Site:SS lessons/DC lesson 46

From Feast upon the Word (http://feastupontheword.org). Copyright, Feast upon the Word.
Jump to: navigation, search

This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


1 Kgs 8:1-5

Home > The Old Testament > Kings > 1 Kings 1-11
Previous page: Kings                              Next Page: 1 Kings 12-16a


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Historical setting[edit]

This section should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand these chapters. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

A broader treatment of the history of ancient Israel, including Kings, is found at Old Testament: Historical Overview.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

  • 1 Kgs 9:4: David's integrity. How can this view of David be reconciled with the JST view of David in 1 Kgs 11:4 and 6? For some personal reflections, see Robert C.'s comment here.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




Previous page: Kings                              Next Page: 1 Kings 12-16a

Matt 5:6-10

Home > The New Testament > Matthew > Chapters 5-7 > Verses 5:1-12
Previous page: Chapters 5-7                      Next page: Verses 5:13-48


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Matt 5:1. In Matthew’s Gospel, mountains are places where important things happen. (See Matt 4:8; Matt 17:1; and Matt 28:16.) As he tells the story, Jesus seems deliberately to give the Sermon on the Mount in a way that compares him to Moses: he goes up on a mountain and delivers a “new” law for a multitude who are gathered at the base of the mountain waiting for his return. In Matt 4:23, Matthew tells us "Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom." Matthew 5-7 is the gospel that he preached.
  • Matt 5:3-11: Blessed. The word translated blessed is a poetic word that can also be translated happy. In Greek literature, it was used to describe the happy state in which the gods lived.
  • Matt 5:3. The Greek of this verse is usually translated as the King James translator's have translated it: "for theirs is the kingdom of heaven." However, it could also be translated "for the kingdom of heaven is made up of them."
  • Matt 5:1-3: Joseph Smith Translation. Joseph Smith's inspired emendation of Matthew 5:1 adds an interesting prologue to the Sermon:
KJV JST
[1] And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him: [2] And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, [1] And Jesus, seeing the multitudes, went up into a mountain; and when he was set down, his disciples came unto him; [2] And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying,
[3] Blessed are they who shall believe on me; and again, more blessed are they who shall believe on your words, when ye shall testify that ye have seen me and that I am. [4] Yea, blessed are they who shall believe on your words, and come down into the depth of humility, and be baptized in my name; for they shall be visited with fire, and the Holy Ghost, and shall receive a remission of their sins.
[3] Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. [5] Yea blessed are the poor in spirit, who come unto me; for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Joseph Smith's addition makes it clear that the Sermon on the Mount is an exposition of the gospel. It also changes the way we can understand verse three: it becomes a summary of the gospel. Rather than the first in the list of beatitudes, it is the summary of the gospel, followed by the beatitudes.
  • Matt 5:3. Seeing the Sermon this way creates a chiasm, with mercy at its center:
A. They that mourn shall be comforted (verse 4)
B. The meek shall inherit the earth (verse 5)
C. Those who hunger and thirst for righteousness will be 'filled [with the Holy Ghost] (verse 6; compare 3 Nephi 12:6)
D. The merciful will obtain mercy (verse 7)
C'. The pure in heart will see God (verse 8 )
B". Peacemakers will be the children of God? (verse 9)
A'. Those who are persecuted for righteousness will receive a great reward, the kingdom of heaven (verses 10-12)
  • Matt 5:5. The meek and the poor in spirit seem to me to be the same people. (See footnote 5a in the LDS published version of the Bible.) Later in the Sermon, Jesus will give examples of meekness. (See Matt 5:39-42.) Note, too, that this verse is a quotation of Ps 37:11 (in the Greek version of first-century Judaism).
  • Matt 5:11. We see a division in the Sermon at verse 11: The Beatitudes give us the general description of the gospel and the verses that follow expand on that general description.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Matt 5:3. Poor in spirit cannot mean that one has a spirit that is poor or wanting, so what does it mean? Compare this verse to Isa 61:1. Does that comparison give you any ideas about how to understand this beatitude?
  • Matt 5:3. How does the meaning of this verse change if it is translated "for the kingdom of heaven is made up of them?" (See lexical note.)
  • Matt 5:6. The word translated “righteousness” could also have been translated “justice.” One way to think about what it means to be righteous is to ask, “What would it mean for me to be just?” How does changing the question in that way change our thinking? As the word translated “righteousness” is used in Greek, it most often refers to one who has right relations with God. What did the Pharisees believe was required for righteousness? What does Jesus teach about righteousness?
  • Matt 5:7. Is it significant that the previous beatitudes had focused on something like attitude and that this beatitude begins a focus that is more on action? What does “mercy” mean? What does it take to be merciful? How are the requirement to desire justice (verse 6) and the requirement to be merciful related to each other?
  • Matt 5:7. Why might the Beatitudes center on mercy? (See the chiasm suggested in the exegesis for Matt 5:1-5.) How is the theme of mercy related to the additions that Joseph Smith made to the beginning of the Sermon? How is Jesus' message of mercy a challenge to the Pharisees and scribes? What would that message have meant to Jesus' audience? What does it mean to us today?
  • Matt 5:8. The word translated “pure” could also have been translated “cleansed.” What does it mean to have a heart that has been cleansed? Is Jesus contrasting the cleansing of the heart with the various kinds of cleansing that the Pharisees required? How do the two differ? What does it mean to see God?
  • Matt 5:9. Who do you think that Jesus has in mind when he speaks of the peacemakers? Do verses 23-26 give us an idea of what he means? What does it mean that the peacemakers will be called the children of God? Aren’t we already his children? Why might Jesus have associated being a peacemaker with being a child of God? In what senses is Godthe peacemaker?
  • Matt 5:10-12. Verse 10 speaks of being persecuted “for righteousness’ sake.” Verse 11 speaks of being persecuted “for my sake.” What do you make of the identification of righteousness and Jesus, a person? How does that contrast with the Pharisaic understanding of righteousness as obedience? Is the beginning of verse 12, “Rejoice, and be exceeding glad” parallel to “Blessed are [. . .]” in the previous beatitudes? Does it help us understand what it means to be blessed?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Matt 5:3. Elder Holland discusses how Christ heals us in his conference address Broken Things to Mend. He sees the phrase poor in spirit as addressing the "troubled, the discouraged and downhearted."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




Previous page: Chapters 5-7                      Next page: Verses 5:13-48

Heb 12:21-25

Home > The New Testament > Hebrews > Chapter 12-13
Previous page: Chapter 11                      This is the last page for Hebrews


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Heb 12:20: If so much as a beast touch the mountain. This seems to be a quotation of Ex 19:12-13.
  • Heb 12:22-24. Joseph Smith returned again and again to these three verses during the Nauvoo era, beginning from one of his earliest recorded discourses in 1839 and continuing right until his last days. The priesthood emphasis he placed on them makes it quite clear that these verses form the "theological basis" for many of the ritual developments of Nauvoo: baptism for the dead, the endowment (as performed there and since), sealing ordinances, plural marriage, receiving the fullness of the priesthood, etc. What is curious about this fact is that these classically Christian verses served as a sort of foundation for what are considered the most unique Latter-day Saint doctrines, the most radically "un-Christian" facets of the LDS Church. In other words, these three verses provide a sort of starting point for understanding Joseph Smith's unique manner of interpretation. The more one looks at how Joseph interpreted and used these three verses, the clearer it becomes that there is a radical difference between "traditional" interpretation of this passage and Joseph's reading of it, but careful investigation also reveals that both approaches are textually justified. That is, both Joseph's reading and the more "traditional" reading are clearly within the bounds of the hermeneutical possibilities bound up within this text. In order to see the range of possibilities--as well as the vastly important role these verses play in LDS "theology"--it would be best to set a more "traditional" approach to these verses side by side with the interpretations of the Prophet Joseph.
A further note about this passage is necessary to its interpretation. The whole of the book of Hebrews is a comparison of the higher and the lower, of the Aaronic and the Melchizedek, of the Mosaic and the Christian, and the present passage is no exception: it is caught up within just such a comparison as well. In other words, these three verses cannot be understood apart from verses 18-21, which sets Mount Sinai against Mount Zion. The comparison is important: Sinai is a "mount that might be touched, and that burned with fire," a place where the Israelites were "intreated that the word should not be spoken to them any more," and something so overwhelming and dreadful that even Moses did "exceedingly fear and quake." Over against this is Mount Zion, an exalted gathering of saints and angels. That the present passage is yet another such comparison (and one of the last of them) is vital for its interpretation: this passage--these three verses in particular--rides on all that has already been said about the superiority of the higher priesthood, of the order of Melchizedek, of the Christian powers of rending the veil, of being sealed up to eternal life, of a faith that stretches beyond obedience/law. All of this is absolutely vital, because one comes to a passage here that is already saturated with the very themes Joseph Smith reads into it: the highest and holiest orders and ordinances in the kingdom of God. At the very least, one must recognize the profundity of verses 22-24 even before reading them.
  • Heb 12:22: But. The contrast suggested here by the Greek word alla (but) seems to be referring to verse 18 where "ye are not come" there is contasted here with "ye are come." The main contrast, then, seems to be that whereas mount Sinai "might be touched," mount Zion is something that must be obtained through faith (cf. "not seen" in Heb 11:1).
  • Heb 12:22. Mount Zion (or "mount Sion") had several meanings anciently. It was the designation for the mountain upon which the City of David was built, on the top of which was Solomon's temple. Josephus misidentified a mountain a little to the west as the original site of the City of David (this city has been excavated over the past few decades), and now Mount Zion is the name of the mountain Josephus erroneously referred to. Regardless, it must first be understood that "Mount Zion" referred specifically to the mountain upon which the most ancient city of Jerusalem was built.
However, it is clear here that no "physical" mountain is meant, precisely because "mount Sion" is being opposed to "the mount that might be touched" (verse 18), Mount Sinai. That is, Mount Zion is here something eschatological, something non-earthly. This is confirmed a moment later when the author describes it as "the heavenly Jerusalem." It is clear from this that Jerusalem is precisely what is meant (the city built on Mount Zion in the most literal sense), but that all of these things are to be understood as heavenly, not earthly. In other words, Jerusalem and Mount Zion, etc., are being used here as designators for heavenly counterparts to earthly realities. That is, Jerusalem and Mount Zion are here "spiritualized" or recognized as types of something in heaven. (It might be worth noting that this does not call the passage or the book into question, despite the fact that "spiritual" readings of the scriptures have been often derided among Latter-day Saints: the earthly reality is not at all denied in a "spiritual" reading, but rather its function as sign alters its relation to things and among things on earth.)
Though a whole list of "things" to which "ye are come" is about to laid out, it is clear from the first that there is an order to things here. The first "thing" to which one comes is the mount: long before coming into the company of angels or of God, one comes just to the foot of the mountain to begin to climb. Part of the way up, one passes through the gates of "the city of the living God," coming closer bit by bit to the actual place of God. By the end of this verse, one passes through the outer limits of the gathered throngs of angels, breaking into the heavenly circle. Over the course of the following two verses, one passes through all of these things to stand in the presence of God Himself and Christ with Him. There are some difficulties about the order there, but they must be discussed below.
These several points of passage tie in with traditional Hebrew imagery (or beliefs): upon Mount Zion stands the city of David, the city eventually to be the abode of the Messiah (the King), a place that is heavenly inasmuch as the temple remains central and sacral. If one is able to pass through the veil of the temple (boldy, as implied by the "But" with which this verse starts: not with the fear and quaking of Sinai, but with boldness), one enters into "an innumerable company of angels," what Nephi describes (in discussing Lehi's vision) as "numberless concourses of angels in the attitude of singing and praising their God" (1 Ne 1:8). The imagery of this verse, that is, is one of climbing up the sacred mountain and into the very presence of God by coming into His council. There, in the midst of the angels (perhaps through a rite of apotheosis; cf. Isa 6), one is given the opportunity to face God and to dwell in a heavenly place that is, nonetheless, on earth.
If all of these details combine well to make a clear picture of things, Joseph Smith's commentary on the verse only enriches it further by making this picture a temporal as well as a spiritual one. That is, if Mount Zion is here spiritualized, Joseph Smith re-temporalizes it without denying the purely spiritual (or typological) character of the author's intention. Commenting on this verse, Joseph Smith explained that "Dan VII Speaks of the Ancient of days, he means the oldest man, our Father Adam, Michael; he will call his children together, & hold a council with them to prepare them for the coming of the Son of Man. He, (Adam) is the Father of the human family & presides over the Spirits of all men, & all that have had the Keys must stand before him in this great Council." He further explained, "Those men to whom these Keys have been given will have to be there. (I.E. when Adam shall again assemble his children of the Priesthood, & Christ be in their midst) the Ancient of Days come &c &c [note added by John Taylor]) And they without us cannot not be made perfect. These men are in heaven, but their children are on Earth. Their bowels yearn over us. God sends down men for this reason, Mat. 13. 41. & the Son of man shall send forth his Angels &c-All these authoritative characters will come down & join hand in hand in bringing about this work."
Quite simply put, Joseph Smith's interpretation seems to have understood this "coming to an innumberable company of angels, of God and of Christ" business to be a reference to the eventual assembly at Adam-Ondi-Ahman, where the Ancient of Days will sit in judgment and council, Christ will appear, and Adam will deliver up his stewardship. On this reading, the imagery of the verse becomes, even if spiritual, literal as well. Coming up to the mount, but perhaps not climbing it, one remains in the valley where the innumerable company of angels will gather to seal up every key, etc. What seems to have been more important about all of this to Joseph, however, is not where it will take place, or that there is a literal event to be spoken of, but that all of these things amount to a sealing up of the fathers and the children, of earth and heaven, of the temporal and the spiritual, of angels and men, etc. The significance of Adam-Ondi-Ahman is precisely this: heaven and earth become one when the sealing ordinance binds the two, especially in binding the dead fathers to the living sons, sons alive at the coming of the Savior. Whatever else can be said about the present passage, one must keep Joseph's comments in mind.
  • Heb 12:24: Sprinkle blood. This phrase, similar to that used in Heb 9:13-14, seems to be alluding to passages such as Num 19:9, 13, 20, 21, and Ex 24:8. There may also be a reference to Isa 52:15 ("sprinkle many nations" in the KJV, "startle many nations" in most modern translations), but the LXX term used there is thaumasontai, which seems to mean something more like "startle," instead of rhantizo as used here. Although most quotations in Hebrews seem to be more similar to the Masoretic Text than the LXX, it seems there is some evidence that the author of Hebrews was quoting from a pre-Masoretic Hebrew text (see Howard, p. 208).

Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

"I love the symbolism of women reaching out to touch the Savior. We long to be close to the Lord, for we know that He loves each of us... His touch can heal ailments spiritual, emotional, or physical... Where else would we reach, where else would we come but to Jesus Christ, 'the author and finisher of our faith?'"
  • Heb 12:22. The material quoted in the exegesis for verse 22 can be found in Ehat and Cook, The Words of Joseph Smith, in the talk they label "Before 8 August 1839 (1)." The discourse is also online here.
  • Heb 12:24.Howard, George. "Hebrews and the Old Testament Quotations," Novum Testamentum, Vol. 10, Fasc. 2/3 (Apr. - Jul., 1968), pp. 208-216. Howard writes, "It has been popular in the past to begin a commentary or an introduction to the Epistle by stating that the writer always uses the Septuagint version of the OT (sometimes in the form of Codex Vaticanus, but more often in the form of Codex Alexandrius) and never shows acquaintance with the Hebrew. Since the discovery of the Qumran Literature and the impetus given by it to the study of the pre-Masoretic text, it is now probable that the text used by the author of Hebrews is, on occasion, closer to a Hebrew recension more ancient than the Masoretic text)" (p. 208).

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.




Previous page: Chapter 11                      This is the last page for Hebrews

D&C 45:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 50:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 50
Previous section: D&C 49                         Next section: D&C 51


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 49
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 51
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 50 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 50:2-4. A little over one year after the church was established it was already having problems with false spirits (v. 2). Verse 4 makes it clear that the Lord wasn't happy with some of the saints.
  • D&C 50:6-9. Verse 7 tells us that those whose choices have given the adversary power, but whose actions are the result of having been deceived, will be reclaimed. If we apply this promise widely to those led in whatever wrong direction because they were deceived, it provides some comfort. In contrast the hypocrites will be cut off. The difference between the two groups seems to depend on whether one is a deceiver or a deceived. Of course, applying the scripture to ourselves, the significant point is to avoid falling in either group as indicated in verse 9.
  • D&C 50:1-9. If we read verses 1-9 as connected to the next verses, then it could be read that there were hypocrites who came, deceived, and thereby weakened some Saints (v 7). Because of their weakened state, these Saints were more likely to receive spirits which they could not understand (v 15-16).
  • D&C 50:24: Brighter until the perfect day. A natural reading of this verse suggests a contrast between growing brightness and the perfect day. That is, "he that receiveth light" will continue to grow brighter "until the perfect day" seems to imply that the growing in light stops at some point. This does not necessarily contradict the notion that one will continue to increase in glory via some sense of "eternal increase" (cf. D&C 131:4), but it does suggest there may be some sort of achievable level of attained light where one is then considered perfect or whole or complete.
  • D&C 50:26-27. Verses 26-27 are similar to D&C 46:27 "unto such as God shall appoint and ordain to watch over the church and to be elders unto the church, are to have it given unto them to discern all those gifts lest there shall be any among you professing and yet be not of God."
  • D&C 50:30. Verse 30's language of a "head" is similar to D&C 46:29 "That unto some it may be given to have all those gifts, that there may be a head"

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 50:14. The business of "receiving" in this section has a lot to be worked out. In verse 14, the Lord talks about their ordination to go teach, but verse 15 talks about them receiving, not teaching. Verse 19's usage of "receiving" seems to mean those being taught. So why, in verse 15, does the Lord talk about someone who is called to teach as receiving?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 50 is __.
  • D&C 50 was first published in __.
  • D&C 50 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 50:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 50.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • Robert D. Hales, "To Act for Ourselves: The Gift and Blessings of Agency," Ensign, May 2006, pp. 4–8. "Agency is strengthened by our faith and obedience. Agency leads us to act: to seek that we may find, to ask that we may receive guidance from the Spirit, to knock on that door that leads to spiritual light and ultimately salvation. I bear special witness that our Savior Jesus Christ is the source of that light, even the Light and Life of the World. As we use our agency to follow Him, His light will grow within us 'brighter and brighter until that perfect day' when we are welcomed into the presence of our Father in Heaven for all eternity."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 49                         Next section: D&C 51

D&C 57:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 57
Previous section: D&C 56                         Next section: D&C 58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 56
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 58
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 57 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 57 is __.
  • D&C 57 was first published in __.
  • D&C 57 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 57:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 57.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 56                         Next section: D&C 58

D&C 64:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 64
Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 63
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 66
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 64 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:9: The greater sin. What God does is to help us repent and grow into something more than we are now. (Moses 1:39). He wants us to outgrow and no longer be the same people who used to commit sins. He promises that when we repent and outgrow those prior sins, they will be forgotten and will be remembered no more. (__). Understood from this perspective, failing to forgive is one of the most unGodlike things we can do. Regardless of whether failing to forgive counts as a demerit or a sin, being someone who is unwilling to forgive makes us be unlike our Heavenly Father and not live a Celestial law. Failing to forgive, as hard as it sometimes is, thus stops our own forward progress regardless of what other people may do.
Also see Stephen's personal thoughts on this verse here (Ethesis blog entry, Feb 24, 2006).
  • D&C 64:23-24: Tithing and burning. The connection between tithing and burning in verse 23 hints at Malachi, and then verse 24 confirms this by quoting Mal 4:1. There, the apostate temple priesthood is condemned by the Lord in a dialogue, precisely because they have "robbed" the tithes and offerings (that other Israelites have brought to the temple?) (Mal 3:8-12). Those of the priesthood who repent in response to this condemnation together write up a "book of remembrance," into which their names are inserted (Mal 3:16). This makes all the difference when in 4:1 the coming of the Lord to the temple is announced: those who are not written in the book are burned, as this revelation here announces as well. That Elijah's return is then promised in Mal 4:5-6 might at first seem odd, but the point seems to be that the "book of remembrance" written up is something that remains to be sealed up by the powers of the fullness of the priesthood.
All of this might be read into the Doctrine and Covenants. The connections between these two verses and Malachi are quite obvious. And then these same kinds of connections are obvious in D&C 85, where the relation between tithing and the law of consecration begins to be clarified. In fact, in that revelation, the "book of remembrance" and the sealing together of "fathers" and "children" are also mentioned, drawing these themes together. That the temple is in question in Malachi becomes relevant in D&C 97:10-14, where tithing is specifically gathered for the building of a temple in Zion (where this, D&C 64, is received, and where this law has particular application, according to verse 22 here). Finally, D&C 119 confirms all of these themes by laying out the law of tithing quite broadly (and again in connection with the law of consecration).
These themes, all gathered together, suggest something about the relation between this revelation (section 64) and the revelation of the law of consecration (section 42): apparently the latter was given before the former because of the complete interconnectedness of consecration and tithing, an interconnectedness that makes tithing not a preparation for consecration but a token of its already being kept. That is: tithing is what one does after consecration, according to the collective witness of these several revelations. In this register, it is interesting that D&C 64 once concluded the Book of Commandments. Coming essentially as the culmination of a series of revelations connected with Zion and its establishment in Jackson County, Missouri, this section provided the people returning to the environs of Eden with the law of consecration, in connection with the law of sacrifice or tithing. All of this deserves more thought.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:10. Why does the Lord require us to forgive all men? Why must we forgive even those who the Lord will not forgive (see verse 7)?
  • D&C 64:36. What does it mean to be "of the blood of Ephraim"? Does this somehow relate behavior with heredity or biology?
  • D&C 64:36. How can verse 36 be understood without falling into a facile ethnocentrism?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 64 is __.
  • D&C 64 was first published in __.
  • D&C 64 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 64:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 64.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66

D&C 64:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 64
Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 63
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 66
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 64 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:9: The greater sin. What God does is to help us repent and grow into something more than we are now. (Moses 1:39). He wants us to outgrow and no longer be the same people who used to commit sins. He promises that when we repent and outgrow those prior sins, they will be forgotten and will be remembered no more. (__). Understood from this perspective, failing to forgive is one of the most unGodlike things we can do. Regardless of whether failing to forgive counts as a demerit or a sin, being someone who is unwilling to forgive makes us be unlike our Heavenly Father and not live a Celestial law. Failing to forgive, as hard as it sometimes is, thus stops our own forward progress regardless of what other people may do.
Also see Stephen's personal thoughts on this verse here (Ethesis blog entry, Feb 24, 2006).
  • D&C 64:23-24: Tithing and burning. The connection between tithing and burning in verse 23 hints at Malachi, and then verse 24 confirms this by quoting Mal 4:1. There, the apostate temple priesthood is condemned by the Lord in a dialogue, precisely because they have "robbed" the tithes and offerings (that other Israelites have brought to the temple?) (Mal 3:8-12). Those of the priesthood who repent in response to this condemnation together write up a "book of remembrance," into which their names are inserted (Mal 3:16). This makes all the difference when in 4:1 the coming of the Lord to the temple is announced: those who are not written in the book are burned, as this revelation here announces as well. That Elijah's return is then promised in Mal 4:5-6 might at first seem odd, but the point seems to be that the "book of remembrance" written up is something that remains to be sealed up by the powers of the fullness of the priesthood.
All of this might be read into the Doctrine and Covenants. The connections between these two verses and Malachi are quite obvious. And then these same kinds of connections are obvious in D&C 85, where the relation between tithing and the law of consecration begins to be clarified. In fact, in that revelation, the "book of remembrance" and the sealing together of "fathers" and "children" are also mentioned, drawing these themes together. That the temple is in question in Malachi becomes relevant in D&C 97:10-14, where tithing is specifically gathered for the building of a temple in Zion (where this, D&C 64, is received, and where this law has particular application, according to verse 22 here). Finally, D&C 119 confirms all of these themes by laying out the law of tithing quite broadly (and again in connection with the law of consecration).
These themes, all gathered together, suggest something about the relation between this revelation (section 64) and the revelation of the law of consecration (section 42): apparently the latter was given before the former because of the complete interconnectedness of consecration and tithing, an interconnectedness that makes tithing not a preparation for consecration but a token of its already being kept. That is: tithing is what one does after consecration, according to the collective witness of these several revelations. In this register, it is interesting that D&C 64 once concluded the Book of Commandments. Coming essentially as the culmination of a series of revelations connected with Zion and its establishment in Jackson County, Missouri, this section provided the people returning to the environs of Eden with the law of consecration, in connection with the law of sacrifice or tithing. All of this deserves more thought.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:10. Why does the Lord require us to forgive all men? Why must we forgive even those who the Lord will not forgive (see verse 7)?
  • D&C 64:36. What does it mean to be "of the blood of Ephraim"? Does this somehow relate behavior with heredity or biology?
  • D&C 64:36. How can verse 36 be understood without falling into a facile ethnocentrism?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 64 is __.
  • D&C 64 was first published in __.
  • D&C 64 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 64:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 64.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66

D&C 64:41-43

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 64
Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 63
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 66
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 64 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:9: The greater sin. What God does is to help us repent and grow into something more than we are now. (Moses 1:39). He wants us to outgrow and no longer be the same people who used to commit sins. He promises that when we repent and outgrow those prior sins, they will be forgotten and will be remembered no more. (__). Understood from this perspective, failing to forgive is one of the most unGodlike things we can do. Regardless of whether failing to forgive counts as a demerit or a sin, being someone who is unwilling to forgive makes us be unlike our Heavenly Father and not live a Celestial law. Failing to forgive, as hard as it sometimes is, thus stops our own forward progress regardless of what other people may do.
Also see Stephen's personal thoughts on this verse here (Ethesis blog entry, Feb 24, 2006).
  • D&C 64:23-24: Tithing and burning. The connection between tithing and burning in verse 23 hints at Malachi, and then verse 24 confirms this by quoting Mal 4:1. There, the apostate temple priesthood is condemned by the Lord in a dialogue, precisely because they have "robbed" the tithes and offerings (that other Israelites have brought to the temple?) (Mal 3:8-12). Those of the priesthood who repent in response to this condemnation together write up a "book of remembrance," into which their names are inserted (Mal 3:16). This makes all the difference when in 4:1 the coming of the Lord to the temple is announced: those who are not written in the book are burned, as this revelation here announces as well. That Elijah's return is then promised in Mal 4:5-6 might at first seem odd, but the point seems to be that the "book of remembrance" written up is something that remains to be sealed up by the powers of the fullness of the priesthood.
All of this might be read into the Doctrine and Covenants. The connections between these two verses and Malachi are quite obvious. And then these same kinds of connections are obvious in D&C 85, where the relation between tithing and the law of consecration begins to be clarified. In fact, in that revelation, the "book of remembrance" and the sealing together of "fathers" and "children" are also mentioned, drawing these themes together. That the temple is in question in Malachi becomes relevant in D&C 97:10-14, where tithing is specifically gathered for the building of a temple in Zion (where this, D&C 64, is received, and where this law has particular application, according to verse 22 here). Finally, D&C 119 confirms all of these themes by laying out the law of tithing quite broadly (and again in connection with the law of consecration).
These themes, all gathered together, suggest something about the relation between this revelation (section 64) and the revelation of the law of consecration (section 42): apparently the latter was given before the former because of the complete interconnectedness of consecration and tithing, an interconnectedness that makes tithing not a preparation for consecration but a token of its already being kept. That is: tithing is what one does after consecration, according to the collective witness of these several revelations. In this register, it is interesting that D&C 64 once concluded the Book of Commandments. Coming essentially as the culmination of a series of revelations connected with Zion and its establishment in Jackson County, Missouri, this section provided the people returning to the environs of Eden with the law of consecration, in connection with the law of sacrifice or tithing. All of this deserves more thought.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 64:10. Why does the Lord require us to forgive all men? Why must we forgive even those who the Lord will not forgive (see verse 7)?
  • D&C 64:36. What does it mean to be "of the blood of Ephraim"? Does this somehow relate behavior with heredity or biology?
  • D&C 64:36. How can verse 36 be understood without falling into a facile ethnocentrism?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 64 is __.
  • D&C 64 was first published in __.
  • D&C 64 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 64:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 64.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 63                         Next section: D&C 66

D&C 82:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 82
Previous section: D&C 81                         Next section: D&C 83


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 81
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 83

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 82:10: Bound. In the Doctrine and Covenants, the word "bound" has at least two uses: as a synonym of "sealed," joined by covenant; and as a description of what happens to Satan at the end, as a synonym of "tied up." In this section, binding is mentioned three times, in this verse, in verse 11 and in verse 15. In the second two cases, it clearly means "sealed by covenant." It seems reasonable to assume that's what it means here too, especially given the explicit connection of "bound" and "promise" in this verse.
We sometimes hear people using this verse to discuss "binding God," in other words, putting ourselves in a position where we force him to do what we want, but that seems fairly clearly to be a misunderstanding of the verse. The point is that he binds himself to us by covenant when we obey him, not that when we obey him we have power over him.
  • D&C 82:23: Judgment. As used in the scriptures, the word "judgment" usually means "condemnation."

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 82:1. Why might this section, which was given at the organization of the First Presidency, begin with an admonition to forgive?
  • D&C 82:3. We sometimes misquote this verse, saying, "unto whom much is given, much is expected." Instead of "expected," the Lord says "required." What does it mean to have much required?
  • D&C 82:7. Compare this verse to James 2:10. How would you explain this teaching to your children? To an investigator?
  • D&C 82:10. How does this verse figure into the law of consecration?
  • D&C 82:23. How do we avoid condemning others?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 82 is __.
  • D&C 82 was first published in __.
  • D&C 82 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 82:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 82.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 81                         Next section: D&C 83

D&C 97:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 97
Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 96
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 98

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 97 is __.
  • D&C 97 was first published in __.
  • D&C 97 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 97:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94

D&C 97:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 97
Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 96
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 98

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 97 is __.
  • D&C 97 was first published in __.
  • D&C 97 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 97:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94

D&C 97:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 97
Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 96
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 98

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 97 is __.
  • D&C 97 was first published in __.
  • D&C 97 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 97:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94

D&C 97:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 97
Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 96
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 98

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 97 is __.
  • D&C 97 was first published in __.
  • D&C 97 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 97:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94

D&C 97:26-28

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 97
Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 96
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 98

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 97 is __.
  • D&C 97 was first published in __.
  • D&C 97 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 97:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 96                         Next section: D&C 94

D&C 100:11-17

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 100
Previous section: D&C 98                         Next section: D&C 101


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 98
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 101

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 100 is __.
  • D&C 100 was first published in __.
  • D&C 100 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 100:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 100.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 98                         Next section: D&C 101

D&C 101:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 105:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 105
Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 104
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 106

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106

D&C 105:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 105
Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 104
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 106

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106

D&C 105:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 105
Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 104
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 106

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 104                         Next section: D&C 106

Moses 7:11-15

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Moses > Chapters 6-8 > Verses 7:1-19
Previous page: Verses 6:48-68                              Next Page: Verses 7:20-69


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapters 6-8. The relationship of Verses 7:1-19 to the rest of Chapters 6-8 is discussed at Chapters 6-8.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 7:1-19 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this section. →

  • Moses 7:18: Three standards of Zion condition. This verse appears to establish a three part test for what constitutes a Zion standard of society:
Also see the discussion of four components of Zion.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:18. See Come to Zion by Elder D. Todd Christofferson for a treatise on the Unity, Holiness, and Caring for the Poor that characterize Zion.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 6:48-68                              Next Page: Verses 7:20-69

Moses 7:16-20

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Moses > Chapters 6-8 > Verses 7:1-19
Previous page: Verses 6:48-68                              Next Page: Verses 7:20-69


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapters 6-8. The relationship of Verses 7:1-19 to the rest of Chapters 6-8 is discussed at Chapters 6-8.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 7:1-19 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this section. →

  • Moses 7:18: Three standards of Zion condition. This verse appears to establish a three part test for what constitutes a Zion standard of society:
Also see the discussion of four components of Zion.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:18. See Come to Zion by Elder D. Todd Christofferson for a treatise on the Unity, Holiness, and Caring for the Poor that characterize Zion.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 6:48-68                              Next Page: Verses 7:20-69

Moses 7:61-65

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Moses > Chapters 6-8 > Verses 7:20-69
Previous page: Verses 7:1-19                              Next Page: Verses 8:1-30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapters 6-8. The relationship of Verses 7:20-69 to the rest of Chapters 6-8 is discussed at Chapters 6-8.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 7:20-69 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:51-52. As a response to Enoch's plea in verse 50 (a two-fold plea: for mercy upon the seed of Noah, and for a promise that floods would never again destroy the earth), the Lord here makes both a covenant and an oath with Enoch. The response is, in verse 51, quite simply a matching up of two promises with the two pleas: the Lord "would stay the floods," and "he would call upon the children of Noah." But verse 52 adds something to all of this: the Lord doubles the promise concerning Noah's seed by decreeing that a remnant of it should remain to the Second Coming, or "while the earth should stand." The promise is curious, because it suggests that there is something important covenantally about there being someone in Noah's line still alive at the end of earth's history. This may connect the verse up with D&C 107:42, or again with D&C 84:33 (one should notice, as regards the latter reference, the similarity between the "oath" and "covenant" here and in D&C 84:40).
  • Moses 7:57. Verse 57 may seem like a contradiction. The begining of the verse states that "as many of the spirits as were in prison came forth", but then it claims that "the remainder were reserved in chains." That some spirits would be reserved in chains seems to contradict the statement that all the spirits in prison already "came forth" out of prison.
One resolution to this difficulty is to read this as a description of two different groups of spirits. The first group are the spirits of the saints mentioned in verse 56. These saints arise and stand on the right hand of God. Verse 57 then explains that even those saints who were spirits in prison came forth and stood on the right hand of God. The second part of verse 57 then shifts to describe what happens to the second group of spirits in prison, those who were not saints: they are reserved in chains of darkness until the judgment day.
  • Moses 7:61. This verse, in the end, seems to be describing a single veil that separates the heaven from the earth: "the heavens shall be darkened," perhaps precisely because "a veil of darkness shall cover the earth." This "veil" seems, in the end, to amount to a cutting off of the heavens from the earth, of the earth from the heavens. It might be for this very separation that "the heavens shall shake, and also the earth." The wording here is peculiarly similar to D&C 84:49, where one reads that "the whole world lieth in sin, and groaneth under darkness." The D&C is there presumably speaking of this same era and situation, and the D&C seems to offer a similar solution to the difficulty of the veil of darkness as verse 62 here.
  • Moses 7:62. If a veil of darkness keeps the earth and the heavens separate in verse 61, then the veil appears at first to be double ruptured in this verse: from heaven comes righteousness to rend the veil from one direction, and from the earth comes truth to rend it from the other direction. Looking more closely, however, there does not seem to be a rupture of the veil exactly: righteousness seems to pass through the veil, but not to rupture it, and "truth" is only sent "forth out of the earth," not necessarily passing through the veil at all. In fact, that "righteousness and truth" quickly become paired suggests that truth only comes out of the earth to join up with the righteousness that passes through the veil of darkness. The sum of this seems to be that "righteousness and truth" join up beneath the veil of darkness to spread forth upon the earth, while the veil itself remains intact. Of course this question of a veil of darkness must, in the end, be read in light of verse 26, where another veil of darkness covers the earth at the time of a great gathering of saints and coming of the Lord. The comparison between these two passages is perhaps the key to unraveling the meaning of this passage.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:21. The Lord showed Enoch "all the inhabitants of the earth". What other accounts have we been given of prophets seeing similar visions?
  • Moses 7:21. What is meant by the phrase "in process of time"? Are we to believe that they lived as Zion for a time, then the city was taken in a moment, or that it was a gradual process?
  • Moses 7:37. Does this say that their sins shall be on Satan's head?
  • Moses 7:37. What does it mean that their sins will be on anyoe else's head if they will have to suffer? and if they will be shut up in a prison (v 38)?
  • Moses 7:39. Why is Christ referred to as "That"?
  • Moses 7:41. What does the phrase "all eternity shook" mean? Is this shaking meant literally or metaphorically? What does it mean to talk about all eternity as shaking?
  • Moses 7:51. What does it mean that the "Lord could not withhold?" Why could he not withhold?
  • Moses 7:51. Is it significant that the Lord both "covenanted" and swore "with an oath" to Enoch? Is there some connection between this verse and D&C 84:40?
  • Moses 7:57. How are we to understand this verse? (There seems to be an internal conflict between all the spirits coming forth and a remainder being reserved in chains.)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • For Elder Holland's comments on these verses (and others) as they relate the nature of God see his general conference address The Grandeur of God.
  • Moses 7:53. Richard G. Scott, "The Atonement Can Secure Your Peace and Happiness," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 40–42. Elder Scott uses a rock climbing analogy to illustrate the right and wrong way to peace and happiness. "[Solo climbers] are like many who face the challenges and temptations of life without the security of following the commandments of God, guided by the Holy Spirit. In today's difficult world they will almost surely violate critical laws, with painful, destructive consequences. Do not 'solo' in life. You will almost certainly fall into transgression."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 7:1-19                              Next Page: Verses 8:1-30

Moses 7:66-69

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Moses > Chapters 6-8 > Verses 7:20-69
Previous page: Verses 7:1-19                              Next Page: Verses 8:1-30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapters 6-8. The relationship of Verses 7:20-69 to the rest of Chapters 6-8 is discussed at Chapters 6-8.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 7:20-69 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:51-52. As a response to Enoch's plea in verse 50 (a two-fold plea: for mercy upon the seed of Noah, and for a promise that floods would never again destroy the earth), the Lord here makes both a covenant and an oath with Enoch. The response is, in verse 51, quite simply a matching up of two promises with the two pleas: the Lord "would stay the floods," and "he would call upon the children of Noah." But verse 52 adds something to all of this: the Lord doubles the promise concerning Noah's seed by decreeing that a remnant of it should remain to the Second Coming, or "while the earth should stand." The promise is curious, because it suggests that there is something important covenantally about there being someone in Noah's line still alive at the end of earth's history. This may connect the verse up with D&C 107:42, or again with D&C 84:33 (one should notice, as regards the latter reference, the similarity between the "oath" and "covenant" here and in D&C 84:40).
  • Moses 7:57. Verse 57 may seem like a contradiction. The begining of the verse states that "as many of the spirits as were in prison came forth", but then it claims that "the remainder were reserved in chains." That some spirits would be reserved in chains seems to contradict the statement that all the spirits in prison already "came forth" out of prison.
One resolution to this difficulty is to read this as a description of two different groups of spirits. The first group are the spirits of the saints mentioned in verse 56. These saints arise and stand on the right hand of God. Verse 57 then explains that even those saints who were spirits in prison came forth and stood on the right hand of God. The second part of verse 57 then shifts to describe what happens to the second group of spirits in prison, those who were not saints: they are reserved in chains of darkness until the judgment day.
  • Moses 7:61. This verse, in the end, seems to be describing a single veil that separates the heaven from the earth: "the heavens shall be darkened," perhaps precisely because "a veil of darkness shall cover the earth." This "veil" seems, in the end, to amount to a cutting off of the heavens from the earth, of the earth from the heavens. It might be for this very separation that "the heavens shall shake, and also the earth." The wording here is peculiarly similar to D&C 84:49, where one reads that "the whole world lieth in sin, and groaneth under darkness." The D&C is there presumably speaking of this same era and situation, and the D&C seems to offer a similar solution to the difficulty of the veil of darkness as verse 62 here.
  • Moses 7:62. If a veil of darkness keeps the earth and the heavens separate in verse 61, then the veil appears at first to be double ruptured in this verse: from heaven comes righteousness to rend the veil from one direction, and from the earth comes truth to rend it from the other direction. Looking more closely, however, there does not seem to be a rupture of the veil exactly: righteousness seems to pass through the veil, but not to rupture it, and "truth" is only sent "forth out of the earth," not necessarily passing through the veil at all. In fact, that "righteousness and truth" quickly become paired suggests that truth only comes out of the earth to join up with the righteousness that passes through the veil of darkness. The sum of this seems to be that "righteousness and truth" join up beneath the veil of darkness to spread forth upon the earth, while the veil itself remains intact. Of course this question of a veil of darkness must, in the end, be read in light of verse 26, where another veil of darkness covers the earth at the time of a great gathering of saints and coming of the Lord. The comparison between these two passages is perhaps the key to unraveling the meaning of this passage.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 7:21. The Lord showed Enoch "all the inhabitants of the earth". What other accounts have we been given of prophets seeing similar visions?
  • Moses 7:21. What is meant by the phrase "in process of time"? Are we to believe that they lived as Zion for a time, then the city was taken in a moment, or that it was a gradual process?
  • Moses 7:37. Does this say that their sins shall be on Satan's head?
  • Moses 7:37. What does it mean that their sins will be on anyoe else's head if they will have to suffer? and if they will be shut up in a prison (v 38)?
  • Moses 7:39. Why is Christ referred to as "That"?
  • Moses 7:41. What does the phrase "all eternity shook" mean? Is this shaking meant literally or metaphorically? What does it mean to talk about all eternity as shaking?
  • Moses 7:51. What does it mean that the "Lord could not withhold?" Why could he not withhold?
  • Moses 7:51. Is it significant that the Lord both "covenanted" and swore "with an oath" to Enoch? Is there some connection between this verse and D&C 84:40?
  • Moses 7:57. How are we to understand this verse? (There seems to be an internal conflict between all the spirits coming forth and a remainder being reserved in chains.)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • For Elder Holland's comments on these verses (and others) as they relate the nature of God see his general conference address The Grandeur of God.
  • Moses 7:53. Richard G. Scott, "The Atonement Can Secure Your Peace and Happiness," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 40–42. Elder Scott uses a rock climbing analogy to illustrate the right and wrong way to peace and happiness. "[Solo climbers] are like many who face the challenges and temptations of life without the security of following the commandments of God, guided by the Holy Spirit. In today's difficult world they will almost surely violate critical laws, with painful, destructive consequences. Do not 'solo' in life. You will almost certainly fall into transgression."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 7:1-19                              Next Page: Verses 8:1-30

A of F 1:6-10

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > The Articles of Faith

Subpages: AF 1AF 2AF 3AF 4AF 5AF 6AF 7AF 8AF 9AF 10AF 11AF 12AF 13

                                                                 Next page: AF 1


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This section should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This section contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Next page: AF 1

For efficiency this page is pulled from a cached copy. The cache should update about once a day. If you'd like to see the most up to date version, refresh the cache by clicking here.