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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


D&C 13:1-1

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 13
Previous section: D&C 9                         Next section: D&C 10b


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Summary[edit]

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  • D&C 13 is the text of the prayer pronounced by John the Baptist ordaining Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery to the Aaronic Priesthood.

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received: 15 May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 9
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

In the Manuscript History, the revelation explaining to Oliver Cowdery why he was unable to translate (D&C 9) is followed by:

We still continued the work of translation. And in the ensuing month of (May 1829) on a certain day we went into the woods to pray and enquire of the Lord respecting baptism for the remission of sins spoken of in the translation of the plates. While we were thus praying and calling upon the name of the Lord, a messenger [John the Baptist] descended in a cloud of light from heaven and having laid his hands upon us ordained us saying: [D&C 13]. (Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 34-35).

For a brief overview of D&C 13 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 13: What does it mean that the Aaronic Priesthood holds the keys to the ministering of angels?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • D&C 13 was first published as part of the serial publication of the History of Joseph Smith in the Times & Seasons newspaper at Nauvoo on 1 August 1842 (Vol. 3, No. 19, p. 865).
  • D&C 13 was not included in the Doctrine & Covenants until the 1876 edition that was published a year before Brigham Young's death.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 13.

  • D&C 13 is one of several sections that were added to the Doctrine & Covenants for the 1876 edition, along with D&C 2, D&C 110, and D&C 132. These additions cause the Doctrine & Covenants to begin with Malachi's promise in D&C 2 that Elijah will return and restore the priesthood sealing keys and an account in D&C 13 of John restoring the first set of preparatory keys, and to finish with an account of the fulfillment of Malachi's promise in D&C 110 and with discussions of the exercise of those keys through proxy baptism in D&C 127 and D&C 128 and eternal marriage in D&C 132 (further bookended by the Preface in D&C 1 and the Appendix in D&C 133).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • President Faust touched on the ministering of angels in the Priesthood Session of April Conference 2006 "A Royal Priesthood." Of particular interest may be a quote from Joseph F. Smith in the seventh paragraph.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 9                         Next section: D&C 10b


D&C 20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20

Subpages: Verses 20:1-16 Verses 20:17-37 Verses 20:38-67 Verses 20:68-84

Previous section: D&C 19                         Next section: D&C 21


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Summary[edit]

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  • D&C 20 is not addressed to any individual or group in particular. It instead reads like an impersonal creed or constitution.
  • Story. D&C 20 consists of four major sections:

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received: 10 April 1830 at Fayette, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 21
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 22

D&C 20 was apparently received in pieces and written in drafts over a lengthy period of time. Oliver's 1829 draft. Likely learned the exact date in late March. No record of it being read at the organizational meeting. Dated in Revelation Book 1 four days later on April 10. Yes read at the first quarterly conference in June 1830.

For a brief overview of D&C 20 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

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A. Authority of the church (20:1-16)

  • the Church was organized on April 6, 1830 in accordance with the commandments and authority of God given to his ordained servants - Amen (1-4)
  • references to the First Vision and angelic visits by Moroni (5-6)
  • the Book of Mormon was translated by the power of God and contains the fullness of the gospel of Jesus Christ (7-9)
  • the Book of Mormon translation and testimony of the Three Witnesses prove that the scriptures are true, that God calls men today, and that God does not change - Amen (10-12)
  • those who accept this work and are faithful shall receive eternal life, while those who reject these many witnesses shall receive condemnation - Amen (13-16)

B. Doctrines of the church (20:17-37)

  • God is eternal, the creator of heaven, earth, and mankind (17-18)
  • man’s transgression of God’s commandments led to the fall (19-20)
  • Christ’s atonement, resurrection, and glorification on the right hand of God (21-24)
  • man may be saved upon faith, baptism, and endurance to the end (25-27)
  • the Holy Ghost bears record of the Father and the Son - Amen (27-28)
  • again, men must have faith, repent, and endure to the end (29)
  • justification and sanctification come by grace, and a caution to beware of falling from grace even after sanctification (30-34)
  • God’s word is true, including John’s Revelation, the holy scriptures, this revelation [D&C 20], and all future revelations - Amen (35-36)
  • baptism is available to those who truly repent with broken hearts and contrite spirits, are willing to take Christ’s name upon them, and are determined to serve him to the end (37)

C. Duties and organization of the priesthood (20:38-67)

  • an apostle is an elder (38)
  • duties of apostles and elders: baptize, ordain, administer the sacrament, confirm and confer the gift of the Holy Ghost, teach, exhort, baptize, watch over the Church, and take the lead of meetings as led by the Holy Ghost and in accordance with the commandments and revelations of God (38-45)
  • duties of priests: teach, exhort, baptize, watch over the Church, preach, visit the house of each member, exhort, ordain, take the lead of meetings if no elder is present, and follow the elders’ lead in all of these duties (46-52)
  • duties of teachers: watch over the Church, be with them and strengthen them, warn, exhort, teach, invite all to come unto Christ, and take the lead of meetings if no elder or priest is present (53-59)
  • duties of deacons: warn, exhort, teach and invite all to come unto Christ (58-59)
  • ordination of priesthood bearers is to be by inspiration of the Holy Ghost (60)
  • elders are to hold quarterly general conferences of the Church and issue certificates of ordination (61-67)

D. Duties and organization of the general church membership (20:68-84)

  • after baptism, members are to be taught in doctrine and are to demonstrate a godly walk before being confirmed as members of the Church and partaking of the sacrament (68-69)
  • parents are to have their children blessed by the elders before the Church (70)
  • the manner of baptizing those who have reached the age of accountability (not specified at 8 years of age until Genesis 17:11 JST is received in February-March 1831) (71-74)
  • the manner and frequency of administering the sacrament (75-79)
  • Church discipline, the sending of branch representatives to conferences, and maintenance of membership records (80-84)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

These links need to be updated to Section 20

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 20 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 20 was included in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants, and in each subsequent edition.
  • There have been several significant changes to the text of D&C 20, particularly in the portions that now address priesthood offices revealed after 1830:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 20.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Subpages: Verses 20:1-16 Verses 20:17-37 Verses 20:38-67 Verses 20:68-84
Previous section: D&C 19                         Next section: D&C 21

D&C 20:38-67

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


D&C 27:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 27
Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28


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Summary[edit]

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Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 28

For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28


D&C 42:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 42 > Verses 42:43-55
Previous page: Verses 42:30-42                      Next page: Verses 42:56-93


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 42. The relationship of Verses 42:43-55 to the rest of Section 42 is discussed at D&C 42.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 42:43-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 42:43, 48, 52: The sick. Here are some half-done thoughts if someone wants to take them up. Verse 43, 48, and 52 set up some clues as what D&C 42 is explaining about the sick:
  • Verse 42 explains that the idle won't receive the same blessings. Then we move directly into 43's discussion of the sick. This suggests that those who are sick-and-idle aren't grouped into those who are idle (see verse 52 as well).
  • Verse 43 begins discussion of those who are sick, but have not faith to be healed. The point of calling the elders here seems to be to consecrate their illnesses or their deaths to God. Even if they are sick, and have not faith, they with their illnesses will "live unto God," and remain a part of the community (see again verse 52).
  • Verse 48 begins discussion of those who do have faith to be healed.
  • The focus of verses 49-51 is on those who are afflicted, not sick.
  • Verse 52 echoes verses 43-44: even if they have not faith, in Zion we bear their infirmities with them.
  • D&C 42:44. In context, this verse, like the one before it (and the end of verse 52), is specifically explaining how the church should deal with those who believe and are sick but have not faith to be healed. It is for them that the elders of the church are to be called. Why isn't this direction to call the elders given for all who are sick? It may be that these verses suggest that "all the sick" and "the sick without faith to be healed" are really the same group because everyone with faith is already healed. But is that right--does everyone with faith get healed?
When much the same thing is repeated in verse 48 an additional caveat is added "and is not appointed unto death." This possibility is then recognized--that one may have faith, but be sick because one is appointed unto death. But what of those who are sick, but not with something that leads to death? Is this verse suggesting that all of them are sick because they lack the faith to be healed?
Given how verse 44 ends, we might assume that such sick people aren't at issue. That what is under discussion are those with grave sicknesses--the type where we would expect one to die and this is why the end of verse 44 ends by talking about whether the person lives or dies--not about whether they are healed.
Verses 49-53, however, suggest this isn't so. All of the sicknesses used as examples are specifically not the type we would expect someone to die from (being blind, being deaf, being lame). What then do we make of the end of verse 44, the discussion of living and dying rather than of being healed or not? One interpretation of this is that healing is not spoken of because, in the previous verse, it has already been established that this is a group of people who have not faith to be healed. The problem with this interpretation is that it leaves no place for healing by the laying on of hands. It sees people as either faithful and therefore already healed with no need to call the elders or faithless and beyond hope of being healed. This interpretation goes against both other scriptures and common experience which suggests that healing is provided through the laying on of hands.
In any case, what is clear from the ending of verse 44, is that the important point in this context isn't that the elders are called to heal (though they may do that) but rather that they are called to seal the sick to Christ. Or, to put it another way, to re-affirm the sick's commitment to Christ through prayer and the laying on of hands. As is made clear here, verses 45-47 and 52, this is more important than whether or not one is healed.
We might see these verses as providing some answers to the questions that arise from the facts that on the one hand we have scriptures which promise that those who ask with faith will receive, but on the other hand we see so many good people who ask to be healed but remain sick. In this context these verses a) reaffirm the truth of the statement generally that they would be healed with sufficient faith b) add an additional caveat that some are appointed unto death c) reassure us that not having faith to be healed doesn't mean that one can't become Christ's sons d) remind us that we have a responsibility to care for those who are sick.
  • D&C 42:45: Weeping for the dead. The Lord makes it clear that it is appropriate that we weep for them that die. It is natural that we weep for those who we love and God makes it clear that we are to love. The command here is to love so much that we weep when a friend dies.
Interestingly we are specifically told to weep especially for "those that have not hope of a glorious resurrection." What does this criteria mean?
The meaning changes depending on whether we take the wording "those that have not" to suggest (a) that the person who died, themselves, didn't have hope of a glorious resurrection, or whether we think it means (b) the person who died isn't justified in hoping for a glorious resurrection.
(a) is interesting in its emphasis on someone's own hope. We presume that we are to mourn more for those who do not hope for a glorious resurrection than those who do because, in each case, their lack of hope is actually correct. In contrast, we might compare this with Matt 25:31-46 which talks specifically about those who misjudge their approaching judgment. (b) is also interesting because it assumes we are in a position to judge whether someone has any hope of a a glorious resurrection.
It also isn't clear how this verse's interpretation should be influenced by the fact that the Lord will provide a way to accept the gospel to all after death who didn't have a chance to receive it in this life.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 43:11-15

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Historical setting[edit]

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For a brief overview of D&C 43 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 43 is __.
  • D&C 43 was first published in __.
  • D&C 43 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
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Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 43.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 43:16-20

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For a brief overview of D&C 43 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 43 is __.
  • D&C 43 was first published in __.
  • D&C 43 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 43:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 43.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 78:11-15

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This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 78:3. Why had the time come to establish a storehouse for the poor?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the historical circumstances that made that necessary?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the spiritual circumstances?
  • D&C 78:3. Do verses 4-5 explain why it was necessary?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why is equality in both heavenly and earthly things necessary if we wish to obtain heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why does inequality in earthly things prevent us from equally obtaining heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:6. For questions on verse 6, see verse 5.
  • D&C 78:11-12. How seriously does the Lord take the covenant that establishes the order of this storehouse?
  • D&C 78:11-12. What does that say to us about our responsibilities to the poor?
  • D&C 78:17-18. What does the Lord mean when he says the saints are as little children?
  • D&C 78:17-18. These verses mention two attributes of children, the inability to understand the blessings prepared and the inability to bear all things. How do they apply to us?
  • D&C 78:19. Why is thankfulness so essential to being made glorious?
  • D&C 78:19. What does it mean to be made glorious? To what might the Lord be referring?
  • D&C 78:22. What is the significance of this promise in the context of this particular revelation?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 78 is __.
  • D&C 78 was first published in __.
  • D&C 78 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 78:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 78.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 78:16-22

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 78:3. Why had the time come to establish a storehouse for the poor?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the historical circumstances that made that necessary?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the spiritual circumstances?
  • D&C 78:3. Do verses 4-5 explain why it was necessary?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why is equality in both heavenly and earthly things necessary if we wish to obtain heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why does inequality in earthly things prevent us from equally obtaining heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:6. For questions on verse 6, see verse 5.
  • D&C 78:11-12. How seriously does the Lord take the covenant that establishes the order of this storehouse?
  • D&C 78:11-12. What does that say to us about our responsibilities to the poor?
  • D&C 78:17-18. What does the Lord mean when he says the saints are as little children?
  • D&C 78:17-18. These verses mention two attributes of children, the inability to understand the blessings prepared and the inability to bear all things. How do they apply to us?
  • D&C 78:19. Why is thankfulness so essential to being made glorious?
  • D&C 78:19. What does it mean to be made glorious? To what might the Lord be referring?
  • D&C 78:22. What is the significance of this promise in the context of this particular revelation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 78 is __.
  • D&C 78 was first published in __.
  • D&C 78 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 78:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 78.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 81:1-7

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  • Jesse Gause. BYU Studies published articles on Jesse Gause in 1975 and 1983.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 81: To counselors This revelation was originally given for Jesse Gause, who was replaced by Frederick G. Williams as a counselor to Joseph Smith in early 1833. This suggests that the revelation is a general one to counselors in the First Presidency rather than to Jesse Gause or to Frederick Williams as an individual.

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  • What can counselors in the church, at whatever level, learn about their callings from this revelation?

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 81:3. What does it mean to be "faithful in council"?

Resources[edit]

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  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 81 is __.
  • D&C 81 was first published in __.
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  • Changes to the text of D&C 81:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 81.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

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Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 79                         Next section: D&C 82


D&C 84:6-10

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:1-30 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:1-30 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:4-5: This generation. The phrase "this generation" as used here is generally interpreted to be equivalent to the phrase "this dispensation" and covers the time period from the restoration to some time around second coming. This interpretation is also used in D&C 5:10.
  • D&C 84:6ff: Genealogy. What is the purpose of including a long genealogy of priesthood authority?
  • D&C 84:17ff: The introduction of two priesthoods. Beginning with verse 17 and running through about verse 30 is the passage in which the two-tiered structure of the priesthood is introduced to the Latter-day Saints. A number of interesting details here deserve attention. It should be noted that the two prieshtoods are never described as the Melchizedek and Aaronic priesthoods: those "titles" would not be introduced into the Church as a whole until 1834-1835. The several offices of the Church are tied to the separate priesthoods for the first time as well (the Church seems to have understood all offices to belong to a kind of general priesthood until the revelation of the office of high priest in 1831; even after that and until this generation, the office of elder, for example, was understood to be an office of the lesser priesthood). The relationship between the two priesthoods, in this first introduction, is very clearly rooted in the Old Testament temple experience: the keys and powers of the priests and high priests are understood as connected with the duties and responsibilities of priests and high priests as outlined in the Pentateuch. The two priesthoods are introduced as at once permanently interconnected and yet founded by a particular ancient event. The two priesthoods are presented in skeleton form (priests and high priests) to which other "appendages" are attached. And all of this is rooted in an at once rather traditional and marvelously radical understanding of the Moses-to-John-the-Baptist story.
What all of these interesting details suggest, when brought together, is that the introduction of the two priesthoods as such is profoundly rooted in the Bible, in a kind of return to the Biblical way of being, though it offers up an undeniably unique hermeneutic on that scripture as a whole. In other words, this passage can be taken as a kind of reinterpretation of the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, one that is uniquely Mormon. The story it presents, of course, is quite familiar: it breaks ancient history up into three parts, namely, the pre-Mosaic era of the Melchizedek priesthood, the Mosaic era of the Aaronic priesthood, and the Christian era of restoration of the Melchizedek priesthood. And yet, the picture as it is presented is not quite so simple as this: though this picture is a good place to start, there is inevitably a great deal more happening here. For example, and just by way of introduction, it is important to note that the high priesthood—understood here as tied to the office of high priest—is not done away with or completely removed with the historical institution of the Aaronic priesthood; rather, it is limited in that high priests are far fewer in number and the office is no longer open to just anyone (though one should well ask whether it was so open before Moses either). The story, in a word, is obviously more complex than it might first appear.
  • D&C 84:19: Mysteries. It appears the phrase "mysteries of the kingdom" is equivalent to "knowledge of God" in this verse.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:16. How was the priesthood passed from Abel to Enoch? Does this imply that Abel had and ordained his posterity before he was killed? Why is Abel listed here, rather than Seth?
  • D&C 84:17. What does it mean that the priesthood is "without beginning of days or end of years?"
  • D&C 84:19. What does it mean that the Melchizedek priesthood holds the key of the mysteries of the kingdom?
  • D&C 84:20. Why does the verse begin with the word "therefore"?
  • D&C 84:20. What does it mean that the power of godliness is present in the ordinances?
  • D&C 84:20. What does "the power of godliness" mean?
  • D&C 84:22. To what does the word "this" refer? To the priesthood? To the ordinances? To the power of godliness?
  • D&C 84:24-25. How does removing the priesthood from the children of Israel remove them from the Lord's rest, the fullness of his glory?
  • D&C 84:24-25. What does "the Lord's rest" or "the fulness of his glory" mean?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 84:11-15

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:1-30 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:1-30 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:4-5: This generation. The phrase "this generation" as used here is generally interpreted to be equivalent to the phrase "this dispensation" and covers the time period from the restoration to some time around second coming. This interpretation is also used in D&C 5:10.
  • D&C 84:6ff: Genealogy. What is the purpose of including a long genealogy of priesthood authority?
  • D&C 84:17ff: The introduction of two priesthoods. Beginning with verse 17 and running through about verse 30 is the passage in which the two-tiered structure of the priesthood is introduced to the Latter-day Saints. A number of interesting details here deserve attention. It should be noted that the two prieshtoods are never described as the Melchizedek and Aaronic priesthoods: those "titles" would not be introduced into the Church as a whole until 1834-1835. The several offices of the Church are tied to the separate priesthoods for the first time as well (the Church seems to have understood all offices to belong to a kind of general priesthood until the revelation of the office of high priest in 1831; even after that and until this generation, the office of elder, for example, was understood to be an office of the lesser priesthood). The relationship between the two priesthoods, in this first introduction, is very clearly rooted in the Old Testament temple experience: the keys and powers of the priests and high priests are understood as connected with the duties and responsibilities of priests and high priests as outlined in the Pentateuch. The two priesthoods are introduced as at once permanently interconnected and yet founded by a particular ancient event. The two priesthoods are presented in skeleton form (priests and high priests) to which other "appendages" are attached. And all of this is rooted in an at once rather traditional and marvelously radical understanding of the Moses-to-John-the-Baptist story.
What all of these interesting details suggest, when brought together, is that the introduction of the two priesthoods as such is profoundly rooted in the Bible, in a kind of return to the Biblical way of being, though it offers up an undeniably unique hermeneutic on that scripture as a whole. In other words, this passage can be taken as a kind of reinterpretation of the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, one that is uniquely Mormon. The story it presents, of course, is quite familiar: it breaks ancient history up into three parts, namely, the pre-Mosaic era of the Melchizedek priesthood, the Mosaic era of the Aaronic priesthood, and the Christian era of restoration of the Melchizedek priesthood. And yet, the picture as it is presented is not quite so simple as this: though this picture is a good place to start, there is inevitably a great deal more happening here. For example, and just by way of introduction, it is important to note that the high priesthood—understood here as tied to the office of high priest—is not done away with or completely removed with the historical institution of the Aaronic priesthood; rather, it is limited in that high priests are far fewer in number and the office is no longer open to just anyone (though one should well ask whether it was so open before Moses either). The story, in a word, is obviously more complex than it might first appear.
  • D&C 84:19: Mysteries. It appears the phrase "mysteries of the kingdom" is equivalent to "knowledge of God" in this verse.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:16. How was the priesthood passed from Abel to Enoch? Does this imply that Abel had and ordained his posterity before he was killed? Why is Abel listed here, rather than Seth?
  • D&C 84:17. What does it mean that the priesthood is "without beginning of days or end of years?"
  • D&C 84:19. What does it mean that the Melchizedek priesthood holds the key of the mysteries of the kingdom?
  • D&C 84:20. Why does the verse begin with the word "therefore"?
  • D&C 84:20. What does it mean that the power of godliness is present in the ordinances?
  • D&C 84:20. What does "the power of godliness" mean?
  • D&C 84:22. To what does the word "this" refer? To the priesthood? To the ordinances? To the power of godliness?
  • D&C 84:24-25. How does removing the priesthood from the children of Israel remove them from the Lord's rest, the fullness of his glory?
  • D&C 84:24-25. What does "the Lord's rest" or "the fulness of his glory" mean?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42

D&C 84:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:1-30
Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:1-30 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:1-30 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:4-5: This generation. The phrase "this generation" as used here is generally interpreted to be equivalent to the phrase "this dispensation" and covers the time period from the restoration to some time around second coming. This interpretation is also used in D&C 5:10.
  • D&C 84:6ff: Genealogy. What is the purpose of including a long genealogy of priesthood authority?
  • D&C 84:17ff: The introduction of two priesthoods. Beginning with verse 17 and running through about verse 30 is the passage in which the two-tiered structure of the priesthood is introduced to the Latter-day Saints. A number of interesting details here deserve attention. It should be noted that the two prieshtoods are never described as the Melchizedek and Aaronic priesthoods: those "titles" would not be introduced into the Church as a whole until 1834-1835. The several offices of the Church are tied to the separate priesthoods for the first time as well (the Church seems to have understood all offices to belong to a kind of general priesthood until the revelation of the office of high priest in 1831; even after that and until this generation, the office of elder, for example, was understood to be an office of the lesser priesthood). The relationship between the two priesthoods, in this first introduction, is very clearly rooted in the Old Testament temple experience: the keys and powers of the priests and high priests are understood as connected with the duties and responsibilities of priests and high priests as outlined in the Pentateuch. The two priesthoods are introduced as at once permanently interconnected and yet founded by a particular ancient event. The two priesthoods are presented in skeleton form (priests and high priests) to which other "appendages" are attached. And all of this is rooted in an at once rather traditional and marvelously radical understanding of the Moses-to-John-the-Baptist story.
What all of these interesting details suggest, when brought together, is that the introduction of the two priesthoods as such is profoundly rooted in the Bible, in a kind of return to the Biblical way of being, though it offers up an undeniably unique hermeneutic on that scripture as a whole. In other words, this passage can be taken as a kind of reinterpretation of the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, one that is uniquely Mormon. The story it presents, of course, is quite familiar: it breaks ancient history up into three parts, namely, the pre-Mosaic era of the Melchizedek priesthood, the Mosaic era of the Aaronic priesthood, and the Christian era of restoration of the Melchizedek priesthood. And yet, the picture as it is presented is not quite so simple as this: though this picture is a good place to start, there is inevitably a great deal more happening here. For example, and just by way of introduction, it is important to note that the high priesthood—understood here as tied to the office of high priest—is not done away with or completely removed with the historical institution of the Aaronic priesthood; rather, it is limited in that high priests are far fewer in number and the office is no longer open to just anyone (though one should well ask whether it was so open before Moses either). The story, in a word, is obviously more complex than it might first appear.
  • D&C 84:19: Mysteries. It appears the phrase "mysteries of the kingdom" is equivalent to "knowledge of God" in this verse.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:16. How was the priesthood passed from Abel to Enoch? Does this imply that Abel had and ordained his posterity before he was killed? Why is Abel listed here, rather than Seth?
  • D&C 84:17. What does it mean that the priesthood is "without beginning of days or end of years?"
  • D&C 84:19. What does it mean that the Melchizedek priesthood holds the key of the mysteries of the kingdom?
  • D&C 84:20. Why does the verse begin with the word "therefore"?
  • D&C 84:20. What does it mean that the power of godliness is present in the ordinances?
  • D&C 84:20. What does "the power of godliness" mean?
  • D&C 84:22. To what does the word "this" refer? To the priesthood? To the ordinances? To the power of godliness?
  • D&C 84:24-25. How does removing the priesthood from the children of Israel remove them from the Lord's rest, the fullness of his glory?
  • D&C 84:24-25. What does "the Lord's rest" or "the fulness of his glory" mean?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42

D&C 84:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:1-30
Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:1-30 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:1-30 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:4-5: This generation. The phrase "this generation" as used here is generally interpreted to be equivalent to the phrase "this dispensation" and covers the time period from the restoration to some time around second coming. This interpretation is also used in D&C 5:10.
  • D&C 84:6ff: Genealogy. What is the purpose of including a long genealogy of priesthood authority?
  • D&C 84:17ff: The introduction of two priesthoods. Beginning with verse 17 and running through about verse 30 is the passage in which the two-tiered structure of the priesthood is introduced to the Latter-day Saints. A number of interesting details here deserve attention. It should be noted that the two prieshtoods are never described as the Melchizedek and Aaronic priesthoods: those "titles" would not be introduced into the Church as a whole until 1834-1835. The several offices of the Church are tied to the separate priesthoods for the first time as well (the Church seems to have understood all offices to belong to a kind of general priesthood until the revelation of the office of high priest in 1831; even after that and until this generation, the office of elder, for example, was understood to be an office of the lesser priesthood). The relationship between the two priesthoods, in this first introduction, is very clearly rooted in the Old Testament temple experience: the keys and powers of the priests and high priests are understood as connected with the duties and responsibilities of priests and high priests as outlined in the Pentateuch. The two priesthoods are introduced as at once permanently interconnected and yet founded by a particular ancient event. The two priesthoods are presented in skeleton form (priests and high priests) to which other "appendages" are attached. And all of this is rooted in an at once rather traditional and marvelously radical understanding of the Moses-to-John-the-Baptist story.
What all of these interesting details suggest, when brought together, is that the introduction of the two priesthoods as such is profoundly rooted in the Bible, in a kind of return to the Biblical way of being, though it offers up an undeniably unique hermeneutic on that scripture as a whole. In other words, this passage can be taken as a kind of reinterpretation of the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, one that is uniquely Mormon. The story it presents, of course, is quite familiar: it breaks ancient history up into three parts, namely, the pre-Mosaic era of the Melchizedek priesthood, the Mosaic era of the Aaronic priesthood, and the Christian era of restoration of the Melchizedek priesthood. And yet, the picture as it is presented is not quite so simple as this: though this picture is a good place to start, there is inevitably a great deal more happening here. For example, and just by way of introduction, it is important to note that the high priesthood—understood here as tied to the office of high priest—is not done away with or completely removed with the historical institution of the Aaronic priesthood; rather, it is limited in that high priests are far fewer in number and the office is no longer open to just anyone (though one should well ask whether it was so open before Moses either). The story, in a word, is obviously more complex than it might first appear.
  • D&C 84:19: Mysteries. It appears the phrase "mysteries of the kingdom" is equivalent to "knowledge of God" in this verse.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:16. How was the priesthood passed from Abel to Enoch? Does this imply that Abel had and ordained his posterity before he was killed? Why is Abel listed here, rather than Seth?
  • D&C 84:17. What does it mean that the priesthood is "without beginning of days or end of years?"
  • D&C 84:19. What does it mean that the Melchizedek priesthood holds the key of the mysteries of the kingdom?
  • D&C 84:20. Why does the verse begin with the word "therefore"?
  • D&C 84:20. What does it mean that the power of godliness is present in the ordinances?
  • D&C 84:20. What does "the power of godliness" mean?
  • D&C 84:22. To what does the word "this" refer? To the priesthood? To the ordinances? To the power of godliness?
  • D&C 84:24-25. How does removing the priesthood from the children of Israel remove them from the Lord's rest, the fullness of his glory?
  • D&C 84:24-25. What does "the Lord's rest" or "the fulness of his glory" mean?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42

D&C 84:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:1-30
Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:1-30 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:1-30 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:4-5: This generation. The phrase "this generation" as used here is generally interpreted to be equivalent to the phrase "this dispensation" and covers the time period from the restoration to some time around second coming. This interpretation is also used in D&C 5:10.
  • D&C 84:6ff: Genealogy. What is the purpose of including a long genealogy of priesthood authority?
  • D&C 84:17ff: The introduction of two priesthoods. Beginning with verse 17 and running through about verse 30 is the passage in which the two-tiered structure of the priesthood is introduced to the Latter-day Saints. A number of interesting details here deserve attention. It should be noted that the two prieshtoods are never described as the Melchizedek and Aaronic priesthoods: those "titles" would not be introduced into the Church as a whole until 1834-1835. The several offices of the Church are tied to the separate priesthoods for the first time as well (the Church seems to have understood all offices to belong to a kind of general priesthood until the revelation of the office of high priest in 1831; even after that and until this generation, the office of elder, for example, was understood to be an office of the lesser priesthood). The relationship between the two priesthoods, in this first introduction, is very clearly rooted in the Old Testament temple experience: the keys and powers of the priests and high priests are understood as connected with the duties and responsibilities of priests and high priests as outlined in the Pentateuch. The two priesthoods are introduced as at once permanently interconnected and yet founded by a particular ancient event. The two priesthoods are presented in skeleton form (priests and high priests) to which other "appendages" are attached. And all of this is rooted in an at once rather traditional and marvelously radical understanding of the Moses-to-John-the-Baptist story.
What all of these interesting details suggest, when brought together, is that the introduction of the two priesthoods as such is profoundly rooted in the Bible, in a kind of return to the Biblical way of being, though it offers up an undeniably unique hermeneutic on that scripture as a whole. In other words, this passage can be taken as a kind of reinterpretation of the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, one that is uniquely Mormon. The story it presents, of course, is quite familiar: it breaks ancient history up into three parts, namely, the pre-Mosaic era of the Melchizedek priesthood, the Mosaic era of the Aaronic priesthood, and the Christian era of restoration of the Melchizedek priesthood. And yet, the picture as it is presented is not quite so simple as this: though this picture is a good place to start, there is inevitably a great deal more happening here. For example, and just by way of introduction, it is important to note that the high priesthood—understood here as tied to the office of high priest—is not done away with or completely removed with the historical institution of the Aaronic priesthood; rather, it is limited in that high priests are far fewer in number and the office is no longer open to just anyone (though one should well ask whether it was so open before Moses either). The story, in a word, is obviously more complex than it might first appear.
  • D&C 84:19: Mysteries. It appears the phrase "mysteries of the kingdom" is equivalent to "knowledge of God" in this verse.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:16. How was the priesthood passed from Abel to Enoch? Does this imply that Abel had and ordained his posterity before he was killed? Why is Abel listed here, rather than Seth?
  • D&C 84:17. What does it mean that the priesthood is "without beginning of days or end of years?"
  • D&C 84:19. What does it mean that the Melchizedek priesthood holds the key of the mysteries of the kingdom?
  • D&C 84:20. Why does the verse begin with the word "therefore"?
  • D&C 84:20. What does it mean that the power of godliness is present in the ordinances?
  • D&C 84:20. What does "the power of godliness" mean?
  • D&C 84:22. To what does the word "this" refer? To the priesthood? To the ordinances? To the power of godliness?
  • D&C 84:24-25. How does removing the priesthood from the children of Israel remove them from the Lord's rest, the fullness of his glory?
  • D&C 84:24-25. What does "the Lord's rest" or "the fulness of his glory" mean?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 84                      Next page: Verses 84:31-42

D&C 84:111-115

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:60-120
Previous page: Verses 84:43-59                      This is the last page for Section 84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:60-120 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:60-120 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:61. Here the Lord takes up what might be read as an implication of verse 57 (see commentary there) and renders it a commandment: "not only to say, but to do" here becomes "remain steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer, in bearing testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you." It is key that with the fulfillment of this one commandment, the sins (the darkened minds, the slighting of the scriptures, etc.) of the saints are to be forgiven. The one commandment is, however, not quite so simple as just "preaching the word." What the Lord seems to be commanding the saints to do specifically is to proclaim the gospel in a certain way, as guided, that is, by remaining "steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer." What this means must be worked out, and the working out must be guided by the preliminary commentary worked out at verse 57.
The most important point seems to be that the Lord here draws together the word (communication) and the Word (worship or praise): the saints are to declare the word to the world, but they are to do so while constantly presenting themselves before the Word. The work of proclaiming the gospel, in other words, is not only a question of making sure that a message gets across. At the same time, neither is it a question only of praying that God accomplishes the work. Perhaps the two tasks--here drawn together--might be better understood by tying them to a distinction drawn in D&C 20:57: vocal prayer vs. secret prayer. In that verse, the priests are commanded to visit the house of the members of the Church and to exhort them to "pray vocally and in secret." The distinction is fruitful: vocal prayer seems primarily to be a question of communal praise, and secret prayer seems primarily to be a question of personal counsel and even--perhaps often--complaint. These two tasks to which one is summoned by the visiting priest might be taken as a guide to thinking the question this verse raises: to "remain steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer" might just be to "pray...in secret," and "bearing testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you" might just be to "pray vocally." In other words, bearing testimony before all the world might well be a question of praise, of going before the world quite simply to praise God in His glory. Remaining in the meanwhile steadfast in solemn prayer might well be, then, the continual work of counseling with and complaining to the Lord. Before men, one praises God; in one's closet, one chides Him.
These two attitudes--which are here drawn together in the same task--might offer an interpretive framework for reading, say, the collective Psalms: there are psalms of complaint (all of which are written in a very personal I-Thou idiom), and there are psalms of praise (all of which involve others in the prayer, as with the constant refrain "Hallelujah," "praise ye the Lord"). What is so peculiar about all of this is that the two tasks are, for all intents and purposes, here drawn together into one task: one is to praise God before the world while counseling with the Lord in secret. The combination calls to mind, perhaps, the double task Paul gives to the Corinthian saints: "Wherefore let him that speaketh in an unknown tongue pray that he may interpret" (1 Cor 14:13). Paul, later in the same chapter, states this task negatively, and perhaps for that reason, more explicitly, more powerfully: "But if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God" (1 Cor 14:28). Two tasks are, according to Paul, to be performed together: prayer directed precisely to God, and words of exhortation directed precisely to the church. In short, faith (private prayer) without works (the communicating word) is dead, and works (the communicating word) without faith (private prayer) is dead.
But perhaps this tie to Paul's discourse on the gift of tongues opens up another way of understanding the double task and the distinction drawn in D&C 20:57: secret prayer might be a question of "the tongue of angels" (2 Ne 31:13) and vocal prayer of "the tongues of men" (1 Cor 13:1). The question might be tied, that is, to themes that pervade Isa 6 and 28: a missionary--one sent specifically by God as Isaiah had been--is one who inhabits two realms, one who has been in the Holy of Holies and yet dwells on earth, one who thus speaks two entirely different tongues (the angelic tongue registering as sheer noise in the earth, and the tongues of men registering as inarticulate cries in the heavens). To do missionary work--and, according to D&C 20:57, patriarchal work--in God's way is, in the end, to be the link between two realms, to be after the order of the Son of God, to be like the Christ who in His very incarnation is the veil that faces both the heavenly and the earthly realms (see Heb 10:20). Perhaps it is for this very reason that missionary work--and fatherhood, for that matter--are questions of priesthood.
  • D&C 84:85. One way to interpret the phrase, "take no thought before hand what ye shall say", which is parallel to vs 81, "take ye no thought for the morrow" is to think about temperance. We have been counseled to "prepare every needful thing." (D&C 88:119) There is a good and appropriate amount of time to spend preparing. Once we have spent that amount of time, it becomes worrying about "what ye shall say." Worrying about what you shall say, shows a lack of trust. Prepare for the morrow, don't worry about the morrow. Prepare for what you shall say, don't go overboard and worry about what ye shall say. Once you are prepared (in whatever form that will take), "treasure up in your minds continually the words of life" and spend your energy and resources living in the present.
If you link the ideas from D&C 88:118-126 (preparing with temperance and above all charity which bonds perfectness and peace (godliness?) and I will receive you.) with these verses 81-85, there are some common themes that possibly connect with ideas in the commentary on 88:51-65 (vanity, turning away from the world in hope for "a better world", breaking improper dichotomies by combining hope with faith that leads to charity and action, drawing together the word (communication) and the Word (worship or praise) to reach the world where and how they can best be reached (which may begin with or without faith), and preparing the world to receive God). D&C 88:118 says that "And as all have not faith, seek ye diligently and teach one another words of wisdom; yea, seek ye out of the best books words of wisdom; seek learning, even by study and also by faith." This seems to reference the same ideas in the commentary on verse 57 of radically distancing the two poles of studying the words of wisdom out of the best books, the best minds of man, the "words of life", experiences of man maybe. I'm hesitant to use the term "philosophies of man" because it can have a negative connotation, but is there a positive side to "the philosophies of man" that we are excluding in our study and use in preaching the gospel, because we see it as opposed to faith? Could these also be included in the "words of life" that we should be treasuring?
Verse 118 tells us that not all have faith. Not having faith does not exclude those people from truth. Truth stands alone, with or without faith because it is eternally truth. For people without faith, we are counseled here to use the "words of wisdom from the best books" available and compliment that with faith. Can we say, "These two attitudes--which are here drawn together in the same task", revealing the truth of God through the "words of life"? Is the Lord asking us to "destroy the dichotomy" and "return to the rigor of the protestant student of the word" combined, not mingled with scripture. (revised from commentary in 88:57)
D&C Sunday School Lesson 13 is entitled, "This Generation Shall Have My Word Through You." The lesson focuses on all the incredible knowledge we have received through Joseph Smith. In likening the scriptures unto us, could D&C 84 be teaching us what we need to do to be an effective instrument in fulfilling our part of the covenant to share God's words to this generation through us? Can we be the angels that are bringing God's word to help bring them to Christ? Can we be the servant that brings forth fruit one hundred fold?

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:85. Are we really all expected to teach this way? If not, then how are we to interpret this verse? In President Ezra Taft Benson's Talk, "The Book of Mormon-Keystone of Our Religion", he references this verse and says that, "The scriptures are called "the words of life". What else could "the words of life" include? How do we "treasure up in your minds continually the words of life"? Are the "words of life" different from the "words of eternal life"? Does this relate to the polarity/dichotomy of sola scritura (the word) (see vs 57 commentary) juxtaposed with life (in the present worldly state) since we have just been counseled in verses 81-84 to take no thought for the morrow, live life in the now.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:21-32
Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:21-32 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:21-32 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:21-32: Beyond characterizing the priesthoods in general. Beginning with verse 21, this revelation radically altered the saints' understanding of the priesthood, systematizing and organizing it so that it might function as a form of government, in addition to its "cultic" role, dwelt upon in the previous verses. Each verse that follows in this revelation is worth very careful consideration: each has had a major impact on the structure of the Church, as well as on the understanding of the priesthood.
The setting is significant. 1835 marks the establishment of church government--an incredibly controversial moment in LDS history now and then ("apostasy" from the Church's organization--as opposed to apostasy from the Church's moral standards or from the contents of a particular revelation--might well be said to center on this very moment of institutionalization, both in Joseph's day and even now). The same year also marks the supersecion of the "Book of Commandments" by the "Doctrine and Covenants," the latter text radically altering the former--most obviously in focus and function, but also in actual wording. More still, 1835 is also marked by the acceleration of the work on the Kirtland House of the Lord, with its accompanying emphasis on priesthood. Though this revelation comes early in the year, all of these events form a sort of aura around it.
Perhaps still more significant is the immediate textual setting: what follows not only marks a sort of "departure" from previous revelations on the priesthood, it makes a "departure"--as it were--from the characterization of the priesthood offered in the previous twenty verses! But this very fact ensures that what follows is not, strictly speaking, a departure. Rather, something is being added--by the Lord, it must be remembered--to the priesthood ("added" might be the best word to be used here: the governmental structure of the priesthood does not appear to be "eternal"; cf. D&C 84:29-30, D&C 107:5). Government for the Church, in other words, is a duty the Lord decided to assign to the priesthood (which, in and of itself, was not of governmental function). All these details, it should be hoped, establish the absolute importance of what begins with verse 21.
  • D&C 107:21. So radical a shift in the role of the priesthood begins with two vital words: "Of necessity...."
  • D&C 107:22. This verse marks the first instance of the word "quorum" in scripture. Besides its numerous appearances in the following verses, it only shows up elsewhere in D&C 124:62 and 117ff. The institutional importance of a word so seldomly used in scripture suggests that these two revelations are vital for understanding the role and development of the structure of the priesthood in terms of government. (If a broad characterization of section 107 as over and against section 124 is justified: section 107 deals with the introduction and grounding of quorums, while section 124 basically only mentions quorums because the revelation provides names for some specific positions in those quorums. In other words, section 107 is "theoretical," whereas section 124 is "practical." However, it should not be missed how much the "practicality" of section 124 establishes the vitality of more "theoretical" section 107: the institutional importance of the quorums of the priesthood is not a late phenomenon, but something that developed rather quickly--within the lifetime of the prophet Joseph.
It is vital to note that in this passage (as it extends through to verse 37), however, the quorums that are discussed are only the quorums that govern the Church in the broadest sense. The word "quorum," then, appears to have been understood in its more "official" sense. In fact, by 1835, the less official senses of the word were mostly obselete (see the OED entry on "quorum"), and the 1828 Webster's dictionary lists only meanings that bear on official practices (all implying, interestingly, a situation of judgment or justice). The establishment at work in these verses is not, it must be understood, the establishment of the hierarchical quorums of the priesthood. Rather, it is the establishment of a governing system of quorums/councils who have the authority to conduct the business of the entire Church. Verse 32 is perhaps the clearest confirmation of this point: these several quorums (apparently meaning only the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Quorum of the Seventy) "constitute the spiritual authorities of the church." In short, this first instance of "quorums" in scripture is an establishment, not of the quorums of the priesthood, but of the quorums of general authorities in the several and balancing levels of authority. Hence when, later in the revelation, the Lord discusses the "quorums" of the priests, teachers, and deacons, He never uses the term "quorum" at all (see verses 85-90, a series of verses quoted there from an otherwise unpublished revelation of November 1831). (It might be noted further that even in D&C 124, there is never mention of a quorum in the Aaronic Priesthood. Though there is some discussion there of the quorum of the elders, the wording is complex, and this might be only a reference to the quorum of the seventy. The implication seems to be that, at least at first, quorums were only a question of the High Priesthood.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a witness of the name of Christ?
  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a special witness of that name?
  • D&C 107:23. Which authorities are special witnesses of Christ?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39

D&C 107:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:21-32
Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:21-32 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:21-32 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:21-32: Beyond characterizing the priesthoods in general. Beginning with verse 21, this revelation radically altered the saints' understanding of the priesthood, systematizing and organizing it so that it might function as a form of government, in addition to its "cultic" role, dwelt upon in the previous verses. Each verse that follows in this revelation is worth very careful consideration: each has had a major impact on the structure of the Church, as well as on the understanding of the priesthood.
The setting is significant. 1835 marks the establishment of church government--an incredibly controversial moment in LDS history now and then ("apostasy" from the Church's organization--as opposed to apostasy from the Church's moral standards or from the contents of a particular revelation--might well be said to center on this very moment of institutionalization, both in Joseph's day and even now). The same year also marks the supersecion of the "Book of Commandments" by the "Doctrine and Covenants," the latter text radically altering the former--most obviously in focus and function, but also in actual wording. More still, 1835 is also marked by the acceleration of the work on the Kirtland House of the Lord, with its accompanying emphasis on priesthood. Though this revelation comes early in the year, all of these events form a sort of aura around it.
Perhaps still more significant is the immediate textual setting: what follows not only marks a sort of "departure" from previous revelations on the priesthood, it makes a "departure"--as it were--from the characterization of the priesthood offered in the previous twenty verses! But this very fact ensures that what follows is not, strictly speaking, a departure. Rather, something is being added--by the Lord, it must be remembered--to the priesthood ("added" might be the best word to be used here: the governmental structure of the priesthood does not appear to be "eternal"; cf. D&C 84:29-30, D&C 107:5). Government for the Church, in other words, is a duty the Lord decided to assign to the priesthood (which, in and of itself, was not of governmental function). All these details, it should be hoped, establish the absolute importance of what begins with verse 21.
  • D&C 107:21. So radical a shift in the role of the priesthood begins with two vital words: "Of necessity...."
  • D&C 107:22. This verse marks the first instance of the word "quorum" in scripture. Besides its numerous appearances in the following verses, it only shows up elsewhere in D&C 124:62 and 117ff. The institutional importance of a word so seldomly used in scripture suggests that these two revelations are vital for understanding the role and development of the structure of the priesthood in terms of government. (If a broad characterization of section 107 as over and against section 124 is justified: section 107 deals with the introduction and grounding of quorums, while section 124 basically only mentions quorums because the revelation provides names for some specific positions in those quorums. In other words, section 107 is "theoretical," whereas section 124 is "practical." However, it should not be missed how much the "practicality" of section 124 establishes the vitality of more "theoretical" section 107: the institutional importance of the quorums of the priesthood is not a late phenomenon, but something that developed rather quickly--within the lifetime of the prophet Joseph.
It is vital to note that in this passage (as it extends through to verse 37), however, the quorums that are discussed are only the quorums that govern the Church in the broadest sense. The word "quorum," then, appears to have been understood in its more "official" sense. In fact, by 1835, the less official senses of the word were mostly obselete (see the OED entry on "quorum"), and the 1828 Webster's dictionary lists only meanings that bear on official practices (all implying, interestingly, a situation of judgment or justice). The establishment at work in these verses is not, it must be understood, the establishment of the hierarchical quorums of the priesthood. Rather, it is the establishment of a governing system of quorums/councils who have the authority to conduct the business of the entire Church. Verse 32 is perhaps the clearest confirmation of this point: these several quorums (apparently meaning only the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Quorum of the Seventy) "constitute the spiritual authorities of the church." In short, this first instance of "quorums" in scripture is an establishment, not of the quorums of the priesthood, but of the quorums of general authorities in the several and balancing levels of authority. Hence when, later in the revelation, the Lord discusses the "quorums" of the priests, teachers, and deacons, He never uses the term "quorum" at all (see verses 85-90, a series of verses quoted there from an otherwise unpublished revelation of November 1831). (It might be noted further that even in D&C 124, there is never mention of a quorum in the Aaronic Priesthood. Though there is some discussion there of the quorum of the elders, the wording is complex, and this might be only a reference to the quorum of the seventy. The implication seems to be that, at least at first, quorums were only a question of the High Priesthood.)

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a witness of the name of Christ?
  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a special witness of that name?
  • D&C 107:23. Which authorities are special witnesses of Christ?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39

D&C 107:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:33-39
Previous page: Verses 107:21-32                      Next page: Verses 107:40-57


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:33-39 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:33-39 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:39. Here the Lord introduces the office of patriarch, calling those to be ordained to the office, however, "evangelical ministers." Juxtaposed with the lengthy explanation of "this order of the priesthood" that begins with the next verse and continues through verse 57, the title seems odd--and for a number of reasons. The following verses suggest a single line of patriarchs, whereas the commandment in this verse suggests that a number of different patriarchs are to be called in different places. Further, the following verses suggest the most ancient, Old Testament setting for the office, whereas the title "evangelical ministers" has a decisively New Testament flavor (not least because "evangelical" derives from Greek). Finally, though in the following verses it is clear that the patriarchs were part of a more complex covenantal situation (see especially verse 40), the "evangelical ministers" to be called are to be called quite simply "by revelation." In short, the lengthy explanation of the most ancient order of patriarchs seems more to frustrate than to ground this verse (verse 39).
However, that the lengthy explanation turns almost immediately to Adam, in whom "this order was instituted" (verse 41), is quite suggestive: the New Testament flavor of "evangelical ministers" might just imply that in the Second Adam, the order has been made new, has been taken up into the logic of charity, has been opened up so that all might become "literal descendants of the chosen seed" through adoptions as sons (in the Son). In other words, the difference between the office named in verse 39 and the office described at length in verses 40-57 should be felt. The priesthood after the order of the father (the "patriarchal" order), once so perfectly exclusive, has been made "available" through the equally "available" priesthood after the order of the Son (from son to father) that Jesus Christ liberated through atonement. The purpose, then, of the lengthy description of the "original" patriarchal order might be at least twofold: on the one hand, the passage establishes the erstwhile exclusivity of a priesthood order now opened up through the available effects of the atonement; on the other hand, the passage deals at length with the meaning and possibilities of the office that remain, even though the possibility of receiving the order has changed.
The subsequent history of the office of Patriarch may validate this understanding as the lineal descendants of a single family (Joseph Smith, Sr.) served as Presiding Patriarch to the Church until Eldred G. Smith was given emeritus status in 1979. The recent teachings of President Boyd K. Packer indicate that a patriarch acts in a prophetic role (Oct. 2002 General Conference). Although not sustained as such (perhaps non-sustained callings provides food for thought in another vein altogether), stake patriarchs act in a prophetic capacity for their stake,just as the Presiding Patriarch was explicitly sustained as a prophet seer and revelator. The trend toward making the prophetic role available to each stake suggests that the role may extend to the more fundamental units of the church until each household ideally has a patriarch acting in the role of prophet for the family unit. Although speculative, this trajectory validates the textual description of the patriarchal order and the Second Adam opening history back toward the original patriarchal order, thus dividing and uniting history simultaneously.

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:33-35. How do these verses clarify the relations between the three presiding quorums of the Church?
  • D&C 107:33-35. What does it mean to say that the Presidency and the Seventy should build up and regulate all the affairs of the church “first unto the Gentiles and secondly unto the Jews” (verses 33-34)?
  • D&C 107:33-35. What does it mean to us that the gospel is to be proclaimed by the Twelve “first unto the Gentiles and then unto the Jews”?
  • D&C 107:39. Given the understanding of the Twelve in this revelation as a traveling high council, how should the relationship between the Twelve and the "evangelical ministers" or patriarchs be understood?
  • D&C 107:39. How should the word "evangelical" be read here? What precendent might there have been for this language? How might it be connected with the phrase "preacher of righteousness" (cf. Moses 6:23; 2 Pet 2:5)?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:21-32                      Next page: Verses 107:40-57

D&C 107:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:40-57
Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:40-57 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:40-57 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:41-57: The genealogy of Adam and the blessing at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Verses 41-57 lay out a genealogy of Adam that is at once obviously connected to the similar genealogy in Moses 6:8-23; 8:1-11 and at the same time obviously to be read in light of the event of Adam-ondi-Ahman. A bit of reconstruction is presented in the following table:
  Patriarch          Adam's Age at Birth          Adam's Age at Ordination
  Seth                       130                            199
  Enos                       235                            369
  Cainan                     325                            412
  Mahalaleel                 395                            891
  Jared                      460                            660
  Enoch                      622                            647
  Methuselah                 687                            787
  Lamech                     874                            906
  Noah                    deceased                        deceased
While the emphasis in this table is on ordination, it is clear from the text itself that there is a parallel emphasis on blessing. But the story, so far as blessing goes, is hardly so clear: Seth seems to have received his blessing only at Adam-ondi-Ahman, just before Adam's death, while Enoch received his at age sixty-five, which would have thus occurred during Adam's 687th year; moreover, while blessings are mentioned for Mahalaleel and Jared, none are specifically mentioned in relation to any of the other patriarchs (though it may be that the mention of Adam bestowing his last blessing on his posterity at Adam-ondi-Ahman may be meant to include the others).
All of this suggests the necessity of riddling out what is meant here by ordination as opposed to blessing: what is this blessing and why is it given only after ordination? Most likely, verse 42 provides the answer to this question, though this remains to be explored in any significant depth.
  • D&C 107:42. The promise given to Seth by Adam is interesting for a number of reasons. The context, of course, is that of the passing of the patriarchal order from Adam to Seth, and this verse therefore makes it clear that part of the patriarchal priesthood is a promise that some remnant of the patriarch's seed will be present at the last day (cf. Moses 7:52). This is especially interesting because of the role Seth played in replacing Abel (see on this, especially, Moses 6:2, where Adam explains "God hath appointed me another seed, instead of Abel, whom Cain slew"). The focus on Seth's seed should probably, then, be read in light of Abel's apparent lack of seed, which seems to have been understood quite negatively.
The promise of having a chosen seed that will last until the second coming (and will bless all nations through the priesthood) has been given to many other scriptural figures. For example:
Moses 7:52 says Enoch is promised there will be a remnant of his seed among all nations
Abraham 2:9-11 Abraham, after seeking for the “appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed” (Abr 1:4), is promised that in him and in his seed all the families of the earth will be blessed. References to this Abrahamic Covenant are also found in Gen 12:2-4, Gen 17:5-7, and Gen 22:17-18
Gen 26:3-5 renews the covenant with Isaac
Gen 35:9-12 renews the covenant with Jacob
Gen 49:26 specifically says the blessings of father Jacob will be upon Joseph. This is confirmed in Gen 50:34 JST and 2 Nephi 3:16 (“I will preserve thy seed forever.”)
D&C 110:12 renews the promise of a chosen seed to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdry: Elias commits the dispensation of the gospel of Abraham, “saying that in us and our seed all generations after us shall be blessed.”
D&C 84:34 We can become part of the promised seed of Abraham when we receive the Melchizedek Priesthood

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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  • D&C 107:40. To what extent does the language of the phrase, "the order of this priesthood," imply a kind of split between the patriarchal priesthood being described and the two priesthoods with which the revelation begins? What is implied by the word "order"?
  • D&C 107:40. What does it mean to say that this order of the priesthood was confirmed? Does this imply the working of some particular subject who confirmed it? How can it be confirmed to be handed down genealogically?
  • D&C 107:40. How ought the language of rights ("rightly belongs") be interpreted here?
  • D&C 107:40. How is this revelation connected to the Book of Abraham, the first chapter of which Joseph was translating at about the same time as the reception of this revelation?
  • D&C 107:40. Why should there be an emphasis on literal descendants here? What might non-literal descendants mean?
  • D&C 107:40. What should be read into the word "chosen," and is there some specific reference implied in the language of the promises that were made?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100

D&C 107:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107


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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

D&C 107:71-75

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107


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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

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D&C 107:86-90

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

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Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:91-95

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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:96-100

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 110:11-16

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  • D&C 110:1: Eyes of our understanding. Joseph reports that these visions happened after "the eyes of our understanding were opened". This seems to indicate that for Joseph Smith, seeing a vision was something that happened in the mind, rather than with his physical eyes. He used similar language to report The Vision (D&C 76) and other events. While we sometimes imagine that angels appear in our world just like any other person or thing, a close reading of these accounts seems to indicate that there is something else going on--that angels and other visions only occur as the mind is opened so that spiritual things can be perceived with the "eyes of understanding" rather than our physical eyes.
  • D&C 110:11: Ten tribes. According to the Topical Guide, the two tribes of the southern kingdom were Judah and Benjamin. Assuming Levi is being excluded (since Levi didn't get a land inheritance—reference forthcoming), and Ephraim and Manassah are both included, this would leave the ten tribes as: (1) Reuben, (2) Simeon, (3) Zebulun, (4) Issachar, (5) Dan, (6) Gad, (7) Asher, (8) Naphtali, (9) Ephraim, and (10) Manassah (see Gen 49 for a list of the promises Jacob gives each of his 12 sons).
Although my guess is that this is the most common connotation of the 10 lost tribes, this begs the following questions: First, why is Simeon left out in Deut 33? Second, why is Dan left out of Rev 7?
Bruce R. McConkie says in Mormon Doctrine (under "Tribes of Israel") that there's a Jewish tradition that the anti-Christ will come through the tribe of Dan (I think there's a scholarly reference on this).
I added some notes on these latter two issues (mainly from the WBC) on the Deut 33:8 and Rev 7:6 commentary pages.

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  • D&C 110:1. What does Joseph Smith mean by "the eyes of our understanding were opened"? Does that mean that these visions were seen spiritually, rather than physically? What is the difference between seeing things this way, and an act of imagination?
  • D&C 110:1. How does it change our understanding of visions and angelic messengers to read that they are only visible to our minds, rather than our physical eyes? Does it take more faith to believe something perceived this way, rather than through our normal physical senses?
  • D&C 110:11. Moses. Why did Moses have the keys for the gathering of Israel? What does that gathering have to do with his role as the prophet who led the children of Israel from bondage in Egypt, but not into the Promised Land?
  • D&C 110:11. Ten tribes. Who are the ten tribes being referred to here?

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  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 110 is __.
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Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 110.

  • D&C 110 is one of several sections that were added to the Doctrine & Covenants for the 1876 edition, along with D&C 2, D&C 13, and D&C 132. These additions cause the Doctrine & Covenants to begin with Malachi's promise in D&C 2 that Elijah will return and restore the priesthood sealing keys and an account in D&C 13 of John restoring the first set of preparatory keys, and to finish with an account of the fulfillment of Malachi's promise in D&C 110 and with discussions of the exercise of those keys through proxy baptism in D&C 127 and D&C 128 and eternal marriage in D&C 132 (further bookended by the Preface in D&C 1 and the Appendix in D&C 133).

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"It is appropriate that Moses, who first led God’s children to the land of their inheritance, would be the one to commit the keys of the gathering of Israel to the restored Church. Moses had come to Peter, James, and John on the Mount of Transfiguration and there had bestowed upon them the same priesthood keys in their day."

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D&C 112:26-30

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D&C 112:31-34

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D&C 124:91-95

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  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

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  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

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D&C 124:121-125

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This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125

D&C 124:126-130

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 124
Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 121-123
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 125

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:26. This verse is a revelation about how to go about building a temple. Temples should be permanent, timeless edifices. "Knowledge of antiquity" could be seen to have three values: (1) How temples were used; (2) Artistic and architectural symbolism in temples; and (3) The use of timeless styles that avoid current architectural fads.
  • D&C 124:138-140. These verses resolve an ambiguity that develops in the course of the Doctrine and Covenants. Before the reception of D&C 84:111, the elders are always understood as the ruling authority in local "churches" (an understanding the first part of the D&C shared with the Old and New Testaments, as well as with the Book of Mormon). In fact, it is only with D&C 84:29 that the office of an elder is specifically connected with the higher priesthood (references in D&C 20 that suggest this connection were added in 1835). Beginning with D&C 84, there is a sort of shift in the meaning and function of the office of an elder: suddenly the elders are essentially traveling missionaries. This new meaning completely overshadows the old one until the present passage, where these duties are finally clarified.
Here the distinction is drawn between the two types of elder: there are elders to be sent traveling, and there are elders who are meant to preside over the "churches." The former are here clarified as "seventies," the latter as simply "elders." Both, of course, are elders, and the ambiguity becomes clear.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 124:14. What is the stewardship that the Lord requires of Robert B. Thompson?
  • D&C 124:37-39. What do these verses teach us about the purposes of temples?
  • D&C 124:40. What does it mean to build a house to the name of the Lord?
  • D&C 124:40. Why must it be built to his name if he is to reveal his ordinances therein?
  • D&C 124:41. What is the significance of the promise made in this verse?
  • D&C 124:41. Compare this verse with verse 38. What is the same in each? What does that say about temple ordinances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 124 is __.
  • D&C 124 was first published in __.
  • D&C 124 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 124:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 124.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 121-123                         Next section: D&C 125


JS-H 1:66-70

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:71-75

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

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