Mal 1:1-4:6

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The Old Testament > Malachi

Subpages: Disputation 1 (1:1-5), Disputation 2 (1:6-2:9), Disputation 3 (2:10-16), Disputation 4 (2:17-3:6), Disputation 5 (3:7-12), Disputation 6 (3:13-4:6)

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting

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A broader treatment of the history of ancient Israel, including Malachi, is found at Old Testament: Historical Overview.


Summary

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Malachi is widely recognized to consist of a series of six disputations:

1. The Lord is loyal to his covenant with Israel (1:1-5)
2. The priests must perform temple ordinances with respect (1:6-2:9)
3. Israel has been disloyal to its (marriage) covenants (2:10-16)
4. The Lord will come out in judgment against the wicked (2:17-3:6)
5. The lay membership must support temple ordinances (through tithes) (3:7-12)
6. The Lord will bless the righteous (3:13-4:6)

Each of these disputations is addressed separately on the following subpages: Disputation 1 (1:1-5), Disputation 2 (1:6-2:9), Disputation 3 (2:10-16), Disputation 4 (2:17-3:6), Disputation 5 (3:7-12), Disputation 6 (3:13-4:6)


Discussion

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Points to ponder

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I have a question

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Relation to other scriptures

This heading is for notes about the relationship of this book to other sections and passages. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Related scriptures

  • Malachi is one of the "Twelve Minor Prophets" (NEED TO ADD page for discussion of minor prophets as a group).
  • The book of Matthew is widely recognized as a chiasmus in which the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5-7) is located in parallel with the Olivet Discourse (Matt 24-25). It appears that Third Nephi 11-30 is also organized as a chiasmus in which the Sermon on the Mount (3 Ne 12-14) is located in parallel with the last two chapters of Malachi (3 Ne 24-25). This raises questions about the relationship of Malachi 3-4 to the Sermon on the Mount. This also raises questions about what is similar between Malachi 3-4 and the Olivet Discourse so that they are both placed in parallel with the Sermon on the Mount, and what is different so that the Oliver Discourse is used in Matthew while the last two chapters of Malachi are instead used in Third Nephi. It is worth noting in this regard that all three of these passages are among the most widely repeated chapter-length passages in all of the scriptures, and are thus likely among the most important.

Parallel passages

Text transmission

Joseph Smith Translation

The Joseph Smith Translation made no changes to the book of Malachi.[1]


Complete outline and page map

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Malachi

1. The Lord is loyal to his covenant with Israel (1:1-5)

2. The priests must perform temple ordinances with respect (1:6-2:9)

3. Israel has been disloyal to its (marriage) covenants (2:10-16)

4. The Lord will come out in judgment against the wicked (2:17-3:6)

5. The lay membership must support temple ordinances (through tithes) (3:7-12)

6. The Lord will bless the righteous (3:13-4:6)


Resources

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Translations

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Cited references

  • Ehat, Andrew. The Words of Joseph Smith. (1991).
  • Glazier-Smith, Beth. Malachi: The Divine Messenger. (Scholars Press, 1987).
  • Hill. The Anchor Bible: Malachi. (1998).
  • McComiskey, Thomas, ed. The Minor Prophets. (Baker Books, 1998).
  • Steinmann. Andrew E. From Abraham to Paul: A Biblical Chronology. St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 2011. (ISBN 0758627998). BS637.3 .S74 2011.
  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the Old Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2009. (ISBN 1606411314) BX8630 .A2 2009.

Other resources


Notes

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the Old Testament, p. 220.



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