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Identifying the principal blocks of text in Genesis is easiest by working in reverse from back to front and by focusing on the phrase "These are the generations of X." Variations on this phrase appear twelve times in Genesis and are consistently used to indicate the beginning of a new block of text. This phrase can be understood as "These are the descendants of X," or "This is what followed after X." The use of this phrase in organizing the text of Genesis can be seen in the [[#Complete outline and page map | complete outline of Genesis]] below.
 
Identifying the principal blocks of text in Genesis is easiest by working in reverse from back to front and by focusing on the phrase "These are the generations of X." Variations on this phrase appear twelve times in Genesis and are consistently used to indicate the beginning of a new block of text. This phrase can be understood as "These are the descendants of X," or "This is what followed after X." The use of this phrase in organizing the text of Genesis can be seen in the [[#Complete outline and page map | complete outline of Genesis]] below.
  
* '''[[Genesis 36-50 | Gen 36-50]]: Joseph Cycle.''' The last three appearances of this phrase occur in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/36.1?lang=eng Gen 36:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/36.9?lang=eng#8 Gen 36:9], and [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/37.2?lang=eng#1 Gen 37:2]. The first two of these instances each introduce a genealogical list of the descendants of Isaac's son Esau that collectively fill only one chapter. The story of the descendants of Isaac's other son Jacob is introduced by the third instance of this phrase. This story of Jacob's descendants fills the last fourteen chapters of Genesis and is primarily about Joseph. For simplicity, all of the stories in the entire last quarter of Genesis, including the two lists of Esau's descendants, are often referred to collectively as the Joseph Cycle.
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* '''[[Genesis 36-50 | Gen 36-50]]: Joseph Cycle.''' The last three appearances of this phrase occur in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/36.1?lang=eng Gen 36:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/36.9?lang=eng#8 Gen 36:9], and [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/37.2?lang=eng#1 Gen 37:2]. The first two of these instances each introduce a genealogical list of the descendants of Isaac's son Esau the collectively fill only one chapter. The story of the descendants of Isaac's other son Jacob is introduced by the third instance of this phrase. This story of Jacob's descendants fills the last fourteen chapters of Genesis and is primarily about Joseph. For simplicity the entire last quarter of Genesis, including the two lists of Esau's descendants, is often called the Joseph Cycle of stories.
  
* '''[[Genesis 25-35 | Gen 25b-35]]: Jacob Cycle.''' The two previous appearance of this phrase occur in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/25.12?lang=eng#11 Gen 25:12] and [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/25.18?lang=eng#18 Gen 25:19]. The first of these two instances introduces a genealogical list of the descendants of Abraham's son Ishmael that fills only seven verses. The story of the descendants of Abraham's other son Isaac is  introduced by the other instance of this phrase. This story of Isaac's two sons fills more than ten chapters and is primarily about Jacob rather than Esau. For simplicity, the entire third quarter of Genesis, including the list of Ishmael's descendants, is often called the Jacob Cycle.
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* '''[[Genesis 25-35 | Gen 25b-35]]: Jacob Cycle.''' The two previous appearance of this phrase occur in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/25.12?lang=eng#11 Gen 25:12] and [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/25.18?lang=eng#18 Gen 25:19]. The first of these two instances introduces a genealogical list of the descendants of Abraham's son Ishmael and fills only seven verses. The story of the descendants of Abraham's other son Isaac is  introduced by the other instance of this phrase. This story of Isaac's two sons fills more than ten chapters and is primarily about Jacob rather than Esau. For simplicity the entire third quarter of Genesis, including the list of Ishmael's descendants, is often called the Jacob Cycle.
  
* '''[[Genesis 11-25 | Gen 11c-25a]]: Abraham Cycle.''' The previous appearance of this phrase occurs in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/11.27?lang=eng#26 Gen 11:27] and introduces more than fifteen chapters about the life of Terah's son Abraham. This second quarter of Genesis is often called the Abraham Cycle. While this phrase introduces story cycles in Genesis for both Abraham and Jacob, it does not introduce a separate cycle for Isaac. Thus, while the phrase "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob" appears frequently in the scriptures, including in Genesis, it is apparent that Genesis treats Isaac more as a link between Abraham and Jacob than as a separate point of focus.
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* '''[[Genesis 11-25 | Gen 11c-25a]]: Abraham Cycle.''' The previous appearance of this phrase occurs in [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/11.27?lang=eng#26 Gen 11:27] and introduces more than fifteen chapters about the life of Terah's son Abraham. This second quarter of Genesis is often called the Abraham Cycle. While this phrase introduces story cycles for both Abraham and Jacob, it does not introduce a separate cycle for Isaac. Thus, while the phrase "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob" appears frequently in the scriptures, including in Genesis, it is apparent from the outline below that Genesis treats Isaac more as a link between generations than as a point of focus.
  
* '''[[Genesis 1-11 | Gen 1-11b]]: Adam-Noah Cycle.''' Variations of this phrase occur six more times in the first eleven chapters of Genesis, which provides the key to further subdividing the first quarter of genesis into its major parts. ([http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/1.1?lang=eng Gen 1:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/2.4?lang=eng#3 2:4]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/5.1?lang=eng 5:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/6.9?lang=eng#8 6:9]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/10.1?lang=eng 10:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/11.10?lang=eng#9 11:10]). For simplicity, the entire initial quarter of Genesis is often called the Adam-Noah Cycle.
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* '''[[Genesis 1-11 | Gen 1-11b]]: Adam-Noah Cycle.''' Variations of this phrase occur six more times in the first eleven chapters of Genesis, which provides the key to further subdividing that block of text into its major constituent parts. ([http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/1.1?lang=eng Gen 1:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/2.4?lang=eng#3 2:4]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/5.1?lang=eng 5:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/6.9?lang=eng#8 6:9]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/10.1?lang=eng 10:1]; [http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/gen/11.10?lang=eng#9 11:10]). For simplicity this entire initial quarter of Genesis is often called the Adam-Noah Cycle.
  
 
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== Outline and page map ==
 
== Outline and page map ==
  

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