather because they believe that it will. Action is not determined by what is actually true, but rather by what we believe is true. This does not mean that the actual truth of a belief is unimportant. Just ask the investor who sold, believing that the market would soon go down, shortly before it instead went up. Economists say that optimal decisions are made in environments of perfect information. When our beliefs are false, we end up with unintended and often undesirable outcomes. But the difference between true belief and false belief is a difference in outcomes, not a difference in behaviors. Actions are thus determined by our beliefs about what is true and not by what is in fact true. The functional role that belief plays as a principle of action can thus be understood without having to first determine whether a particular belief is true or false. The truth or falsity of a belief only matters when we start looking at the consequences of behavior. (So while faith is a principle of action, true faith is a principle of power, or of actually achieving outcomes rather than simply engaging in behaviors). This matters when you move from exercising agency to choose what you wan to do, to exercising agency to choose what eternal results you want to achieve.
Agency defined in terms of principles of action. Agency can be defined in terms of these three principles of head, heart, and hands. We are able to: (1) intelligently exercise agency in the pursuit what our heart desires (2) when our head is filled with accurate beliefs about what outcomes are possible and what behaviors are required to obtain those outcomes, and (3) when our hands are at liberty to engage in the behaviors that we believe will lead to those outcomes.
Church and state protect the exercise of agency. One way to understand church and state is that the church is intended to provides our heads with accurate information about the eternal nature of our choices, while the state is intended to protect the liberty of our hands to in fact act on our choices. Accurate information may not be required to choose what we want to do, but it is required to accurately choose what we want to become in eternity. One of the roles of the church is to provide that accurate information.
When church and state are understood as the protectors of such a central principle as agency, it makes sense that the Book of Mormon would occupy itself so much with these two principles. In Mosiah 25-29 (discussion) church and state are separated, and Alma must figure out the relationship between the two institutions. It unsurprising that the Book of Mormon also describes two opposing social institutions that limit agency: anti-Christs, who provide false information to our heads about the nature of our choices, and secret combinations, which seek to destroy our liberty or to tie our hands.
Much of D&C 134 can be understood as rules that implement a more general principle of protecting agency through the free exercise of conscience (head) and protecting liberty through the maintenance of law and order (hands).
Ripeness for destruction defined in terms of respecting agency. Societies are destroyed when they cast out the righteous, or when they tie the hands of the people so they are unable to choose the right. (See the discussion at Hel 13:14). There appears not to be an analogous condition regarding the head, perhaps because all mankind has access to the light of Christ. (Moro 7:16).
  • D&C 134: Life, liberty, and property. Section 134 addresses the relationship between the state and the individual. There is always a tension between the needs of the group as a whole and the needs of each individual. Political parties that give more weight to the needs or survival of the group are called "nationalistic," while those that give more weight to the needs and rights of the individual are called "liberal" (this usage of "liberal" dating from the 1700's differs from frequent current usage that distinguishes conservative parties from those that are progressive or "liberal"). Section 134 draws a line at which the needs of the group and of the individual should be balanced.
The manner in which Section 134 balances the rights of the group and of the individual can be understood in terms similar to "life, liberty, and property."

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 134 is __.
  • D&C 134 was first published in __.
  • D&C 134 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 134:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 134.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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A of F 1:11-13

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This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This section should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This section contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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