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Jacob 2:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Jacob > Chapters 2-3
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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Jacob. The relationship of Chapters 2-3 to the rest of Jacob is discussed at Jacob.

Story. Chapters 2-3 consists of five major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 2-3 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Jacob 2:6. It seems that vs. 6 all ties back into Jacob 1:19 where it reads "And we did magnify our office unto the Lord, taking upon us the responsibility, answering the sins of the people upon our own heads if we did not teach them the word of God with all diligence..." In Jacob 2:6, Jacob is lamenting that these wicked people are not listening, and that perhaps he is not teaching the them in a way that they will listen to him. He is literally answering their wickness upon his own head, and shrinking with shame for it.
  • Jacob 3:5: Whoredoms. In the Hebrew Old Testament, the term whoredom occurs only 26 times as a translation of the Hebrew verb zanah (=commit whoredom, whore, fornication). While it may be tempting to read this in light of modern practices of prostitution or sexual immorality, its use in the Book of Mormon may have more do do with sexual rites associated with the worship of fertility gods. If that is the case, the Nephites in their quest for riches and prosperity may be tempted to indulge in fertility rites involving sexual acts, perhaps with designated ritual prostitutes.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Jacob 2:1: Who is narrating here? Jacob? If so, why write of himself in the third person?
  • Jacob 2:1: What is the significance of stating that these teachings were given "after the death of Nephi"? Is there a connection between Nephi's death and these teachings, or are we just being told that to place it somehow within a chronology?
  • Jacob 2:2: Beloved brethren. What does Jacob mean by "beloved brethren"? Are these all his literal relatives? How big is the Nephite group at this point?
  • Jacob 2:2: Under. What does it mean to be "under" a responsibility to God?
  • Jacob 2:2: Magnify. What does Jacob mean by magnifying his office.
  • Jacob 2:2: Soberness. Why does Jacob mention soberness here?
  • Jacob 2:2: Rid garments of sins. What does this phrase mean? What is the connection between garments and sins? Jacob explains this teaching a bit in Jacob 1:19, but it is hard to see a teaching like this in the Old Testament. Where does this understanding come from?
  • Jacob 2:3: What exactly is Jacob's calling in the temple?
  • Jacob 2:3: Why is Jacob "weighed down with...desire and anxiety"? Should we feel the same way about those around us?
  • Jacob 2:4: If the people have been obedient to Jacob's teachings so far, why is he "weighed down with...anxiety"?
  • Jacob 2:5: Is Jacob preaching against the Nephite's actions, or just against their thoughts and intentions?
  • Jacob 2:5: How might evil thoughts be considered laboring in sin?
  • Jacob 2:5: How can thoughts be "very abominable"?
  • Jacob 2:5: How does God help Jacob know the thoughts of the people?
  • Jacob 2:5: Why does Jacob refer to God here as "the all-powerful Creator of heaven and earth"?
  • Jacob 2:6: Why does the wickedness of Jacob's people cause him to "shrink with shame" before God?
  • Jacob 2:11: What might Jacob have been praying about when he obtained his errand from the Lord? Is it significant that he obtained it while already praying, as opposed to out of the blue?
  • Jacob 2:13: In what ways does material progress lead to pride? Is this inevitable, or are there ways to obtain riches and avoid pride?
  • Jacob 2:15: What does it mean to be pierced by the eye of God?
  • Jacob 2:17: What does it mean to be "familiar with all"
  • Jacob 2:19: Verse 19 tell us that after we have a hope in Christ we will get riches if we seek them. Then it says "and ye will seek them for the intent to do good." How should we interpret this statement. Is this something like "Those who truly have first a hope in Christ who choose to seek for riches will do so with the intent to do good"? Or, is this prescriptive--something like "Once you really have hope in Christ, seek for riches so that you can do good"?
  • Jacob 2:28: What is the reason for having one wife that the Lord delights in the chastity of women? It seems like the commandment is given to men specifically concerning women, so shouldn't the reason be because He delights in the chastity of men?
  • Jacob 3:1: What does it mean to be pure in heart?
  • Jacob 3:1: How might one "look unto God with firmness of mind"? What is the difference between having a firm mind and beginning to labor in sin through your thoughts (cf. Jacob 2:5)?
  • Jacob 3:1: What does it mean to pray "with exceeding faith"? How is this different from normal prayer?
  • Jacob 3:1: What does Jacob mean by promising that the Lord will "send down justice upon those who seek your destruction"? Is he speaking specifically about the current situation faced by the Nephites? Who might be seeking their destruction? Does this have anything to do with the threat of plural marriage leading "away captive the daughters of [the] people" (cf. Jacob 2:33)?
  • Jacob 3:2: Why are the pure in heart told to "lift up" their heads? What is the difference between a bowed and a lifted up head?
  • Jacob 3:2: How is one to "receive the pleasing word of God?" What is it that makes it pleasing?
  • Jacob 3:2: What does it mean to "feast upon [God's] love"?
  • Jacob 3:2: What does having a firm mind have to do with feasting upon God's love? What does it mean to have a "firm" mind?
  • Jacob 3:3: How does not having a pure heart make one "filthy"?
  • Jacob 3:3: Why are the Lamanites, who are cursed, promised as a scourge to wicked Nephites?
  • Jacob 3:4: Is this a prophecy of Omni 1:12? If so, how can the intervening 2+ centuries be considered a time that "speedily cometh"?
  • Jacob 3:5: Why do the Nephites "hate" the Lamanites? Is it because of their "filthiness" or their dark skin? Is this racism?
  • Jacob 3:5: Apparently at this point, there are not "whoredoms" among the Lamanites, and they are not mentioned among the Lamanites until after the peaceful period after the coming of Christ. Why are they so prominently mentioned among the Nephites, but not among the Lamanites?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapter 1                      Next page: Chapter 4

D&C 6:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 6
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Summary[edit]

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D&C 6 is addressed to Oliver Cowdery.

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received: April 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 5
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 7

Oliver Cowdery taught school at Manchester, New York during the 1828-1829 school year. A portion of his compensation was received in the form of free lodging at the homes of his students. During his stay with the Joseph Smith Sr. family he obtained a testimony that Joseph had been called of God and that he (Oliver) had a role to play in assisting Joseph.

Once school let out for the spring planting season, Oliver traveled with Samuel Smith to Harmony, Pennsylvania. They arrived, and Oliver first met Joseph, on April 5. Two days later they began translating as a team on April 7. Almost all of what we have today as the Book of Mormon was translated by Joseph and Oliver during the months of April to June 1829.

During the first month of April 1829 Joseph received three revelations directed to Oliver Cowdery. In D&C 6 Oliver was told that he had a gift to translate. In D&C 8 he received permission to translate. After Oliver's attempt to translate ended in failure, D&C 9 explained why.

For a brief overview of D&C 6 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 6:2: Dividing Asunder. This phrase seems to come from Heb 4:12, where the word of God "is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart."

Outline and page map[edit]

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  • D&C 6 can be outlined as a chiasm:
a. the willing are called to labor in the vineyard, the Lord's word is powerful (1-4)
b. keep the commandments, preach repentance, and bring forth Zion (5-9)
c. Oliver's gift to find out mysteries, the greatest gift is salvation (10-13)
d. first witness of truth of the work: enlightenment (14-17)
e. exhortation to diligence and humility (18-21)
d. second witness of truth of the work: hidden knowledge (22-24)
c. Oliver's gift to assist in translating (25-28)
b. you are blessed whether your word is accepted or rejected (29-31)
a. fear not, for the wicked cannot prevail against the righteous (32-37)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 6:2: What does it mean to say that the word of the Lord can divide asunder both joints and marrow?
  • D&C 6:3: Does this imply that anyone who wants to do the Lord's work is called? Or does "reaping" imply that one has to first be authorized to perform saving ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 6 is ___________.
  • D&C 6 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 6.

  • Several sections addressed to Joseph Smith's early supporters share similar language beginning with "A great and marvelous work is about to come forth ..."
  • D&C 4 directed to Joseph Smith Sr. and D&C 11 to Hyrum Smith of Manchester-Palmyra, New York,
  • D&C 6 to Oliver Cowdery at Harmony, Pennsylvania,
  • D&C 12 to Joseph Knight Sr. of Colesville, New York, and
  • D&C 14 to David Whitmer of Fayette, New York.
This language is thus circulated to all four centers of activity in New York-Pennsylvania. Although D&C 4 was received first and is today the best known of these revelations, D&C 6:1-6 is repeated in the later sections almost word for word. And D&C 6 is placed closer to the front of the 1835 and 1844 editions of the Doctrine & Covenants than those other sections. It thus appears that D&C 6 was the most prominent of these sections in the early days of the Church.
  • D&C 6, D&C 8, and D&C 9 comprise a group of three revelations all directed to Olivery Cowdery during April 1829 regarding his participation in the Book of Mormon translation. In D&C 6 Oliver was told that he had a gift to translate. In D&C 8 he received permission to translate. After he tried to translate but was unable, D&C 9 explained why.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 6:36: Doubt Not. See "On the value of doubt" by Nate Oman at the T&S blog for a discussion of the role doubt has played in modern philosophy and the possible tension of this verse with the asking "if these things are not true" in Moro 10:4.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 5                         Next section: D&C 7

D&C 105:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 105
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Summary[edit]

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 104
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 106

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106

D&C 124:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125


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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:11-15

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:16-20

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:86-90

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:96-100

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:101-105

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:106-110

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 126:1-3

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 126
Previous section: D&C 125                         Next section: D&C 127


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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 125
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 127

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 126 is __.
  • D&C 126 was first published in __.
  • D&C 126 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 126:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 126.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 125                         Next section: D&C 127

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