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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


Eph 4:26-32

Home > The New Testament > Ephesians


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 1:17: Revelation. The Greek word translated as "revelation," apokalupsis, carries with it the idea of uncovering something, exposing something, or making something known that was previously unknown. In the New Testament, it almost always refers to divine revelation.
  • Eph 2:8. In the Joseph Smith Translation, a single word is added in verse 8, apparently to emphasize the contrast: but it is the gift of God.
  • Eph 2:8: Grace. The Greek word here for "grace" (charis, which is etymologically related to the English word "charity") may not have had the theological overtones at the time Paul wrote this as it does today. Charis comes from the verb chairo, which means "to be happy" or "to rejoice," so in its original sense charis means "that which causes joy or pleasure." In a broader sense, it can be understood to mean "lovingkindness," "loving favor," "good will" and things along that line — the kind of love that flows out of a person and whose expression makes that person happy. In other words, to oversimplify a bit, Paul's use of this word indicates that it is God's freely given love for us that saves us.
  • Eph 2:10. Paul in verse 10 puts what precedes into context. The purpose of the atonement and the salvation it brings is that we may do the good works that God assigned to us even before we were born. Some commentators over the years have contrasted this section of Ephesians with James 2:17, but in fact they complement each other. If the whole purpose of our creation is to do good, of what value is the salvation we receive through faith if it doesn't result in doing good?
  • Eph 4:26-27. It is interesting to note that Paul does not condemn anger per se. What is key, he suggests, is not allowing the anger to lead us to sin, for to do so would make room (verse 27) for the devil to be active in our lives. The temptation is to let our anger lead us to do evil. The alternative, Paul says in the following verses, is to actively do good. Instead of stealing, we should give to the needy (verse 28); we should speak in a way that builds people up instead of tearing them down (verse 29); and instead of being malicious to others (verse 31), we should be kind and forgiving in the way that God is kind and forgiving toward us (verse 32).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 5:22. In what way(s) do wives need to submit themselves unto their husbands? What cultural influences prevailed at the time these scriptures were written? Are the statements Paul makes regarding the role of women license to silence them, either literally or figuratively?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Translations[edit]

These are still pointed at Matthew

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in Ephesians. This list is complete:[1]

  • Eph 2:8, 11
  • Eph 3:1-3, 18
  • Eph 4:4, 10, 13, 21-23, 28
  • Eph 5:17

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

  • Eph 4:14. L. Tom Perry, "The Plan of Salvation," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 69–72. Elder Perry encourages members to seek grounding in the gospel. "Let us be no more tossed to and fro by every worldly wind and doctrine of man. We declare to the world that the heavens are open and the truth of God’s eternal plan has again been made known to mankind. We live in the dispensation of the fulness of times... We are not left alone to wander through mortality without knowing of the master plan which the Lord has designed for His children. He has bound Himself by solemn covenant to give us the blessings of heaven according to our obedience... Oh, remember, remember that these things are true, for the Lord God has revealed these eternal truths unto us."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 280-81.


                                                                 Return to The New Testament

Eph 6:11-15

Home > The New Testament > Ephesians


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 1:17: Revelation. The Greek word translated as "revelation," apokalupsis, carries with it the idea of uncovering something, exposing something, or making something known that was previously unknown. In the New Testament, it almost always refers to divine revelation.
  • Eph 2:8. In the Joseph Smith Translation, a single word is added in verse 8, apparently to emphasize the contrast: but it is the gift of God.
  • Eph 2:8: Grace. The Greek word here for "grace" (charis, which is etymologically related to the English word "charity") may not have had the theological overtones at the time Paul wrote this as it does today. Charis comes from the verb chairo, which means "to be happy" or "to rejoice," so in its original sense charis means "that which causes joy or pleasure." In a broader sense, it can be understood to mean "lovingkindness," "loving favor," "good will" and things along that line — the kind of love that flows out of a person and whose expression makes that person happy. In other words, to oversimplify a bit, Paul's use of this word indicates that it is God's freely given love for us that saves us.
  • Eph 2:10. Paul in verse 10 puts what precedes into context. The purpose of the atonement and the salvation it brings is that we may do the good works that God assigned to us even before we were born. Some commentators over the years have contrasted this section of Ephesians with James 2:17, but in fact they complement each other. If the whole purpose of our creation is to do good, of what value is the salvation we receive through faith if it doesn't result in doing good?
  • Eph 4:26-27. It is interesting to note that Paul does not condemn anger per se. What is key, he suggests, is not allowing the anger to lead us to sin, for to do so would make room (verse 27) for the devil to be active in our lives. The temptation is to let our anger lead us to do evil. The alternative, Paul says in the following verses, is to actively do good. Instead of stealing, we should give to the needy (verse 28); we should speak in a way that builds people up instead of tearing them down (verse 29); and instead of being malicious to others (verse 31), we should be kind and forgiving in the way that God is kind and forgiving toward us (verse 32).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 5:22. In what way(s) do wives need to submit themselves unto their husbands? What cultural influences prevailed at the time these scriptures were written? Are the statements Paul makes regarding the role of women license to silence them, either literally or figuratively?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Translations[edit]

These are still pointed at Matthew

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in Ephesians. This list is complete:[1]

  • Eph 2:8, 11
  • Eph 3:1-3, 18
  • Eph 4:4, 10, 13, 21-23, 28
  • Eph 5:17

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

  • Eph 4:14. L. Tom Perry, "The Plan of Salvation," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 69–72. Elder Perry encourages members to seek grounding in the gospel. "Let us be no more tossed to and fro by every worldly wind and doctrine of man. We declare to the world that the heavens are open and the truth of God’s eternal plan has again been made known to mankind. We live in the dispensation of the fulness of times... We are not left alone to wander through mortality without knowing of the master plan which the Lord has designed for His children. He has bound Himself by solemn covenant to give us the blessings of heaven according to our obedience... Oh, remember, remember that these things are true, for the Lord God has revealed these eternal truths unto us."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 280-81.


                                                                 Return to The New Testament

Eph 6:16-20

Home > The New Testament > Ephesians


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 1:17: Revelation. The Greek word translated as "revelation," apokalupsis, carries with it the idea of uncovering something, exposing something, or making something known that was previously unknown. In the New Testament, it almost always refers to divine revelation.
  • Eph 2:8. In the Joseph Smith Translation, a single word is added in verse 8, apparently to emphasize the contrast: but it is the gift of God.
  • Eph 2:8: Grace. The Greek word here for "grace" (charis, which is etymologically related to the English word "charity") may not have had the theological overtones at the time Paul wrote this as it does today. Charis comes from the verb chairo, which means "to be happy" or "to rejoice," so in its original sense charis means "that which causes joy or pleasure." In a broader sense, it can be understood to mean "lovingkindness," "loving favor," "good will" and things along that line — the kind of love that flows out of a person and whose expression makes that person happy. In other words, to oversimplify a bit, Paul's use of this word indicates that it is God's freely given love for us that saves us.
  • Eph 2:10. Paul in verse 10 puts what precedes into context. The purpose of the atonement and the salvation it brings is that we may do the good works that God assigned to us even before we were born. Some commentators over the years have contrasted this section of Ephesians with James 2:17, but in fact they complement each other. If the whole purpose of our creation is to do good, of what value is the salvation we receive through faith if it doesn't result in doing good?
  • Eph 4:26-27. It is interesting to note that Paul does not condemn anger per se. What is key, he suggests, is not allowing the anger to lead us to sin, for to do so would make room (verse 27) for the devil to be active in our lives. The temptation is to let our anger lead us to do evil. The alternative, Paul says in the following verses, is to actively do good. Instead of stealing, we should give to the needy (verse 28); we should speak in a way that builds people up instead of tearing them down (verse 29); and instead of being malicious to others (verse 31), we should be kind and forgiving in the way that God is kind and forgiving toward us (verse 32).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 5:22. In what way(s) do wives need to submit themselves unto their husbands? What cultural influences prevailed at the time these scriptures were written? Are the statements Paul makes regarding the role of women license to silence them, either literally or figuratively?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Translations[edit]

These are still pointed at Matthew

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in Ephesians. This list is complete:[1]

  • Eph 2:8, 11
  • Eph 3:1-3, 18
  • Eph 4:4, 10, 13, 21-23, 28
  • Eph 5:17

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

  • Eph 4:14. L. Tom Perry, "The Plan of Salvation," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 69–72. Elder Perry encourages members to seek grounding in the gospel. "Let us be no more tossed to and fro by every worldly wind and doctrine of man. We declare to the world that the heavens are open and the truth of God’s eternal plan has again been made known to mankind. We live in the dispensation of the fulness of times... We are not left alone to wander through mortality without knowing of the master plan which the Lord has designed for His children. He has bound Himself by solemn covenant to give us the blessings of heaven according to our obedience... Oh, remember, remember that these things are true, for the Lord God has revealed these eternal truths unto us."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 280-81.


                                                                 Return to The New Testament

2 Ne 1:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Second Nephi > Chapters 1-5 > Chapter 1
Previous page: Chapters 1-5                      Next page: Chapter 2


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapters 1-5. The relationship of Chapter 1 to the rest of Chapters 1-5 is discussed at Chapters 1-5.

Story. Chapter 1 consists of ____ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapter 1 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • 2 Ne 1:7. Verse 1:7 promises those that the Lord brings to the land of the Nephites and Lamanites that they will not be brought into captivity so long as they are righteous. If they are not righteous, the land will be cursed to them.
  • 2 Ne 1:10. In verse 10 the "so great blessings" Lehi describes sound much like the blessings given to modern LDS worshippers in the temple endowment. See related links for more information on the temple endowment.
  • 2 Ne 1:21. A bit of irony in that Lehi says he does not want to be brought down with sorrow to the grave, or back to the dust of the earth, and at the same time tells his sons to arise from the dust. And in verse 23, again he tells them to arise from the dust. On one hand he is about to go to the grave and on the other, he tells his sons to arise from the grave.
  • 2 Ne 1:23:Obscurity. Obscurity is a synonym for "darkness." The state of sin is often compared to darkness (see Alma 5:7).
  • 2 Ne 1:26: Sharpness. Sharpness has nine separate meanings in Webester's 1828 Dictionary, including "Painfulness; afflictiveness; as the sharpness or calamity"; "Severity of language; pungency; satirical sarcasm; as the sharpness of a satire or rebuke" ; "Acuteness of intellect"; and, "Quickness of sense or perception."

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • 2 Ne 1:1: Why might Nephi have taught before his father Lehi? What is the relationship between what Lehi teaches and Nephi's teachings?
  • 2 Ne 1:1: Why would it be important for Lehi to remind his sons "how great things the Lord had done for them"?
  • 2 Ne 1:1: Are Nephi's and Lehi's words to Laman and Lemuel all on the same occasion? If so, why does Nephi begin speaking at what turns out to be the occasion of Lehi's last counsel and giving of patriarchal blessings to his whole family? Why isn't Nephi's blessing recorded, or any words of Lehi to Nephi directly, for that matter? Why does Nephi break his record into two books at this exact point, between his words and the words of his father? What is the difference between Nephi's teachings and Lehi's rehearsings, and how do the two relate?
  • 2 Ne 1:2: How can Laman and Lemuel's actions "upon the waters" be construed as "rebellions"? What is meant by rebellions?
  • 2 Ne 1:3: What or where is the "land of promise"? Does this include all of the Americas, or only a part of the Western Hemisphere?
  • 2 Ne 1:4: How much faith would it take for Lehi to believe that the destruction he saw in his vision represented a historic reality? Do we know if Laman and Lemuel accepted this vision?
  • 2 Ne 1:5: Why would it be important to know exactly where this land of promise is located? Does this promise extend to all of the Americas or only a portion?
  • 2 Ne 1:5: Who are "all those" who are also "led out of other countries"?
  • 2 Ne 1:5: What does it mean to be "led...by the hand of the Lord"?
  • 2 Ne 1:6: In verse 6, does it mean that every person who immigrated to the Americas were led by the hand of the Lord? Or does it mean groups of people such as the Puritans. Perhaps verses 6 & 7 refer to things both "temporal" and "spiritual", and a "spiritual" application could apply to "those who are led into the promised or consecrated land" are led by the Lord [that is the only way to get there!] and it will be a "land of liberty"--free from the bondage of sin and temptation.
  • 2 Ne 1:9: What is the "promise" that Lehi obtains in vs. 9? What are the conditions of the promise? Is this a one-way promise from the Lord, or do these verses imply a two-way covenant between the Lord and the posterity of Lehi?
  • 2 Ne 1:10: In verse 10 Lehi tells us that if after having received so great blessings from the Lord, his descendants still reject the Messiah, they will be judged accordingly. From the context it is clear that the Lord expects those who have received these blessings to know better than to reject the Messiah. One of these blessing is "having a knowledge of the creation of the earth." Why is knowledge of the earth particularly important? How does knowing about the creation help us to understand and accept Jesus as our Messiah?
  • 2 Ne 1:10: Where in modern LDS worship do we receive "a knowledge of the creation of the world" and recieve "all the commandments from the beginning"?
  • 2 Ne 1:26: In this verse, how is anger acceptably qualified as truth?
  • 2 Ne 1:26: Which meaning of "sharpness" (see "Lexical notes" below) is most appropriate for verse 26?
  • 2 Ne 1:28-29: Why does Lehi address three distinct groups in v. 28? Why are Lemuel and Sam paired together, why Laman by himself? Who are the sons of Ishmael and Lehi? Their grandchildren? Why is Lehi's first blessing contingent upon being obedient to Nephi?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See James E Talmage's description of the temple endowment here.
  • 2 Ne 1:15: Bonnie D. Parkin, "Eternally Encircled in His Love," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 108–10. Sister Parkin asks: "Do we frequently reject the Lord's love that He pours out upon us in much more abundance than we are willing to receive? Do we think we have to be perfect in order to deserve His love...? This is a gospel of eternal progress, and we must remember to appreciate the journey. Eternal means 'without beginning or end,' so the encircling of His love is there for us every day."
  • 2 Ne 1:21: D. Todd Christofferson, "Let Us Be Men," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 46–48. Elder Christofferson compares the attitudes of Laman and Lemuel to the attitudes of men in our day. He said: "Some act as if a man's highest goal should be his own pleasure. Permissive social mores have 'let men off the hook' as it were... For some, a life of work and achievement is optional."
  • 2 Ne 1:23: Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. Speaking to the priesthood brethren, President Hinckley said: "There is not a man or boy in this vast congregation tonight who cannot improve his life. And that needs to happen... With this priesthood comes a great obligation to be worthy of it."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 1-5                      Next page: Chapter 2

D&C 27:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 27
Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 28

For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

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  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

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D&C 27:16-18

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  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

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  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 42:21-25

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Relationship to Section 42. The relationship of Verses 42:18-29 to the rest of Section 42 is discussed at D&C 42.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 42:18-29 include:

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  • D&C 42:18. Why start the list of "10 Commandments" half way through the list? Why start with not killing, but leave out the commandments before it? (Including the Sabbath Day, which will be mentioned in section 68 as a commandment for those in Zion.)

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D&C 51:6-10

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For a brief overview of D&C 51 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

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  • D&C 51:9. What does "be alike" mean here? What might it mean to us today?
  • D&C 51:9. What does honesty have to do with being alike?
  • D&C 51:9. What do honesty and being alike have to do with being one?
  • D&C 51:10. At the individual level the Lord asks the saints to give and receive through the church so that all may "be alike". So why now at the congregation level does the Lord tell the saints to replace giving and receiving with lending and borrowing?
  • D&C 51:13. Are we still under the obligation to consecrate that which is more than needful?
  • D&C 51:13. How much is more than is needful? Who decides?
  • D&C 51:15. Why is it a privilege to be organized according to the laws of consecration?
  • D&C 51:19. In the context of this section, what does it mean to be "a faithful, a just, and a wise steward"? (Compare D&C 78:22.)

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D&C 52:16-20

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For a brief overview of D&C 52 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

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  • D&C 52:2. Why is it important that the people of the Church are "a remnant of Jacob"?
  • D&C 52:2. To what covenant are they heirs?
  • D&C 52:11-16. Is the pattern that the Lord sets forth in verse 14 useful for Latter-day Saints today? In other words, is this section principally of historical interest, or is there something here that we can liken unto us?
What is the pattern? Is this a fair summary: If someone has a contrite spirit and obeys God's ordinances (Does this mean they are baptized, married in the temple, etc.?), then he is of God. He that has God's power brings forth fruits; he that does not bring forth fruits, is not of God? (verses 17 and 18). It is fairly easy to judge whether someone obeys God's ordinances, but much harder to judge whether that person has a contrite spirit. How would we do this?
Further, when would it be appropriate to employ this "pattern?" Verse 14 suggests that we need to judge according to the pattern so that we are not deceived, because Satan is abroad in the land. But counterbalanced against this counsel is the fact that we are not supposed to judge unrighteous judgment. Also, we have been taught not to be critical and find fault with our leaders. So, it seems that we would not employ this pattern to decide when our leaders are leading us astray. Consider: "Well, I just don't think Bishop So and So has a contrite spirit" seems obviously wrong. As does: "Well, hometeaching hasn't improved at all in the Elder's Quorum. Brother Smith isn't bringing forth fruit as Elder's Quorum president, he must not be of God.
Verses fifteen and sixteen suggest that the pattern allows us to judge those we hear praying or speaking. But when do we need to discern whether someone is deceiving us in the way that they are praying? Perhaps these verses relate more specifically to events and struggles the Saints had during Joseph Smith's era. The need to discern whether a speaker seeks to deceive us (see verse 16) is more clear. Can we flip the pattern around and conclude that he whose language is not meek or doesn't edify is not of God?
  • D&C 52:43. The Lord said "I ... will hasten the city in its time." What does that mean?
  • D&C 52:43. Given the promise that the Lord will "hasten the city," and similar promises, what do you make of the fact that the city of Zion was not established in Missouri?
  • D&C 52:43. What does it mean to be crowned with joy and with rejoicing?
  • D&C 52:43. What does that crowning have to do with the gathering of Israel and the establishment of the City of Zion?

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D&C 59:6-10

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For a brief overview of D&C 59 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

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  • D&C 59:5. The list of commandments beginning in this verse number seven (in terms of "thou shalt's"). These seven commandments appear at first to stand against the ten commandments of the Old Testament (although, upon close study of Ex 20:1ff, one finds that the commandments there might also be read as numbering seven). The seven-fold character of the commandments here culminates in the "thou shalt" of the sabbath day, the seventh commandment thereby presenting the seven-fold existence of the saints.
The ordering of commandments here also suggests a possibly interesting parallel between the first six days of creation. The first three days of creation seem to be follow an interesting parallel pattern by the next three days of creation (4th through 6th days). On the first and fourth day of creation, light and dark are the primary elements at work. On the first and fourth commandment listed here seem primarily related to love (love God with all thy heart vs. not committing adultery). Throughout the scriptures, God is described as both light and love, and the at-one-ment symbolized by the unity of husband and wife is a rich symbol for the central atoning message of the gospel with the purpose of saving mankind from eternal darkness.
On the second and fourth days of creation, air and water are the primary elements at work—heaven is created from the waters on the second day and the fowls and fishes are created on the fourth day. Similarly, the second and fourth commandment listed here are loving versus killing one's neighbor. This taking of life might be viewed as the meeting of body and spirit as air and water become the meeting place between God's light above and man's mortality on earth below.
On the third and sixth days of creation, the earth, grass and herbs and land-dwelling animals (including man and woman) are created. Likewise, the third and sixth commandments have to do with not stealing and showing gratitude for earthly possessions.
  • D&C 59:9. The seventh commandment here (of seven) is the "thou shalt" of the sabbath day. The point is interesting because of the clear tie between the position of seventh commandment and the significance of seven in the sabbath commandment. If Ex 20:1ff is read as a series of seven commandments rather than ten (as it might justifiably be--see commentary there), then the same connection seems to exist elsewhere. In short, the commandments themselves seem to be tied explicitly to seven days of the week, and the holiness of the sabbath seems to have something to do with the seven-fold holiness of the people maintained through obedience.
  • D&C 59:12-13. Keeping in mind D&C 59:10, where the Lord has instructed us that the Sabbath day is a day to rest from our "labors," these verses provide a useful distinction that gives a very useful legal definition of "labors." The Lord defines certain things that are to be done and then said that these are the only things to be done. Since "labors" constitute the things not to be done, this specification of the thing to be done effectively defines "labors" by defining what they are not. Perhaps some more definition is wanting, but to get an idea of what the Lord means by "labors" is an extremely useful tool for those who truly wish to keep the Sabbath day holy.
  • D&C 59:21: hand. This word points to the work of God, His activity in the world, His interruption of things by His ability to create, produce, etc. If this verse points at all to gratitude, it would seem that gratitude is a recognition of this interposition of the hand of God.
  • D&C 59:21. It is certainly significant that the question of confessing God's hand in all things comes before man's obedience. The verse seems to put an emphasis on confessing before acting, before doing. If this emphasis is justifiably read into this verse, then it might be said that foundational to obedience is the work of confession--not of sins but of God's omnipotence. If obedience is an issue of agency--of one's ability to fulfill, or not to fulfill, a commission from God--then agency itself seems to be grounded on a confession that God's hand is "in all things," that before man's "agency" is God's acting, moving, doing, accomplishing, creating, etc.
This verse, as the foregoing suggests, might thus be read as a powerful clarification of the "doctrine" of agency. This doctrine cannot be understood as a universal ability, an absolute freedom, a correlate of man's "co-eternality" with God. Agency is dependent primarily on man's subservient relation to God.
  • D&C 59:23. The Lord promises us that if we're faithful we'll receive "his reward, even peace in this world, and eternal life in the world to come." The phrase "his reward" indicates that the two items following (peace in this world and eternal life in the world to come) are two parts of the same reward. One possibility is that peace in this world comes after we receive an assurance that we will receive eternal life in the next. (On this point, see the related link about President Romney below.)

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 59:13-14. Why did the Lord not say simply joy or rejoicing instead of saying fasting and then indicate that joy or rejoicing is what He means in this context by fasting?
  • D&C 59:21. What does it mean to confess the Lord's hand in all things? Specifically what does it mean to confess the Lord's had in people's evil actions?
  • D&C 59:21. How do the last couple of verses about not using the earth to excess or by extortion affect how we read this verse?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 59 is __.
  • D&C 59 was first published in __.
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  • Changes to the text of D&C 59:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 59.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 59:21. See Jacob J.'s musings on this verse at the New Cool Thang blog here.
  • D&C 59:23. President Marion G. Romney spoke about verse 23 in the 1949 October conference. He explains the different between the peace the world offers, and the peace the Savior offers. And he explains what it means to have your calling and election made sure. more

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 63:16-20

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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For a brief overview of D&C 63 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:34: Hardly. The first definition in Webster's 1828 dictionary means "barely" or "almost not." If this definition is taken, then this verse seems to be saying that the saints will escape the slaying described in verse 33, but just barely.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:37. What might it mean to lift a warning voice "by word and by flight"? How can we do this today if we aren't being called to gather to Utah? Are our neighbors being warned by watching our activities?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 63 is __.
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Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 63.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 62                         Next section: D&C 64

D&C 63:56-60

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

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For a brief overview of D&C 63 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:34: Hardly. The first definition in Webster's 1828 dictionary means "barely" or "almost not." If this definition is taken, then this verse seems to be saying that the saints will escape the slaying described in verse 33, but just barely.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:37. What might it mean to lift a warning voice "by word and by flight"? How can we do this today if we aren't being called to gather to Utah? Are our neighbors being warned by watching our activities?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 63 is __.
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  • Changes to the text of D&C 63:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 63.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 63:61-66

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 62
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  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 63 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:34: Hardly. The first definition in Webster's 1828 dictionary means "barely" or "almost not." If this definition is taken, then this verse seems to be saying that the saints will escape the slaying described in verse 33, but just barely.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 63:37. What might it mean to lift a warning voice "by word and by flight"? How can we do this today if we aren't being called to gather to Utah? Are our neighbors being warned by watching our activities?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 63 is __.
  • D&C 63 was first published in __.
  • D&C 63 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 63:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 63.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 76:21-25

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:1-24 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:1-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:7: The good pleasure of my will. In this preface to the revelation (verses 1-10) we are told in general terms of the blessings which are given to those who fear and serve God. We will then see in verses 11 and on, how this blessing was made manifest to Joseph and Sidney. What is made manifest to them is given here: the pleasure of God's will concerning the things pertaining to his kingdom or, as verse 10 puts it, the secrets of God's will. This language is closely related to Eph 1:5, 9. The point here, as there, seems to be that how and why God deals with us as he does, is not obvious to our own understanding. A similar point is made in Matt 20:1-16 and Matt 25:37-39, 44: God's will concerning our reward will often be different than the expectations of those he rewards.
  • D&C 76:12. Joseph and Sidney tell us that their "eyes were opened" and their "understandings were enlightened." This reminds us of verse 10 which tells us to those who fear God and those who serve him (see verse 5) God will make known unto them the secrets of his will--"even those things which eye has not seen, nor ear hear, nor yet entered into the heart of man." The paradox of seeing something man cannot see requires first that their "eyes were opened."

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:4. What does the phrase "from eternity to eternity" mean? Does it imply that there are multiple eternities? What might this even mean?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean to say that the Lord is "the same" from eternity to eternity? If the Lord was a pre-mortal spirit, then came and obtained a body, then was resurrected to full glory to inherit all that the Father has, hasn't he changed?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean that the Lord's "years never fail"?
  • D&C 76:5. If the LORD is a God of love, why do we need to "fear" him?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "in righteousness and in truth"?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "unto the end"? When is "the end"?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to have "all the hidden mysteries" revealed? Is there a difference between a mystery and a "hidden mystery"?
  • D&C 76:7. What is the difference between "days" of old and "ages" to come? Is there any deeper significance to using these two different ways of expressing periods of time?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to "make known" something? Is this just another way of saying "reveal"? How does the LORD make things known to us?
  • D&C 76:7. What does the phrase "good pleasure of my will" mean? (See also Eph 1:5.)
  • D&C 76:8. What are the "wonders" of eternity?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "wisdom of the wise"? How does it perish before revealed wisdom and understanding? How does latter day revelation stack up against modern science?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "understanding of the prudent"? Who are "the prudent"?
  • D&C 76:9. Are these statements hyberbolic or is there a greater meaning that we're missing here?
  • D&C 76:13. When is the "beginning" before the world was?
  • D&C 76:13. What are the things that "were ordained of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:13. What does it mean for the Only Begotten Son to be "in the bosom of the Father...from the beginning"?
  • D&C 76:14. Is this vision and section of scripture "the record" which is "the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ?" If so, is this revelation primarily about degrees of glory, as commonly presumed, or about "the fulness of the gospel"?
  • D&C 76:17. How does this verse differ from the KJV of John 5:29? How does the substitution of just/unjust for life/damnation change the meaning of this verse? What is the difference between being resurrected "unto" a resurrection or "in" a resurrection?
  • D&C 76:18. Why might this changed wording or sentiment of John 5:29 cause Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon "to marvel"? Why mention that it "was given...of the Spirit"? Wouldn't that be presumed?
  • D&C 76:19. What does it mean that they "meditated upon these things"? What does it mean to meditate and how should we do it? What is the difference between meditation and prayer?
  • D&C 76:19. What are "the eyes of our understanding"? What does it mean for the LORD to "touch" the eyes of understanding? How are these "eyes" opened?
  • D&C 76:19. What is the "glory of the Lord" and how does it shine "round about"?
  • D&C 76:20. How did Joseph and Sidney "behold" the glory of the Son?
  • D&C 76:20. What does it mean that Joseph and Sidney "received of his fulness"? What is this "fulness"? Is this a fulness of "the Son" or of "the Father" or does it matter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49

D&C 76:26-30

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

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This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

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  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 97:6-10

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  • D&C 97:16. When should we expect to see God in the temple? (See related links)
  • D&C 97:19. Do we believe that God will dwell with us in a literal city here on earth?

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  • D&C 97:15-16. Elder David B Haight explained that the promise to see God in the temple has been fulfilled for some literally. He also explains here though that seeing God can mean "coming to know [God], discerning Him, recognizing Him and His work, perceiving His importance, or coming to understand Him." (See "Temples and Work Therein" from the October 1990 General Conference.)
  • D&C 97:21. Russell M. Nelson, "The Gathering of Scattered Israel," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 79–82. :"Zion is wherever righteous Saints are. Publications, communications, and congregations are now such that nearly all members have access to the doctrines, keys, ordinances, and blessings of the gospel, regardless of their location. Spiritual security will always depend upon how one lives, not where one lives. Saints in every land have equal claim upon the blessings of the Lord."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 121:41-46

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  • D&C 121:36. This verse employs three distinct terms, the relationships among which need to be sorted out carefully: "the rights of the priesthood," "the powers of heaven," and "the principles of righteousness." The two of these terms ("rights" and "powers") are described as being "inseparably connected," while the second and third of these terms ("powers" and "principles" have a more complex relationship, the one ("principles") being a necessary condition for the other ("powers") to be "controlled" or "handled." What is at work in this complex of terms and relationships?
As for the term "rights of the priesthood," it should be noted that the language of "rights" only began to be associated with the priesthood, at least in revelation, in 1835—both in a revelation received that year (D&C 107) and in revisions of a revelation that had been received earlier (D&C 68). It would not be inappropriate to draw a connection between this development and the reception (in December of 1832) of the revelation that is now D&C 86, particularly verses 8-11, where the Saints were, for the first time, informed that they—or at least some of them—were direct descendants of those who had held authority anciently, making them "legal heirs" (cf. D&C 107:40). Of course, the language of "the rights of the priesthood" seldom refers to the right to the priesthood, but much more often refers to the rights of the priesthood, the rights conferred on one through the priesthood. Exemplary are the many references in section 107. Whereas earlier revelations (particularly D&C 20) had made reference first and foremost to the duties of the several offices of the priesthood, this revelation outlined the rights of those same offices (see especially verses 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12). In the end, it seems best to understand the "rights of the priesthood" here in section 121 in this latter manner: in question are the rights the priesthood itself bestows. And, if section 107 is the point of reference for making sense of what is meant by the priesthood's "rights," it seems that what is meant is the right specifically to officiate and to preside.
What, then, of the "powers of heaven"? The phrase is relatively rare in scripture. It's only biblical appearance is in Luke 21:26, though it appears also in Joseph Smith's revision of Matthew 24. In these two texts, the "powers of heaven" are shaken during the eschatological events surrounding the second coming of Christ, and in both cases the shaking of the powers in question is closely associated with the darkening of the sun and the moon, as well as the falling of the stars. The phrase appears three times in the Book of Mormon, all three of these in Third Nephi and on the lips of the Savior: 3 Ne 20:22; 21:25; and 28:7. (Note that the second of these references reads "power of heaven" rather than "powers of heaven" in the current edition. Royal Skousen's Earliest Text, however, provides the reading of "powers of heaven" for this text, bringing it into conformity with the other two references.) In Third Nephi, the phrase always appears in the context of the announcement of Christ's coming to Israel, accompanied by "the powers of heaven." In at least one of these references, it almost seems that "the powers of heaven" refers to actual persons (or angels?) who will accompany Christ to earth. This may be confirmed in Moses 7:27, where the phrase seems again to be a title for angels. At any rate, it seems best to understand the phrase as referring to "supernatural"—and even personal—assistance (or assistants). (Another reference, of no particular help, can be found in D&C 84:119.)
Finally, what is meant by "the principles of righteousness"? Interestingly, this passage marks the only appearance of this phrase in scripture. However, it is perhaps relatively easy to interpret, given that section 121 itself goes on to clarify it—something it does not do with the other terms here under consideration. The key comes only in verses 41-42. Before that, the reader is prepared for the clarification of the term by the references in verses 37 and 39 to "unrighteousness" and "unrighteous dominion." The term itself ("principles of righteousness") is not clarified in these preparatory verses; only the effects of abandoning the principles of righteousness is clarified. But verses 41-42 provide something of a list of principles of righteousness. That it is indeed the principles of righteousness that one finds in that passage is clear from the way that the beginning of verse 41 frames the list: "No power or influence can or ought to be maintained by virtue of the priesthood...." What is intended here, it seems clear, is again, as in verse 36, to draw a distinction between power and priesthood, to distinguish "the powers of heaven" from "the rights of the priesthood." Drawing on (abbreviated forms of) two of the terms from verse 36, it seems clear that the list that follows in verses 41-42 lay out the "principles of righteous" through which power and influence can and apparently ought to be maintained. They are, in the simple form of a list: persuasion, long-suffering, gentleness and meekness, love unfeigned, kindness, and pure knowledge (this last is expounded on a bit in verse 42). The meaning of the third term from verse 36 is thus quite straightforward.
With the terms clarified, what is verse 36 actually saying about the relationships among these three terms? First, quite clearly, it is a question of distinguishing the first two terms. It would seem, then, that those who, according to verse 35, "do not learn this one lesson" make the mistake of conflating "the rights of the priesthood" with "the powers of heaven," of taking the right to officiate or to preside as being equivalent to having access to supernatural assistance (or assistants). It apparently must be made clear, here, that there is a radical break between the right to lead and the ability to wield power: governance and power must be completely uncoupled. The second point being made here, it seems, is that power can in fact be wielded, but that it can only be wielded through the principles of righteousness—regardless, apparently, of whether one holds the rights of the priesthood or not.
But if all this, with so much terminological clarification, seems straightforward enough, it is perhaps complicated to some degree by the introduction, in verse 37, of the term "authority."
  • D&C 121:38: Kick against the pricks. Spencer W. Kimball, in the April 1955 Conference Report, explains this phrase thus: "A goad is defined as a spear or a sharp pointed stick used to sting or prig. The burro who kicks the sharp instrument with which he is being prodded is kicking at the pricks. His retaliation does little damage to the sharp stick or to him who wields it but brings distress to the foot that kicks it."
  • D&C 121:41: No power or influence. One might interpret the beginning of verse 41 as telling us that the priesthood should not be used to maintain power or influence of any kind. In that case the list starting "only by persuasion" would be a list of ways that power or influence ought to be maintained—in lieu of doing so by virtue of the priesthood. Alternately, one could interpret the only here as meaning something like except. In that case the list which begins "only by persuasion" is a list of legitimate ways that the priesthood can maintain power and influence. The difference between these two interpretations is significant in how we look at the role of the priesthood. Should neither power nor influence ever be maintained by virtue of the priesthood? (The first interpretation.) Or, is it part of the legitimate role of the priesthood to maintain power and influence but it must do so only in the prescribed ways listed? (The second interpretation.)
Under either interpretation the most significant point of these verses remains the same—someone who holds the priesthood must seek to influence others through love, persuasion, kindness etc. Reproving others should be done early and only when moved on by the Holy Ghost.
  • D&C 121:41: Only by... This phrase, continuing in the subsequent verses, marks the beginning of a list of how one can (and ought?) to maintain "power or influence." It is important to note that this passage is connected 2 Cor 6:1-13, not only in spirit but on the linguistic level.
  • D&C 121:43: Betimes. Although this word is often taken to mean something like "from time to time," it actually means "early" or "in good season or time" (see Webster's 1828 definition here). This word is used in several other passages in the KJV listed here.
  • D&C 121:45: Confidence. The 1847 New Dictionary of the English Language defines confidences as "To have or place faith or trust in; to credit or give credit; to trust or believe, to be secure or assured, to rely or depend upon; to be firmly, boldly secure" (by Charles Richardson, 1847). This is in-line with the three definitions given in Oxford English Dictionary (OED):
  • The mental attitude of trusting in or relying on a person or thing; firm trust, reliance, faith. Const. in (to, on, upon).
  • The feeling sure or certain of a fact or issue; assurance, certitude; assured expectation.
  • Assurance, boldness, fearlessness, arising from reliance (on oneself, on circumstances, on divine support, etc.)
  • D&C 121:45: Virtue. The Webster's 1828 Dictionary provides ten different definitions of virtue, including strength, bravery, moral goodness, acting power, excellence. In the New Testament, virtue is most often the English translation of the Greek Arete, which conveys a sense of excellence or goodness associated with reaching your utmost potential. This usage is found in Philip 4:8, 1 Pet 2:9 where it is translated as "praises", and 2 Pet 1:3-2 Pet 1:5. Virtue is twice used as the English translation of the Greek Dunamis, which refers to strength, power, and ability (Mark 5:30, Luke 6:19). If Joseph Smith or the Lord is referring to either of these senses of the word "virtue," then its use here has more to do with power, strength, and reaching noble potential, rather than merely chaste or pure sentiments. This reading may be further supported by the very similar usage of virtue (arete) in Philip 4:8--where we are commanded to "think on" virtue (arete).
  • D&C 121:45: Bowels full of charity. If we are "full of charity" then there can be no place in us for ill-feelings. Only the best of feelings should exist between us. This is how we need to feel in order to pray and be confident in the presence of God.
Doctrine distil...as the dews. This reference echoes Deut 32:2, where Moses states that his "doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew." This metaphor is not entirely clear. It may imply that the Spirit will teach us slowly and almost imperceptibly, perhaps without our fully realizing or noticing it. This may be a parallel to what happens in the next verse—with knowledge perhaps drawn to us "without compulsory means" to "flow unto" us forever and ever, as our dominion is described in verse 46.
Thy confidence wax strong. In verse 45 we are told that if we are full of charity toward all men and "let virtue garnish [our] thoughts unceasingly" then our confidence will "wax strong in the presence of God." One way we can understand confidence here is to mean "assurance, boldness, fearlessness" as suggested in the 3rd definition given by the OED (see the lexical notes above). This interpretation can explain Jared's boldness in Ether 3:10. Though the Brother of Jared was struck with fear when he first sees the Lord (when he sees just His finger Ether 3:6), in verse 10 the Brother of Jared shows confidence (when he says "Lord, show thyself unto me"). Reading confidence here as "assurance, boldness, fearlessness," suggests interpreting the Brother of Jared's boldness here as the result of his righteousness—that he was charitable and virtuous.
We can also understand this confidence in the presence of the Lord by understanding what happens in the reverse case. Just as the scriptures tell us that those who have virtuous thoughts will have confidence in the Lord's presence, so they also tells us that those without virtuous thoughts will not have confidence in the presence of God. For example, Alma 12:14 specifically makes the connection between thoughts that condemn us and wanting to hide from the presence of the Lord.
  • D&C 121:46: Scepter. The phrase "scepter of righteousness" only occurs once in the New Testament at Heb 1:8, where it refers to the scepter of God's kingdom. Scepter there is an English translation of the Greek rhabdos, which is elsewhere translated as a rod or staff--including the Lord's "rod of iron" mentioned in Rev 2:27, Rev 12:5, and Rev 19:15.

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  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from setting our hearts upon the things of the world?
  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from aspiring to the honors of men both in the church, and out of the church?
  • D&C 121:44: What does it mean to have faithfulness "stronger than the cords of death"? Why is it important for others to see that faithfulness?
  • D&C 121:45: What is the "doctrine of the priesthood?"
  • D&C 121:45: Does this doctrine differ from the doctrine of the gospel? Is it a subset? A superset?
  • D&C 121:45: What definition of "virtue" might be most applicable in this verse? Is there more involved here then just having pure thoughts?

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  • D&C 121:45. Elder Bruce R. McConkie specifically addresses the question "What is the doctrine of the priesthood?" in his April 1982 General Conference address titled Doctrine of the Priesthood.
  • D&C 121:45. Elaine S. Dalton, "Look toward Eternity!," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 31–32. Speaking of the importance of purity upon confidence, Sister Dalton said "we can confidently enter the holy temples of God with a knowledge that we are worthy to go where the Lord Himself goes. When we are worthy, we can not only enter the temple, the temple can enter us."
  • D&C 121:45. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon states: "It is significant that after inviting us to have charity toward 'all men,' the Lord added the phrase 'and to the household of faith...' Consider the implications when this added phrase is understood to mean more specifically 'your very own household of faith.' Unfortunately, there are a few within the Church who exhibit greater charity toward non-family members than toward their own spouses and children, siblings and parents. They may show feigned kindness publicly while privately sowing and cultivating seeds of contention, demeaning those who should be closest to them. These things should not be."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 136:21-25

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  • D&C 136:37. This verse begins telling the people not to marvel that the ungodly have killed the prophets. Next the Lord gives the audience a reason not to marvel--because they are not pure. The next phrase "ye can not bear my glory" could be read as a consequence of not being pure, or it could be meant as support for the claim that the audience is not yet pure. In the second case the fact that the audience has not yet beheld the glory of the Lord is used as evidence that the people are not yet pure.
  • D&C 136:40. See the Webster's 1828 definition of only. Note there seems to be a typo in the first definition given which presumably should read "Single; one alone; as, John was the only man present."
  • D&C 136:40. Given the surrounding verses, it seems that the purpose of the rhetorical question in this verse is to a) support the previous verses where the Lord explains Joseph Smith's role and explains why Joseph Smith was allowed to die; and b) prepare for the next verses which say something like, "therefore, keep the commandments." One way to interpret this verse, which accomplishes these objectives looks like this:
  • only mean something like "single" or "one alone."
  • the question ends after the word enemies
  • the "in that" in the next phrase refers back to the previous discussion about Joseph Smith's death.
  • "witness of my name" refers to the death of Joseph Smith (and maybe Oliver?) when Joseph sealed his testimony with his name.
Translating all of this, we get something like "You have marveled that Joseph died. It isn't because I didn't have power to save him. Haven't I always delivered you from your enemies? It is only in this case that I let Joseph die that I could have a witness of my name."

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Moses 4:1-5

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Moses > Chapters 3-4 / Verses 3:4-4:32
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Relationship to Moses. The relationship of Chapters 3-4 to the rest of Moses is discussed at Moses.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 3-4 include:

Moses 3:4-4:32 is the Joseph Smith Translation of Genesis 2:3-3:24. This page is not intended, however, to address Genesis. It is intended only to address the Joseph Smith Translation of Genesis. It is therefore suggested that readers consult the page that does address Genesis 2:3-3:24 before viewing this page. Contributors are likewise asked to respect this distinction. The idea is that a reader should be able to find content about an original passage from Genesis on the wiki page addressing that passage.

Verses 3:4-4:32 are the Joseph Smith Translation account of the Fall. The relationship of this account to the rest of the book of Moses is discussed at Moses, and its relationship to the rest of Genesis is discussed at Genesis.

This account can be outlined as follows:

a. Adam placed in Garden, commanded not to eat tree of knowledge (3:4-17)
b. Lord says not good to be alone, Eve, unaware naked (3:18-25)
c. serpent induces Eve to transgress by eating fruit(4:1-11) (4:1-4 new content)
d. Adam & Eve eat and discover nakedness (4:12-13)
c. where art thou? Adam & Eve admit eating fruit (4:14-19)
b. Lord pronounces curses, ground cursed for man’s sake, coats (4:20-27)
a. Adam and Eve know good from evil, driven from Garden, prevented from eating of tree of life (4:28-32)

Discussion[edit]

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  • Moses 3:20: Meet. "Meet" means proper, or fitting.
  • Moses 3:20: Woman. "Woman" The English word "woman" does not, in fact, have a meaning of one being taken out of man. See Related links for a proper etymology.
Throughout this chapter, all the trees, animals, and even Adam himself are brought forth out of the earth/ground/dust. There are two exceptions. One (perhaps) is that the tree of life was planted, rather than brought forth. The second, more striking exception is Eve: perhaps excepting the tree of life, she is the only living thing not brought forth out of the earth. She comes out of man, already a living thing.
  • Moses 4:1-4: Two plans and agency. The 1828 Webster's defines "agency" (verse 3) as "the quality of moving or of exerting power; the state of being in action; action; operation; instrumentality; as, the agency of providence in the natural world."
The first four verses of this chapter describe a time when there are competing plans for the redemption of humankind. Verse 3, by indicating the Satan had rebelled, suggests that the plan as originally envisioned by the Lord God involved human agency, and that Satan's plan would destroy that, although little else is stated about the plans here. It is also suggested here that Satan was attempting to change the Lord God's plan about what approach to take; in other words, the plan adopted wasn't developed by the Beloved Son but had been the Lord God's beforehand.
This section specifies three differences between the plans: 1) In Satan's plan, all people would be redeemed, and "one soul shall not be lost." The implication here is that under the Lord God's plan some souls would indeed be lost. 2) In Satan's plan, full credit for human redemption would belong to Satan. But in the original plan, the one supported by the Beloved Son, glory would belong to the Lord God. 3) In Satan's plan, he would be seen as the son of the Lord God, apparently replacing the Beloved Son in that role.
It is interesting to note that even though Satan was "cast down," a term not defined here, Satan still retained agency, if agency is understood to mean "quality of moving or of exerting power" (1828 Webster's). Verse 4 indicates he retained a great deal of power, although it was limited to influencing only those who "would not hearken unto" the voice of the Lord God.
  • Moses 4:32: The Lord's voice. This note is of the same form as Moses 1:42 excepting that the voice here is clearly the Lord's.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 3:9: And it became also a living soul. In what sense is "it" ("every tree") a living soul? (See also: verse 7 and Abr 5:7.)
  • Moses 3:9. What is the meaning of the sentence "For it was spiritual in the day that I created it, for it remaineth in the sphere in which I, God, created it"? What does it mean to say it remained in the sphere in which God created it? And what does this have to do with being spiritual?
  • Moses 4:6. It would seem that Satan is aware of many things regarding the Lord's plan. What does it mean that he did not know the mind of God?
  • Moses 4:6. Did he not know, then, that he was acting in accordance with the plan in tempting Eve?
  • Moses 4:6. Does this fact have any application for us today?
  • Moses 4:23. The Lord said that he should curse the ground for Adam's sake? How was this curse of benefit to Adam? What ill effects might have resulted had the Lord not cursed the ground?
  • Moses 4:25. Why does this verse mention the sweat of the face as opposed to simply sweat, or perhaps the sweat of one's back, etc.?
  • Moses 4:25. What application does this verse have for us today? (Does it tell us what type of work we should do (physical versus less physical)? Does it tell us how to give or receive gifts from others? Can it be used to guide welfare systems in their formation or administration? Does it suggest how we should teach our children to work? Does it tell how we can use other's thoughts and inventions?)
  • Moses 4:32. If the Lord is speaking here, then is he also the voice of the narrator in chapter 1?
  • Moses 4:32. Who is the Lord speaking to here? (Joseph, the saints, both, or some other entity?)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moses 4:6. James E. Talmage, Articles of Faith, p. 69 -- Talmage suggests that Satan did not realize that God's plan required the Fall to occur.
  • Moses 4:25. J. Reuben Clark, "Private Ownership under the United Order and the Gaurantees of the Constitution", Improvement Era, Nov. 1942 (Address given in the October General Conference of the same year.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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