Isa 60:1-66:24

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Home > The Old Testament > Isaiah > Chapters 60-66
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Summary[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Isa 60:22: I the Lord will hasten. A theme that seems to run through Isaiah is the Lord hastening the work "in his time". We, however, are admonished to not make haste (see the discussion at Isa 28:4).
  • Isa 63:4: Redeemed. The Hebrew word for redeemed is גּאל or gaw-al'. The word redeemed refers to being the "next of kin" and being willing to "buy back his relative's property" or "marry his widow" (Strongs). This implies that the act of redeeming is a family obligation. Continuing the metaphor, to be redeemed is to be saved because a man has died and can no longer fulfill his family obligations. Drawing this conclusion makes sense in light of Genesis 2:17, "for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die." Since sin causes spiritual death (see related links) and a loss of eternal blessings, being redeemed is the purchasing back or redemption of those blessings.
  • Isa 64:2: Nations. The Hebrew word גּי גּוי or go'ee, go'-ee implies (1) a massing of people, i.e. a nation; or (2) a foreign nation or the Gentiles or heathen people (Strongs). The context of "nations" implies a people who will fear the second coming or those who are the Lord's adversaries. Hence, the nations are the Gentile, heathen nations, or those who remain in their iniquities.
  • Isa 64:4: God. The Hebrew word for God in this verse is אלהים or el-o-heem' (Ibid) which implies the supreme God or chief of the Gods. According to this verse the Father has not fully revealed the blessings awaiting those who are righteous at the second coming. However, He has given glimpses of these blessings. But we do not know in full what it means that "They who dwell in his presence are the church of the Firstborn; and they see as they are seen, and know as they are known, having received of his fulness and of his grace; And he makes them equal in power, and in might, and in dominion" D&C 76:92-95.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Isa 61:1-3: What are the good tidings that the Messiah preaches to the meek? How does he bind up the brokenhearted? To what captives does the Messiah proclaim liberty? What kind of liberty does he proclaim? What does "the acceptable year of our Lord" mean? Why is the day of the Lord a day of vengeance? Against whom? How does the Messiah comfort those who mourn? What does the Lord promise in the first part of verse 3? What does it mean to be called a tree of righteousness? What does it mean to say that we are "the planting of the Lord"? How does the coming of the Lord and the things he does when he comes glorify him?
  • Isa 63:4: What does it mean to be redeemed in light of the fact that it requires vengeance?
  • Isa 64:2: What nations will "tremble at thy presence"?
  • Isa 64:4: What does the Father have "prepared for him that waiteth for him"?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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