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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


Daniel 2

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Daniel. The relationship of Chapter 2 to Daniel as a whole, and in particular to the two visions of beasts in Chapters 7-8, is discussed at Daniel. The historical setting of Chapter 2 is also discussed at Daniel.

Story. Chapter 2 tells the story of Daniel interpreting king Nebuchadnezzar's dream of the statue. Chapter 2 can be read in several parts.

  • Verses 1-9: the king’s request to recount the dream will verify its interpretation.
  • Verses 10-13: the king’s priests state that only a god can reveal dreams.
  • Verses 14-19: Daniel promises to interpret the dream.
  • Verses 19-23: Daniel praises God as the controller of history, revealer of secrets, and source of his own wisdom.
  • Verses 24-25: Daniel states that he is ready to interpret the dream.
  • Verses 26-30: Daniel states that only God can reveal the dream.
  • Verses 31-36: Daniel recounts the king’s dream.
  • Verses 37-45: Daniel interprets the king’s dream.
  • Verses 46-49: the king praises God as a true revealer of secrets.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapter 2 include:


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

This chapter can be read as a chiasmus. When this is done, it emerges that the main point is not the interpretation of the dream, but the fact that God is in change of the future history that was revealed in the dream.

a. the king’s request to recount the dream will verify its interpretation (2:1-9)
b. the king’s priests state that only a god can reveal dreams (2:10-13)
c. Daniel promises to interpret the dream (2:14-19)
d. Daniel praises God as the controller of history, revealer of secrets, and source of his own wisdom (2:19-23)
c. Daniel states that he is ready to interpret the dream (2:24-25)
b. Daniel states that only God can reveal the dream (2:26-30)
a. Daniel recounts the king’s dream (2:31-36)
a. Daniel interprets the king’s dream (2:37-45)
d. the king praises God as a true revealer of secrets (2:46-49)

Discussions of this chapter usually focus on the substance of King Nebuchadnezzar’s dream. But at the most important point in this chiasmus, the center, Daniel instead emphasizes the more basic point that God alone can reveal such dreams and that God does control in the affairs of men (2:19-23).

The single best resource for interpreting the visions in the Book of Daniel is the collection of general authority quotes in the LDS Old Testament Institute Manual: Daniel. (PDF version), sec. 28-13, p. 298-99. It quotes Apostle Rudger Clawson stating in the April 1930 General Conference that: (#1) the head of brass is the Babylonian empire, (#2) the arms and breast of silver are the empire of the Medes and Persians, (#3) the belly and thighs of brass are the Greek empire of Alexander the Great, which upon his death was split into four empires, (#4) the two legs of iron are the Roman empire with its two capitals at Rome and Constantinople, and (#4b) the ten toes are the European nations that descended from Rome. It also quotes President Spencer Kimball stating in the April 1976 General Conference that the Church has been restored in the days of the European nations as (#5) “the kingdom set up by the God of heaven that would never be destroyed nor superseded, and the stone cut out of the mountain without hands that would become a great mountain and would fill the whole earth.”


Parallel passages[edit]

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Points to ponder[edit]

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Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.




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Rev 14:6-10

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Summary[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Rev 12: The Joseph Smith Translation. In the original manuscripts for the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible, there are only a few changes to the Book of Revelation. The first eight verses of the first chapter are changed quite a bit, and two or three verses in the rest of the book have substantial changes. Besides these, there are only words here and there adjusted. Except for this chapter. Joseph performed something of an overhaul on chapter 12, and the consequences of the changes are quite important--especially for the Latter-day Saint understanding of the temple and its role. Besides a number of word changes, the very order of the verses in chapter 12 are reworked. For example, what is in the NT the whole of verse 5 becomes part of verse 2 in the JST. This first example of reordering the verses has a major consequence: there seem to be two visions in the JST. A first vision of the birth of the son is followed by a retrospective vision of the dragon's threat. The temporal flow of the chapter is, in short, disturbed in the JST, and it is not exactly clear why it should be. These difficulties call for interpretation.
But perhaps even before these questions might be approached, there is a major interpretive addition to these verses in the JST, one that deserves careful attention. Joseph adds in what would roughly be verse 7 the briefest explanation of what the symbols are (though not exactly what they represent). Joseph writes: "and the draggon prevailed not against Michael, neither the child, nor the woman, which was the church of God, who have been delivered of her pains, and brought forth the kingdom of our God and his christ." Two rather simple points emerge here: the woman is "the church of God," and the child she brings forth is "the kingdom of our God and his christ." These identifications call for some comment.
At the very least, this much can be said: John's vision, as Joseph translates it, is of a woman clothed with the sun, standing on the moon, and crowned with the stars, who pains to give birth, eventually bringing forth a son, and this process is to be understood as "the church of God" giving birth to "the kingdom of our God and his christ." In short: the Church gives birth to the Kingdom. The very image calls into question the all-too-often suggested identification of the Church and the Kingdom (the Church as the Kingdom of God). In other words, there is the hint here that Joseph here understands the Church to be something other than the Kingdom, to be something closely tied to the Kingdom, but something other than it (even its Other).
To make sense of the image, one might turn to the architecture of the earliest Latter-day Saint temples. The Nauvoo temple, like the Salt Lake temple, was an amalgamation of celestial symbolism, carved into the very stone of the temple. Each stone pillar was clothed with the sun, stood on the moon, and the whole building was crowned with stars. The same is true of the Salt Lake temple now. The hint: the temple is the woman, and hence, apparently, also "the church of God." This suggests further, then, that what is going on inside the temple is the slow development of the Kingdom, the preparation of the Kingdom that is eventually to come forth and to begin a separate existence, over and against the Church. If the temple embodies the Church, and within the temple the development of the Kingdom is afoot, then there is here a hint at how Joseph understood the Kingdom to be related to the Church: the Church is a vehicle for the emergence of the Kingdom, is the very womb in which it takes shape, but from which it must eventually part. In short, the Kingdom must eventually outstrip the Church--and it is probably for this reason so important that the "child was caught up unto God, and to his throne" (verse 5).
These preliminary comments perhaps open the way for discussing the rearrangement of the verses in the JST, the discussion of which should open the way for discussing the actual content of each of the verses as they sit in the NT.
  • Rev 13:18: 666. Many people have tried to tie the number "666" to specific historical figures. A different way to approach the number is not as six hundred sixty six (666), but as a sequence of three sixes (6-6-6). Approached in this way, the number could generically stand for three of something, which signifies presiding or being in charge, and that this something is 6, which stands for imperfection or evil (being just less than a complete or perfect 7), or in other words three 6's could simply mean the head of evil.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20

Subpages: Verses 20:1-16 Verses 20:17-37 Verses 20:38-67 Verses 20:68-84

Previous section: D&C 19                         Next section: D&C 21


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Summary[edit]

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  • D&C 20 is not addressed to any individual or group in particular. It instead reads like an impersonal creed or constitution.
  • Story. D&C 20 consists of four major sections:

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received: 10 April 1830 at Fayette, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 21
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 22

D&C 20 was apparently received in pieces and written in drafts over a lengthy period of time. Oliver's 1829 draft. Likely learned the exact date in late March. No record of it being read at the organizational meeting. Dated in Revelation Book 1 four days later on April 10. Yes read at the first quarterly conference in June 1830.

For a brief overview of D&C 20 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

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A. Authority of the church (20:1-16)

  • the Church was organized on April 6, 1830 in accordance with the commandments and authority of God given to his ordained servants - Amen (1-4)
  • references to the First Vision and angelic visits by Moroni (5-6)
  • the Book of Mormon was translated by the power of God and contains the fullness of the gospel of Jesus Christ (7-9)
  • the Book of Mormon translation and testimony of the Three Witnesses prove that the scriptures are true, that God calls men today, and that God does not change - Amen (10-12)
  • those who accept this work and are faithful shall receive eternal life, while those who reject these many witnesses shall receive condemnation - Amen (13-16)

B. Doctrines of the church (20:17-37)

  • God is eternal, the creator of heaven, earth, and mankind (17-18)
  • man’s transgression of God’s commandments led to the fall (19-20)
  • Christ’s atonement, resurrection, and glorification on the right hand of God (21-24)
  • man may be saved upon faith, baptism, and endurance to the end (25-27)
  • the Holy Ghost bears record of the Father and the Son - Amen (27-28)
  • again, men must have faith, repent, and endure to the end (29)
  • justification and sanctification come by grace, and a caution to beware of falling from grace even after sanctification (30-34)
  • God’s word is true, including John’s Revelation, the holy scriptures, this revelation [D&C 20], and all future revelations - Amen (35-36)
  • baptism is available to those who truly repent with broken hearts and contrite spirits, are willing to take Christ’s name upon them, and are determined to serve him to the end (37)

C. Duties and organization of the priesthood (20:38-67)

  • an apostle is an elder (38)
  • duties of apostles and elders: baptize, ordain, administer the sacrament, confirm and confer the gift of the Holy Ghost, teach, exhort, baptize, watch over the Church, and take the lead of meetings as led by the Holy Ghost and in accordance with the commandments and revelations of God (38-45)
  • duties of priests: teach, exhort, baptize, watch over the Church, preach, visit the house of each member, exhort, ordain, take the lead of meetings if no elder is present, and follow the elders’ lead in all of these duties (46-52)
  • duties of teachers: watch over the Church, be with them and strengthen them, warn, exhort, teach, invite all to come unto Christ, and take the lead of meetings if no elder or priest is present (53-59)
  • duties of deacons: warn, exhort, teach and invite all to come unto Christ (58-59)
  • ordination of priesthood bearers is to be by inspiration of the Holy Ghost (60)
  • elders are to hold quarterly general conferences of the Church and issue certificates of ordination (61-67)

D. Duties and organization of the general church membership (20:68-84)

  • after baptism, members are to be taught in doctrine and are to demonstrate a godly walk before being confirmed as members of the Church and partaking of the sacrament (68-69)
  • parents are to have their children blessed by the elders before the Church (70)
  • the manner of baptizing those who have reached the age of accountability (not specified at 8 years of age until Genesis 17:11 JST is received in February-March 1831) (71-74)
  • the manner and frequency of administering the sacrament (75-79)
  • Church discipline, the sending of branch representatives to conferences, and maintenance of membership records (80-84)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

These links need to be updated to Section 20

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 20 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 20 was included in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants, and in each subsequent edition.
  • There have been several significant changes to the text of D&C 20, particularly in the portions that now address priesthood offices revealed after 1830:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 20.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Subpages: Verses 20:1-16 Verses 20:17-37 Verses 20:38-67 Verses 20:68-84
Previous section: D&C 19                         Next section: D&C 21

D&C 20:1-16

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Previous page: Section 20                      Next page: Verses 20:17-37


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:1-16 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:1-16 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:6. This verse brings up the repentance of Joseph. There may be several reasons this was included. One, it may serve to remind those close to him that while he was mortal and at times foolish, he had repented and the Lord saw him as mature enough to receive angels and perform a great work. Two, it may be included as a reminder of God's "grace" (see verse 4). All of us need repentance; and this latter day work is a proclamation of the principles of the gospel. Three, it may serve to give us a simple narrative framework. He received a remission of his sins (the First Vision). Then he was "entangled"(v.5), and felt a need to repent. It was this feeling that led him to pray, which led to the visitation of Moroni (v.6). That visit brought him commandments and power (v.7-8), which led to the translation of the Book of Mormon.
  • D&C 20:8. The phrase in this verse, "the means which were before prepared" likely refers to the Urim and Thummim which was buried by Moroni with the gold plates.
  • D&C 20:9-12. These verses all seem to be connected to the Book of Mormon. The Book of Mormon:
  • is a record of a fallen people (v.9)
  • contains a fulness of the gospel (v.9)
  • is to Gentiles and Jews (v.9)
  • given by inspiration (v.10)
  • confirmed by angels to others, and declared by witnesses to the world (v.10)
  • also proves that the scriptures (the Bible as already received by the world) are true (v.11)
  • proves that God calls men now as He did in past (v.11)
  • this shows that he is the same God yesterday, today, and forever (v.12)
This seems to be one way to read the logic running through these verses.
  • D&C 20:11. One way to read verse 11 is that the Book of Mormon is doing the proving. It proves to the world that "the holy scriptures" - meaning the scriptures the world already has, i.e., the Holy Bible) - are true. See 1 Nephi 13:39-40.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:2-3: Why are Joseph and Oliver called the "first elder" and "second elder"?
  • D&C 20:4: To what does the word “this” refer in the first phrase of this verse? What does it mean to say that something is “according to the grace of our Lord"? What does the phrase “to whom be all glory, both now and forever” mean? What does that phrase tell us?
  • D&C 20:5-12: Notice that this is one long sentence. What’s this sentence as a whole about?
  • D&C 20:5-6: Verse 12 ends the sentence stretching from verses 5-12. There the Lord says "proving to the world that the holy scriptures are true." Here, at the beginning of the same sentence, in verses 5 and 6, the Lord recounts Joseph's sin and repentance. Is the fact that Joseph Smith sinned and then repented part of what proves that the holy scriptures are true? If so, how? If not, why does the Lord bring up Joseph's sin and repentance here?
  • D&C 20:5: What does it mean to receive a remission of sin? How do we get entangled in the vanities of the world? What does “vanities of the world” mean?
  • D&C 20:6: Do we know to what angelic visitation this verse refers?
  • D&C 20:7: How can commandments inspire us?
  • D&C 20:8: We probably all know what “power from on high” means. And we all know what it means to translate the Book of Mormon. But what does it mean that Joseph was given power to translate “by the means which were before prepared"?
  • D&C 20:9: Were the descendants of Lehi the only people in the world who enjoyed the fulness of the gospel between the end of Christ's mortal ministry and the dawning of the dispensation of the fulness of times?
  • D&C 20:10: When this verse says the Book of Mormon was given by inspiration, is it referring to the inspiration the Lord gave the Book of Mormon prophets or to the inspiration he gave Joseph Smith? When the verse says the Book of Mormon “is confirmed to others by the ministering of angels,” of whom is it speaking? Who is it that declares the Book of Mormon to the world?
  • D&C 20:11: Is it the presence of the Book of Mormon that constitutes the proof or the confirmation one receives through the Spirit?
  • D&C 20:12: Did God start out as a God or was there a different God before him?
  • D&C 20:13: What does the pronoun "them" refer to? Does it mean that the world will be judged out of the books (Book of Mormon and Bible)? The witness in this verse would then refer to the Three and Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon and/or perhaps any one who preaches the scriptures to the world.

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 20                      Next page: Verses 20:17-37

D&C 20:17-37

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Previous page: Verses 20:1-16                      Next page: Verses 20:38-67


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:17-37 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:17-37 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:17: Unchangeable. Is this verse saying that our particular Father in Heaven has always been the "same unchangeable God" for us and that no one has ever substituted for him? Why do we believe that once someone becomes perfect, like God, they no longer need to grow, change, or progress?
  • D&C 20:17: Framer. Do we believe that nothing on this planet or in the cosmos is manmade? Or does Alma 11:44 restriction our interpretation by suggesting that God created archetypical patterns for all living things and that these people and creatures will be restored more or less to their original pattern?
  • D&C 20:17: All things which are in them. Why does this verse depart from the phrasing in the Book of Mormon that always occurs as "all things that in them are" or "all things which in them are"? Is this verse evidence of how a scribe or someone else tried to clean up what they thought was improper grammar in the scriptures?
  • D&C 20:32: What does it mean to be in a state of grace--such that it makes sense to say "there is a possibility that man may fall from grace"?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:1-16                      Next page: Verses 20:38-67

D&C 20:68-84

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Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:68-84 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:68-84 include:

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  • D&C 20:75-79: The sacrament prayers. The change in wording from the prayer on the bread to the prayer on the water communicates a profound message about the atonement: it is the Savior who empowers us to do the good we would, but can’t. The prayer on the bread says that we “are willing” to always remember the Savior. The prayer on the water says that we “do” always remember him. Why this change from “willing” to “do”? What does it signify?
One answer is that the change in the sacrament prayers signifies a critically important transition from acting alone to acting in Christ, with the corresponding increase in our capacity for righteousness. Before we bond ourselves to the Savior through broken-hearted contrition, we may have the will but do not have the self -discipline and strength of character to do what we should. After we symbolically make Christ part of us by partaking of the bread, his flesh, “the enabling power of the Atonement” (Elder Bednar) becomes active in our lives, and we have the power to do that which we were willing but unable to do on our own--“always remember him, and keep his commandments which he has given [us]” (D&C 20:77). Thus, the key difference between the prayer on the bread and the prayer on the water is that Christ is not part of us during the first prayer but is during the second because we have now partaken of his flesh.
So the prayer on the bread is about willing, the prayer on the water about doing. And yet, the prayer on the water says only, we “do always remember him,” not that we “do keep his commandments which he has given [us].” Why is there no statement about keeping the commandments in the second prayer? The answer is that such a statement would be redundant. Those who fully and continually remember Christ are born again. They “have no more disposition to do evil, but to do good continually” (Mosiah 5:2). It follows that they "do keep his commandments which he has given them.” Of course, ability to always remember him is itself a gift of grace, as the prayers indicate. We bring to Christ a willing heart. He produces in us a broken-hearted and contrite remembrance of his sacrifice on our behalf, a remembrance that empowers us to keep his commandments and, thus, sanctifies us.
Partaking of the sacrament is a symbolic, not a magical act. So there is no suggestion in this analysis that there is an actual transition from will to act that occurs after one eats the bread but before one drinks the water. The suggestion is that the sacrament prayers and the partaking of the bread and water quite precisely and beautifully signify the process by which the atonement sanctifies a willing soul.

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D&C 21:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 21 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

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  • What does the phrase "gates of hell" mean? Why the reference to gates?

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D&C 21:6-12

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For a brief overview of D&C 21 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

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  • What does the phrase "gates of hell" mean? Why the reference to gates?

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 27:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

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  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28

D&C 27:6-10

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
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For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 27:11-15

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Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 28

For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 27:16-18

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 27
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 28

For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 65:1-6

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 66
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 1

For a brief overview of D&C 65 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 65 is __.
  • D&C 65 was first published in __.
  • D&C 65 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 65:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 65.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 66                         Next section: D&C 1


D&C 115:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 115
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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 115 is __.
  • D&C 115 was first published in __.
  • D&C 115 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 115:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 115.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 115:5-6. Boyd K. Packer, "A Defense and a Refuge," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 85–88. Elder Packer said: "The standard, established by revelation, is contained in the scriptures through the doctrines of the gospel of Jesus Christ. The principles of the gospel life we follow are based on doctrine, and the standards accord with the principles. We are bound to the standards by covenant, as administered through the ordinances of the gospel... [W]e are not free to alter the standards or to ignore them. We must live by them."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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