D&C 76:81-119

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Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

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  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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