Isa 11:1-16

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Home > The Old Testament > Isaiah > Chapter 11
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Summary[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

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  • Isa 11:1. The IIT has this as, "A shoot will spring up from the stock of Jesse and a branch from its graft bear fruit."
  • Isa 11:9. Verse 9 speaks of "the knowledge of the Lord..." This is referring to the LORD-Jehovah. Jehovah means in the original Hebrew language "Self-Existant One or Eternal One". This tells us that the LORD-Jehovah has always existed and will always exist. This is hard for our little minds I know, but this shows how awesome our God is. The LORD-Jehovah was mentioned some 6,823 times in the Old Testament and we find the first mentioning in Genesis 2:4 in tandem with GOD-Elohim or Eloheem in the Hebrew. Sounds like this "When Jehovah-Elohim made the earth and the heavens..." Jehovah: Self-Existant One and Elohim: Sovereign, Most powerful this is a tandem of holiness beyond our imaginations. So, it could also sound like this: "When our Self Existant Lord and Most powerful Sovereign God made the earth and the heavens..." I just love God's word don't you? Thought I would share.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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Resources[edit]

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  • Isa 11:12. Boyd K. Packer, "A Defense and a Refuge," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 85–88. Elder Packer said: "We speak of the Church as our refuge, our defense... Latter-day Saints learn to look within themselves to see the redeeming power of the Savior of all mankind. The principles of the gospel taught in the Church and learned from the scriptures become a guide for each of us individually and for our families. We know that the homes we establish, and those of our descendants, will be the refuge spoken of in the revelations—the 'light,' the 'standard,' the 'ensign' for all nations..."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




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