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Moro 10:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Moroni > Chapter 10
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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Moroni. The relationship of Chapter 1o to the rest of Moroni is addressed at Moroni.

Story. Chapter 10 consists of ____ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapter 10 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Moro 10[edit]

a. exhortation to obtain testimony of the record (1-7a)
• exhortation to remember God's mercifulness (3)
• exhortation to ask God for a witness through the Holy Ghost (4)
• teaching that the Holy Ghost bears witness of truth (5-7a)
b. exhortation to not deny gifts of the Spirit and remember that they are always available (7b-19)
• exhortation to not deny power or gifts of God that are always present in all ages (7b-8a)
• gifts are various and come from God to profit men (8b)
• list of gifts of the Spirit of God (9-16)
• gifts are several and come from Christ (17-18)
• exhortation to remember that these gifts are only done away in any age by unbelief (19)
c. faith, hope and charity are all necessary to be saved (20-23)
• faith, hope and charity are all required (20-21)
• hope is lost through unrighteousness (22)
• faith can work miracles (23)
b. teaching that gifts are only done away by iniquity (24-26)
• gifts are only done away by iniquity (24-26)
a. Moroni's testimony of the record and exhortation to righteousness (27-34)
• exhortation to remember that you will face these words at the judgment bar of God (27-29)
• exhortation to come unto Christ and not touch uncleanness to fulfill the covenant with Israel (30-31)
• exhortation to come unto Christ and deny selves ungodliness to obtain grace and fulfill the covenant of remission of individual sins (32-33)
• farewell until we meet at the judgment bar of God (34)

Moro 10:1-7a[edit]

  • Moro 10:1: I write unto my brethren. Interestingly, Mormon's last words (cf. Morm 7:1) also seem to be directed toward the future Lamanites ("the remnant of this people" in Mormon's words).
  • Moro 10:3-5: Promise extended to everyone. Moroni's promise, originally given to the Lamanites, is frequently extended by today's prophets and apostles to all. See for example Elder Eyring's talk in General Conference May 2004 "In the Strength of the Lord."
  • Moro 10:3-5: It. Moroni could be referring to either "these things" (the Book of Mormon), why it is "wisdom in God" that we are reading "these things" (the Book of Mormon), or the merciful dealings of God with men from Adam to the time of our reading. Any or all of the three provide an opportunity to "see with [our] eyes, and hear with [our] ears, and understand with [our] heart[s]." (Isa 6:10, Matt 13:15, Acts 28:27, 2 Ne 16:10)
  • Moro 10:3-5: Sign-seeking. In response to the question on sign-seeking in relation to Moroni's promise, see commentary by BenRasmussen, including quotes from Elder Oaks and George Q. Cannon.

Moro 10:7b-19[edit]

Moro 10:20-23[edit]

Moro 10:24-26[edit]

Moro 10:27-34[edit]

  • Moro 10:30-33. Moroni's final words and the closing instruction of the Book of Mormon expound a message that constitutes the very essence of the gospel; perfection and sanctification by the grace of God through Christ.
The introduction uses phrases from Isaiah 52:1-2, 11-12 and 54:2, 4, where, in the poetic language of Isaiah, the themes of deliverance from bondage and redemption were directed toward Israel as a nation. There the message, on the surface, was about the Babylonian captivity and national liberation. Here Moroni uses the passages to call the reader into the spiritual liberation and redemption offered to those who "come unto Christ." Here, to rise from the dust and put on the beautiful garments, is a call to come unto Christ and be delivered from bondage to sin and "be no more confounded." To "strengthen thy stakes and enlarge thy borders" uses nomadic imagery of the forsaken wife and points to the reception of the eternal covenant blessings of Abraham.
The repeated phrase "in Christ" comes from Pauline theology and essentially means "through Christ" or "by means of Christ," but also describes the spiritual relationship and mystical union of the believer with the Savior.
An examination of the wealth of passages in scripture that encourage one to "come unto Christ" reveals a unified message that the believer, in return, partakes of some gift; the goodness of God, salvation, redemption, rest, living bread/water, resurrection, etc. It's not that the Savior has merely shown us the way or given us an example as the Master Teacher. There is more. He has something transforming to give to all who will come unto him. It follows then, that the perfection and sanctification that is "in Christ" is given by the grace of God to believers, that they may "become holy, without spot."
The phrase "be perfected in him" (Moro 10:32) recalls the charge in the Sermon on the Mount, delivered by Christ to the Nephites, "that ye should be perfect even as I, or your Father who is in heaven is perfect." (3 Ne 12:48).
The phrase "deny yourselves of all ungodliness" seems to imply the "after all we can do" (2 Ne 25:23) aspect of salvation by grace, but to focus on a sinless existence as the formula for perfection misses the more transcending truth wherein we are made new creatures through the reception of the Spirit by coming unto Christ in the covenant of the Father.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moro 10:3-5: Why directed to Lamanites? "Moroni's Promise" in verses 3-5 was originally given by Moroni to the Lamanites (see verse 1). Latter-day prophets and apostles have since extended this promise to all who read the Book of Mormon (see external links). Why did Moroni specifically direct this promise to the Lamanites?
  • Moro 10:3-5: Ponder What? What is the "it" that Moroni is exhorting his brethren (and everyone) to ponder?
  • Moro 10:3-5: Sign-seeking? Moroni's promise involves us reading and praying and then waiting for a manifestation of an answer. Looking at it this way, gaining a testimony could be considered sign seeking. How is seeking a manifestation of the truthfulness of the Book of Mormon different from seeking a sign?
  • Moro 10:3-5: Receive these things? What does it mean to receive these things? What are these things? The plates? The Book of Mormon as we have it today? Does receiving it necessarily involve following the exhortation given in verse 3? In other words, what must be done, if anything, prior to asking God if "these things are not true" for the promise to take effect (apart from the three conditions listed in the promise itself, although they deserve special attention as well)?
  • * Moro 10:3-5: Not true? Why not true? Following the letter of the promise, few would qualify as actually having tried it out, I imagine, most people ask God if the Book of Mormon is true. Is the "not" not significant?
  • * Moro 10:26. What does it mean to "do these things away"?
  • Moro 10:31. It says for Jerusalem to "put on thy beautiful garments". What is meant by beautiful garments? Is it to be taken in the literal sense or is there a figurative meaning?
  • Moro 10:33. What does it mean to be perfect in Christ? What do we need to do to be perfect in Christ?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moro 10: A close reading. Faulconer, James E. "Sealings and Mercies: Moroni’s Final Exhortations in Moroni 10." In Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture, 22/1 (2013): p. 4-19. Provo, Utah: BYU University: Neil A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. This article is a close reading of Moroni's eight exhortations in chapter 10. The article also demonstrates one way to study scriptures and perhaps to think about them afresh.
  • Moro 10:6: Good, just, and true. See here for a discussion of the relationship between the good, the just and the true.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 1:29

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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Doctrine & Covenants. The relationship of Section 1 to the Doctrine & Covenants as a whole is discussed at Doctrine & Covenants: Unities.

Audience. D&C 1 is addressed to "ye people of my church" and to "all men" as the Lord's Preface to the Book of his Commandments published to the "inhabitants of the earth" (D&C 1:-2, 6, 11, 34)

Story. D&C 1 is the preface or introduction to the Doctrine & Covenants. D&C 1 consists of five major sections. It opens and closes with statements that the Lord’s word is unstoppable; it will go forth and it will be fulfilled, whether spoken by himself or his servants. In between these two statements, the Lord gives three lists: (1) reasons why the Lord's anger is kindled against the world, (2) reasons why the Lord's servants are to preach these commandments to the world, and (3) reasons why these commandments have been given to his servants.

  • Verses 1:1-10: The Lord’s word will go forth and be fulfilled
  • Verses 1:11-16: The Lord's anger is kindled against the world and wicked will be cut off
  • Verses 1:17-23: The Lord's servants are to preach these commandments to the world
  • Verses 1:24-33: The Lord gave these commandments to his servants
  • Verses 1:34-39: The Lord’s word will be fulfilled

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in D&C 1 include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

  • Received: November 1, 1831 at Hiram, Ohio[1]
  • First section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 65
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 67

The immediate setting of D&C 1 was a conference at Hiram, Ohio attended by ten elders including Joseph Smith. The conference was held on November 1-2, 1831, a year and a half after the organization of the Church. The purpose of the conference was to make plans for publishing Joseph Smith’s revelations for the first time. The conference determined to print several thousand copies of the revelations in book form under the name Book of Commandments. D&C 1 was received on the first day of this conference.[2]

William McLellin later recalled that:

A committee had been appointed to draft a preface [to the Book of Commandments], consisting of himself [William McLellin], [Oliver] Cowdery and [probably] Sidney Rigdon, but when they made their report the conference picked it all to pieces. The conference then requested Joseph to inquire of the Lord about it, and he said that he would if the people would bow in prayer with him. This they did, and Joseph prayed. When they arose, Joseph dictated by the Spirit the Preface found in the book of Doctrine & Covenants [D&C 1] while sitting by a window of the room in which the conference was sitting, and Sidney Rigdon wrote it down.[3]

In Revelation Book 1 the following explanation introduces D&C 1:

A Preface or instructions upon the Book of Commandments which were given of the Lord unto his Church through him who he appointed to this work by the voice of his Saints through the prayer of faith.[4]

From this background we learn that D&C 1 is the Preface or Introduction to the Doctrine & Covenants, the book of the Lord’s commandments to the inhabitants of the earth. It is thus intended to orient the reader to the content and purpose of the entire Doctrine & Covenants.

For a brief overview of D&C 1 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 1:2: The penetrating voice of the Lord. The mention here of the eye, the ear, and the heart is clearly reminiscent of Isa 6:9-10. The question here is, not the prophetic mission of Isaiah, but the "voice of the Lord" Himself. However, if one considers the implications of Isaiah's prophetic call (see the commentary for Isaiah 6 at Isa 6:1ff), there is little apparent difference between the message in this passage and the message there: the "voice of the Lord" in Isaiah 6 is a voice of silence that only becomes spoken when taken into the mouth of the prophet (cf. 2 Ne 32:3, etc.), and something similar seems to be at work here in this revealed preface to the Doctrine and Covenants. Perhaps most significant in the phrasing of this issue as it appears in this verse is the concluding "be penetrated." Whereas "see" and "hear" match up perfectly with Isaiah's wording, "penetrate" is unique here. At the same time, however, it beautifully expresses the same spirit that permeates Isaiah: the violence of "penetrate" matches the (necessary) violence of the message, and the saturation implied in Isaiah's babbling manner of delivering the message is powerfully embodied in "penetrate." In short, the voice comes to all just to penetrate, to find its way to the penetralis, the inner shrine or the Holy of Holies.
  • D&C 1:2: None shall escape. Curiously doubling this is the phrase in the first half of the verse: "there is none to escape." Rather than the more common "there is none that shall not hear," etc., the Lord phrases this concept in terms of escape. Those who hear the voice are without means of escaping, without means of getting out of the hold of this "voice of the Lord." Doubling the penetration, which works its way to the inner recesses of one's person, is a hold (a "cape") out ("es" or "ex") of which none can get, an outward seizure accomplished by the freezing voice of the Lord. It might be well to parallel this hold to the "eye" and "ear" of the second part of the verse: this voice will take hold on the eye and on the ear, will take up a hold that cannot be undone by those thereby held. The voice will come in such complete saturation that those hearing and those seeing will be frozen and held.
Escape seems an interesting word choice here also because it is almost always used in scriptures to describe how the righteous will escape judgment in contrast to the wicked who will not. For example, a righteous remnant is described as escaping the judgment that will befall the wicked majority of Israel (e.g. Isa 37:31-32; 45:20; Jer 44:28; Ezek 6:8-9; see also [[Rom 2:3 for specific mention of escaping judgment and D&C 97:22, 25 for the question-answer form "vengeance cometh speedily upon the ungodly . . . and who shall escape it? . . . Zion shall escape if she observe to do all things whatsover I have commanded her." Thus, the choice of the word escape here which includes the righteous and the wicked, read in light of the more conventional use of the term escape, seems to highlight—by way of analogy with the judgment of the wicked—the violent nature of the heart being penetrated. That is, the conspicuous lack of qualification here for the righteous suggests the violent effect the word of God has on everyone's heart. This seems to echo other scriptural phrase that use violent/dramatic terms for the repentance process, e.g. abase, submit, subject, etc. The lack of qualification for the righteous here also brings the story of Jonah to mind which stands out amongst scriptural texts in that the messenger who tries to escape cannot.
  • D&C 1:16: Idolatry. Idolatry seems only to be mentioned one other time in the Doctrine and Covenants (D&C 52:39), although it is a prominent theme of earlier prophets (see the Bible Dictionary and Topical Guide entries). One reason the otherwise infrequent reference to idolatry may be given here is that in the subsequent verses Joseph's call as a prophet is given and explained. Idolatry then serves as a rhetorical device linking Joseph's prophetic calling to the common theme of idolatry spoken against by many former prophets. Related themes, such as worldliness, riches, vanity, pride, etc. are discussed at length in the Doctrine and Covenants, but in terms other than idolatry per se, thus making the occurrence here notable.
  • D&C 1:18. This verse introduces a most curious moment of divine logic, a moment in which the Lord Himself provides reasons for doing His work. Though other moments in scripture present the Lord offering reasons for a particular action, this might be the only occasion in all of scripture where the Lord simply lays out all the reasons He has for getting a plan of salvation under way, for sending messengers to bring further light and knowledge. The list of reasons is surprisingly long (several verses, at any rate), and all of these reasons present vital points of understanding. Each might be considered in turn.
The first of the Lord's reasons for putting together in the first place a plan of salvation is offered in this first verse, but the anticipatory sense that characterizes the first reason complicates it from the beginning. The first reason, quite clearly, is that "all this" is done so "that it might be fulfilled, which was written by the prophets." The point seems quite clear: the prophets are to be fulfilled, and all of this is to that fulfillment. The Lord gets the work of salvation underway precisely so that the prophets are not ashamed, so that their word is confirmed by historical completion. But then there seems to be some difficulty here, because the next verse goes on as if it were quoted quite specifically the word of the prophets. It must be pointed out--even if a little early here--that verse 19 does not quote any known prophecy. It is closest, perhaps, to 1 Cor 1:27, but there is still something of an important gap between the phrasing of verse 19 and that saying by Paul. All in all, though the prophets are here cited, there does not seem to be any particular saying the Lord has in mind: one is to read verse 19 (and the verses that follow it) as a sort of summary of the prophetic message over all. A first--and a major--consequence: the great majority of the weight of the "reasons" the Lord offers to justify His saving activity in the last days is to be felt in this first mention of things, since the following verses are collectively a sort of explanation of the ancient prophet message. Hence, detailed attention must first be paid to this initiating verse 18.
The difficulty, however, of working out the meaning of verse 18 from the start is that the following verses, precisely because they summarize the prophetic work of so many millennia, seem to be the undergirding of why the Lord would desire to confirm the prophets at all. For present purposes, the work must begin, unfortunately, somewhat blindly.
The question to be asked, then, is this: is the whole plan of salvation, as issued through the Prophet Joseph and according to this "last dispensation," entirely motivated by a desire to confirm the ancient prophets? Or perhaps the question to ask is this: if the Lord feels to undertake a justification of sorts, is He here justifying Himself or the prophets? In the end, however the question is asked, the thrust of the difficulty here is bound up with the intertwined roles of the prophet and his God. One must interpret the relation between God and His messengers from the very beginning. The question is perhaps all the more important in the first part of the twenty-first century, because of the radical reinterpretation of the prophetic role that is underway in biblical criticism. If the prophet has been decided now to be a rather political figure, one attuned to contemporary events and one, hence, without the extra-temporal visions that allow his/her words to transcend her/his age, why on earth or in heaven would the Lord feel to justify words one might quite simply bury in the historical melieux of the past? A necessary answer emerges precisely here: the prophets are being misunderstood if they are completely swallowed up in their own history.
What verse 18, especially as it opens the following few verses, accomplishes is this: God is stripped, as it were, of His absoluteness. One must be careful in stating the point, but it seems quite clear. God is, according to the relativization at work in verse 18, not one to offer absolute reasons for things. The opening of a last dispensation is not simply to bring about "new things," unknown before, but also to hark back to the "former things," to bring the former things out in the new things, just as "Second Isaiah" works out and reinterprets "First Isaiah." In short, if Joseph is a prophet, he cannot--absolutely must not--be separated from the former prophets: the message is the same, and the sender of the messengers is the same. If only a few verses after this, the Lord will quite explicitly introduce the necessity of recognizing the historical context into which the modern prophetic activity falls, He quite explicitly introduces here the necessity of recognizing also that these same prophets transcend their historical context because they are fulfilling ancient prophecies. And with that, the Lord can turn to specifications in the next few verses.
  • D&C 1:18-24: A chiasm. As soon as one turns to the passage in which the Lord lays out His very broad interpretation of what has been prophesied all along, one notices that there is a specific structure at work in these verses:
  • And also gave commandments to others, that they should proclaim these things unto the world;
  • and all this that it might be fulfilled, which was written by the prophets--
  • The weak things of the world shall come forth and break down the mighty and strong ones...
  • But that every man might speak in the name of God the Lord, even the Savior of the world;
  • That faith also might increase in the earth;
  • That mine everlasting covenant might be established;
  • That the fulness of my gospel might be proclaimed by the weak and the simple... before kings and rulers.
  • Behold, I am God and have spoken it; these commandments are of me, and were given unto my servants in their weakness,
  • after the manner of their language, that they might come to understanding.
The chiastic structure highlights the fact that this is the Lord's voice in this revelation, but it also accomplishes a couple of interesting poetic things: verse 21 is set at the center of things, and the whole passage is wrapped about with the Lord's clear statement of purpose. Moreover, the everlasting covenant is set parallel to every man's speaking in the name of God the Lord, which is certainly suggestive. Also, the doubling of the word "commandments" seems to highlight the nature of what the Doctrine and Covenants (perhaps more strictly, the Book of Commandments) is all about. At any rate, the structure opens the possibility of considering the passage as a whole.
  • D&C 1:30: Only true and living church. Although it may be possible to read this as meaning "the only true church" and "the only living church," this reading seems strained because of the fact that the word church is only used once. Instead, a more natural way of reading this phrase seems to be that the church is being described as the only one which is both true and living.

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of the section. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

A. Lord’s word will go forth and be fulfilled (1-10)

• Lord's voice will go to all, there is none that shall not hear (1-2)
• the rebellious will be sorrowful for iniquities will become public (3)
• Lord's servants are his voice, so none shall stay them (4-6a)
• this same authority applies to Book of Commandments, so all shall be fulfilled (6b-7)
• Lord's servants have been given power to seal up the wicked unto Second Coming (8-10)
B. Lord's anger is kindled against the world and wicked will be cut off (11-16)
• Lord warns those who will hear to prepare because his anger is kindled against the world (11-13)
• those who will not hear the Lord's voice will be cut off because they: (14)
• have strayed from his ordinances;
• have broken his covenant; and
• seek after idols that will perish when Babylon falls (15-16)
B. Lord's servants to preach these commandments to the world (17-23)
• Lord commands his servants to proclaim these things to the world (17-18a)
• so the weak might break down the strong so that: (18b-19)
• every man might speak in name of Lord rather than counseled by neighbor;
• faith might increase rather than trusting in the arm of flesh; and
• Lord's covenant might be established (19-22)
B. Lord gave these commandments to his servants (24-33)
• Lord gave these commandments to his servants (24)
• so they might come to understanding so that:
• his servants might be instructed, corrected, chastened, and strengthened;
• Joseph Smith might translate the Book of Mormon; and
• his servants might have power to lay the foundation of the Church (25-30)
• but light will be taken from those who repent not (31-33)

A. Lord’s word will be fulfilled (34-39)

• Lord speaks to entire earth and is willing that all should know these things (34-35a)
• the hour is nigh that peace taken from earth and Lord will return in judgment (35b-36)
• search these commandments, for all shall be fulfilled (37)
• whether by Lord's own voice or servants, it is the same (38)
• the Holy Ghost bears record of these truths (39)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • D&C 1 was written down by Sidney Rigdon as it was received during a conference on November 1, 1831. The oldest surviving copy is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 125-27 soon after its receipt.
  • D&C 1 was first published and first received widespread circulation in the March 1833 issue (p. 78) of The Evening and the Morning Star newspaper printed by William Phelps in Jackson County, Missouri.[5]
  • D&C 1 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants as Chapter 1 in the 1833 Book of Commandments, which was also printed by William Phelps during 1833.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 1.

  • D&C 1 was immediately followed by D&C 67 and D&C 68. These three sections comprise a group that were all received during the first conference called to consider publishing Joseph Smith's revelations. These sections address the content and truthfulness of the revelations contained in the Doctrine & Covenants. In contrast, D&C 69 and D&C 70, which were received at another conference later that month, address the mechanics of getting the revelations published.
  • D&C 1 was followed two days later by D&C 133. These two sections are the bookends of the Doctrine & Covenants. D&C 1 appears at the beginning as a Preface, while D&C 133 was placed at the end as an Appendix. Both sections quote many of the same Bible passages.

Parallel passages.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

  • Kelly, William H. Interview with William McLellin, 13 September 1881. In "Letter from Elder W.H. Kelly." In The Saints’ Herald (1 March 1882) Vol. 29 / No. 5, p.66-68. Plano, Illinois, Lamoni, Iowa and Independence, Missouri: Reorganized Church of Latter-day Saints (now Community of Christ), 1860-present.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Revelation Book 1, p.125
  2. Minute Book 2 (1 Nov 1831), p.15-16
  3. Kelly, Interview with William McLellin.
  4. Revelation Book 1, p.125
  5. "Revelations." In The Evening and the Morning Star, original series (March 1833) Vol. 1 / No. 10, p. 78.

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D&C 3

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Summary[edit]

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D&C 3 is addressed to Joseph Smith.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: early July 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

During April - June 1828 Joseph Smith and Martin Harris translated 116 manuscript pages from the Book of Mormon plates at Harmony, Pennsylvania. During that time Martin repeatedly asked Joseph for permission to take the manuscript home to show to his wife at Palmyra, New York. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was told "No." Martin prevailed upon Joseph to ask again with the same result. Finally, on the third request, Joseph was told that Martin could take the manuscript only if he bound himself to certain conditions, including that he was to show the manuscript to only five people. Joseph was also told that he (Joseph) would be responsible for Martin's adherence to these conditions.

Upon returning home to Palmyra, Martin showed the manuscript to several people in violation of the conditions to which he had agreed. After a month, Joseph traveled from Harmony to Palmyra in July 1828 and learned that Martin had lost the 166 page manuscript. Upon returning home to Harmony, Moroni temporarily returned the urim and thummim to Joseph, and through them Joseph received D&C 3.

For a brief overview of D&C 3 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 2 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 4.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:1. Three categories of things ("works," "designs," and "purposes") are described as not being able to do two things ("be frustrated" and "come to naught").
  • D&C 3:3: One eternal round. That which has a beginning will surely have an end. Take a ring, it is without beginning or end; cut it for a beginning place, and at the same time you have an ending place. (Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, p. 60. Webster’s 1828: 1. Anything round, as a ring. 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; recurring in continuance; a cycle; 3. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle. Neal A. Maxwell: "Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round" We mortals sometimes experience boredom in the routine repetition of our mortal tasks, including even good works; and thus vulnerable, we are urged not to grow weary in well doing (Galatians 6:9; D&C 64:33; 84:80; Alma 37:34). But given God's divine love, there is no boredom on His part amid His repetitive work, for his course, though one eternal round, involves continuous redemption for His children." Not My Will, But Thine, p 53.
  • D&C 3:4: For although a man many have many revelations. This verse seems to indicate that Joseph Smith had indeed already had many revelations. Interestingly, however, this revelation is the first that Joseph Smith committed to writing. It thus seems that something about the revelatory experience behind what is now section 3 made Joseph Smith decide to begin recording revelations. What might be behind that decision?
  • D&C 3:7: Feared man. Joseph may have been concerned that Martin Harris might withdraw support and funding.
  • D&C 3:9: Thou art Joseph." It would seem unnecessary to remind him of his name, unless this is a reference to something Joseph had translated, such as the prophecy of a latter-day Joseph.
  • D&C 3:15. All of Section 3 could have been spoken by Moroni, who was Joseph’s primary director and mentor. Notice, for example, that all the references to God and Jesus Christ are in the third person, and the parts that are in the first person could well fit the voice of Moroni. Interestingly, Section 10, which is clearly a sequel, is likely a conflation of two revelations: verses 1-6, which in the same voice as this revelation and was delivered in September 1828, and verses 7ff, which are in the voice of God and were delivered the following May. (See Max H. Parkin, "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10," The Seventh Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, The Doctrine and Covenants, Brigham Young University, 1979, pp 68-84.)

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:2: What does it mean that the God's "course is one eternal round?"

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 3 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 3 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 3.

  • D&C 3 and D&C 10 both address Joseph Smith's loss of the 116 page manuscript and how he should proceed in light of that loss.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • One eternal round Neal A. Maxwell thought this meant that God did the same work over and over: 'Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round."' Not My Will, But Thine, p. 53. ISBN 088494672X
  • D&C 3: Map. The relevant Church history map is here, and here is a picture of the Smith house in Harmony.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a

D&C 3:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 3
Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 3 is addressed to Joseph Smith.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: early July 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

During April - June 1828 Joseph Smith and Martin Harris translated 116 manuscript pages from the Book of Mormon plates at Harmony, Pennsylvania. During that time Martin repeatedly asked Joseph for permission to take the manuscript home to show to his wife at Palmyra, New York. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was told "No." Martin prevailed upon Joseph to ask again with the same result. Finally, on the third request, Joseph was told that Martin could take the manuscript only if he bound himself to certain conditions, including that he was to show the manuscript to only five people. Joseph was also told that he (Joseph) would be responsible for Martin's adherence to these conditions.

Upon returning home to Palmyra, Martin showed the manuscript to several people in violation of the conditions to which he had agreed. After a month, Joseph traveled from Harmony to Palmyra in July 1828 and learned that Martin had lost the 166 page manuscript. Upon returning home to Harmony, Moroni temporarily returned the urim and thummim to Joseph, and through them Joseph received D&C 3.

For a brief overview of D&C 3 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 2 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 4.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:1. Three categories of things ("works," "designs," and "purposes") are described as not being able to do two things ("be frustrated" and "come to naught").
  • D&C 3:3: One eternal round. That which has a beginning will surely have an end. Take a ring, it is without beginning or end; cut it for a beginning place, and at the same time you have an ending place. (Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, p. 60. Webster’s 1828: 1. Anything round, as a ring. 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; recurring in continuance; a cycle; 3. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle. Neal A. Maxwell: "Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round" We mortals sometimes experience boredom in the routine repetition of our mortal tasks, including even good works; and thus vulnerable, we are urged not to grow weary in well doing (Galatians 6:9; D&C 64:33; 84:80; Alma 37:34). But given God's divine love, there is no boredom on His part amid His repetitive work, for his course, though one eternal round, involves continuous redemption for His children." Not My Will, But Thine, p 53.
  • D&C 3:4: For although a man many have many revelations. This verse seems to indicate that Joseph Smith had indeed already had many revelations. Interestingly, however, this revelation is the first that Joseph Smith committed to writing. It thus seems that something about the revelatory experience behind what is now section 3 made Joseph Smith decide to begin recording revelations. What might be behind that decision?
  • D&C 3:7: Feared man. Joseph may have been concerned that Martin Harris might withdraw support and funding.
  • D&C 3:9: Thou art Joseph." It would seem unnecessary to remind him of his name, unless this is a reference to something Joseph had translated, such as the prophecy of a latter-day Joseph.
  • D&C 3:15. All of Section 3 could have been spoken by Moroni, who was Joseph’s primary director and mentor. Notice, for example, that all the references to God and Jesus Christ are in the third person, and the parts that are in the first person could well fit the voice of Moroni. Interestingly, Section 10, which is clearly a sequel, is likely a conflation of two revelations: verses 1-6, which in the same voice as this revelation and was delivered in September 1828, and verses 7ff, which are in the voice of God and were delivered the following May. (See Max H. Parkin, "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10," The Seventh Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, The Doctrine and Covenants, Brigham Young University, 1979, pp 68-84.)

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:2: What does it mean that the God's "course is one eternal round?"

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 3 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 3 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 3.

  • D&C 3 and D&C 10 both address Joseph Smith's loss of the 116 page manuscript and how he should proceed in light of that loss.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • One eternal round Neal A. Maxwell thought this meant that God did the same work over and over: 'Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round."' Not My Will, But Thine, p. 53. ISBN 088494672X
  • D&C 3: Map. The relevant Church history map is here, and here is a picture of the Smith house in Harmony.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a

D&C 3:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 3
Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 3 is addressed to Joseph Smith.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: early July 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

During April - June 1828 Joseph Smith and Martin Harris translated 116 manuscript pages from the Book of Mormon plates at Harmony, Pennsylvania. During that time Martin repeatedly asked Joseph for permission to take the manuscript home to show to his wife at Palmyra, New York. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was told "No." Martin prevailed upon Joseph to ask again with the same result. Finally, on the third request, Joseph was told that Martin could take the manuscript only if he bound himself to certain conditions, including that he was to show the manuscript to only five people. Joseph was also told that he (Joseph) would be responsible for Martin's adherence to these conditions.

Upon returning home to Palmyra, Martin showed the manuscript to several people in violation of the conditions to which he had agreed. After a month, Joseph traveled from Harmony to Palmyra in July 1828 and learned that Martin had lost the 166 page manuscript. Upon returning home to Harmony, Moroni temporarily returned the urim and thummim to Joseph, and through them Joseph received D&C 3.

For a brief overview of D&C 3 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 2 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 4.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:1. Three categories of things ("works," "designs," and "purposes") are described as not being able to do two things ("be frustrated" and "come to naught").
  • D&C 3:3: One eternal round. That which has a beginning will surely have an end. Take a ring, it is without beginning or end; cut it for a beginning place, and at the same time you have an ending place. (Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, p. 60. Webster’s 1828: 1. Anything round, as a ring. 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; recurring in continuance; a cycle; 3. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle. Neal A. Maxwell: "Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round" We mortals sometimes experience boredom in the routine repetition of our mortal tasks, including even good works; and thus vulnerable, we are urged not to grow weary in well doing (Galatians 6:9; D&C 64:33; 84:80; Alma 37:34). But given God's divine love, there is no boredom on His part amid His repetitive work, for his course, though one eternal round, involves continuous redemption for His children." Not My Will, But Thine, p 53.
  • D&C 3:4: For although a man many have many revelations. This verse seems to indicate that Joseph Smith had indeed already had many revelations. Interestingly, however, this revelation is the first that Joseph Smith committed to writing. It thus seems that something about the revelatory experience behind what is now section 3 made Joseph Smith decide to begin recording revelations. What might be behind that decision?
  • D&C 3:7: Feared man. Joseph may have been concerned that Martin Harris might withdraw support and funding.
  • D&C 3:9: Thou art Joseph." It would seem unnecessary to remind him of his name, unless this is a reference to something Joseph had translated, such as the prophecy of a latter-day Joseph.
  • D&C 3:15. All of Section 3 could have been spoken by Moroni, who was Joseph’s primary director and mentor. Notice, for example, that all the references to God and Jesus Christ are in the third person, and the parts that are in the first person could well fit the voice of Moroni. Interestingly, Section 10, which is clearly a sequel, is likely a conflation of two revelations: verses 1-6, which in the same voice as this revelation and was delivered in September 1828, and verses 7ff, which are in the voice of God and were delivered the following May. (See Max H. Parkin, "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10," The Seventh Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, The Doctrine and Covenants, Brigham Young University, 1979, pp 68-84.)

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:2: What does it mean that the God's "course is one eternal round?"

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 3 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 3 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 3.

  • D&C 3 and D&C 10 both address Joseph Smith's loss of the 116 page manuscript and how he should proceed in light of that loss.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • One eternal round Neal A. Maxwell thought this meant that God did the same work over and over: 'Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round."' Not My Will, But Thine, p. 53. ISBN 088494672X
  • D&C 3: Map. The relevant Church history map is here, and here is a picture of the Smith house in Harmony.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a

D&C 3:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 3
Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 3 is addressed to Joseph Smith.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: early July 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

During April - June 1828 Joseph Smith and Martin Harris translated 116 manuscript pages from the Book of Mormon plates at Harmony, Pennsylvania. During that time Martin repeatedly asked Joseph for permission to take the manuscript home to show to his wife at Palmyra, New York. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was told "No." Martin prevailed upon Joseph to ask again with the same result. Finally, on the third request, Joseph was told that Martin could take the manuscript only if he bound himself to certain conditions, including that he was to show the manuscript to only five people. Joseph was also told that he (Joseph) would be responsible for Martin's adherence to these conditions.

Upon returning home to Palmyra, Martin showed the manuscript to several people in violation of the conditions to which he had agreed. After a month, Joseph traveled from Harmony to Palmyra in July 1828 and learned that Martin had lost the 166 page manuscript. Upon returning home to Harmony, Moroni temporarily returned the urim and thummim to Joseph, and through them Joseph received D&C 3.

For a brief overview of D&C 3 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 2 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 4.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:1. Three categories of things ("works," "designs," and "purposes") are described as not being able to do two things ("be frustrated" and "come to naught").
  • D&C 3:3: One eternal round. That which has a beginning will surely have an end. Take a ring, it is without beginning or end; cut it for a beginning place, and at the same time you have an ending place. (Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, p. 60. Webster’s 1828: 1. Anything round, as a ring. 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; recurring in continuance; a cycle; 3. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle. Neal A. Maxwell: "Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round" We mortals sometimes experience boredom in the routine repetition of our mortal tasks, including even good works; and thus vulnerable, we are urged not to grow weary in well doing (Galatians 6:9; D&C 64:33; 84:80; Alma 37:34). But given God's divine love, there is no boredom on His part amid His repetitive work, for his course, though one eternal round, involves continuous redemption for His children." Not My Will, But Thine, p 53.
  • D&C 3:4: For although a man many have many revelations. This verse seems to indicate that Joseph Smith had indeed already had many revelations. Interestingly, however, this revelation is the first that Joseph Smith committed to writing. It thus seems that something about the revelatory experience behind what is now section 3 made Joseph Smith decide to begin recording revelations. What might be behind that decision?
  • D&C 3:7: Feared man. Joseph may have been concerned that Martin Harris might withdraw support and funding.
  • D&C 3:9: Thou art Joseph." It would seem unnecessary to remind him of his name, unless this is a reference to something Joseph had translated, such as the prophecy of a latter-day Joseph.
  • D&C 3:15. All of Section 3 could have been spoken by Moroni, who was Joseph’s primary director and mentor. Notice, for example, that all the references to God and Jesus Christ are in the third person, and the parts that are in the first person could well fit the voice of Moroni. Interestingly, Section 10, which is clearly a sequel, is likely a conflation of two revelations: verses 1-6, which in the same voice as this revelation and was delivered in September 1828, and verses 7ff, which are in the voice of God and were delivered the following May. (See Max H. Parkin, "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10," The Seventh Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, The Doctrine and Covenants, Brigham Young University, 1979, pp 68-84.)

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:2: What does it mean that the God's "course is one eternal round?"

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 3 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 3 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 3.

  • D&C 3 and D&C 10 both address Joseph Smith's loss of the 116 page manuscript and how he should proceed in light of that loss.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • One eternal round Neal A. Maxwell thought this meant that God did the same work over and over: 'Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round."' Not My Will, But Thine, p. 53. ISBN 088494672X
  • D&C 3: Map. The relevant Church history map is here, and here is a picture of the Smith house in Harmony.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a

D&C 3:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 3
Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 3 is addressed to Joseph Smith.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: early July 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 2
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 10

During April - June 1828 Joseph Smith and Martin Harris translated 116 manuscript pages from the Book of Mormon plates at Harmony, Pennsylvania. During that time Martin repeatedly asked Joseph for permission to take the manuscript home to show to his wife at Palmyra, New York. Joseph inquired of the Lord and was told "No." Martin prevailed upon Joseph to ask again with the same result. Finally, on the third request, Joseph was told that Martin could take the manuscript only if he bound himself to certain conditions, including that he was to show the manuscript to only five people. Joseph was also told that he (Joseph) would be responsible for Martin's adherence to these conditions.

Upon returning home to Palmyra, Martin showed the manuscript to several people in violation of the conditions to which he had agreed. After a month, Joseph traveled from Harmony to Palmyra in July 1828 and learned that Martin had lost the 166 page manuscript. Upon returning home to Harmony, Moroni temporarily returned the urim and thummim to Joseph, and through them Joseph received D&C 3.

For a brief overview of D&C 3 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 2 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 4.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:1. Three categories of things ("works," "designs," and "purposes") are described as not being able to do two things ("be frustrated" and "come to naught").
  • D&C 3:3: One eternal round. That which has a beginning will surely have an end. Take a ring, it is without beginning or end; cut it for a beginning place, and at the same time you have an ending place. (Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, p. 60. Webster’s 1828: 1. Anything round, as a ring. 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; recurring in continuance; a cycle; 3. A course of action or conduct performed by a number of persons in turn, or one after another, as if seated in a circle. Neal A. Maxwell: "Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round" We mortals sometimes experience boredom in the routine repetition of our mortal tasks, including even good works; and thus vulnerable, we are urged not to grow weary in well doing (Galatians 6:9; D&C 64:33; 84:80; Alma 37:34). But given God's divine love, there is no boredom on His part amid His repetitive work, for his course, though one eternal round, involves continuous redemption for His children." Not My Will, But Thine, p 53.
  • D&C 3:4: For although a man many have many revelations. This verse seems to indicate that Joseph Smith had indeed already had many revelations. Interestingly, however, this revelation is the first that Joseph Smith committed to writing. It thus seems that something about the revelatory experience behind what is now section 3 made Joseph Smith decide to begin recording revelations. What might be behind that decision?
  • D&C 3:7: Feared man. Joseph may have been concerned that Martin Harris might withdraw support and funding.
  • D&C 3:9: Thou art Joseph." It would seem unnecessary to remind him of his name, unless this is a reference to something Joseph had translated, such as the prophecy of a latter-day Joseph.
  • D&C 3:15. All of Section 3 could have been spoken by Moroni, who was Joseph’s primary director and mentor. Notice, for example, that all the references to God and Jesus Christ are in the third person, and the parts that are in the first person could well fit the voice of Moroni. Interestingly, Section 10, which is clearly a sequel, is likely a conflation of two revelations: verses 1-6, which in the same voice as this revelation and was delivered in September 1828, and verses 7ff, which are in the voice of God and were delivered the following May. (See Max H. Parkin, "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10," The Seventh Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, The Doctrine and Covenants, Brigham Young University, 1979, pp 68-84.)

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 3:2: What does it mean that the God's "course is one eternal round?"

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 3 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 1-2, presumably during the summer of 1830.
  • D&C 3 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 3.

  • D&C 3 and D&C 10 both address Joseph Smith's loss of the 116 page manuscript and how he should proceed in light of that loss.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • One eternal round Neal A. Maxwell thought this meant that God did the same work over and over: 'Repeatedly God has described His course as reiterative, "one eternal round."' Not My Will, But Thine, p. 53. ISBN 088494672X
  • D&C 3: Map. The relevant Church history map is here, and here is a picture of the Smith house in Harmony.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 2                         Next section: D&C 10a


D&C 5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6

D&C 5:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 5
Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5 is directed to Joseph Smith but the discussion relates to Martin Harris.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: March 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 4
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 6

The 116 page manuscript translated by Joseph Smith with Martin Harris' assistance was lost in July 1828. Two months later in September 1828 Joseph again received the Book of Mormon plates from the angel Moroni.

In October 1828 Joseph's parents visited him at Harmony, Pennsylvania from Manchester-Palmyra, New York. They stayed for about three months, returning home in January 1829. During September 1828 - March 1829 Joseph has made very little progress on the Book of Mormon translation.

The immediate setting of D&C 5 was a trip by Martin Harris from Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph at Harmony, Pennsylvania soon afterward in March 1829. "Martin Harris has desired a witness at my [the Lord's hand] that you, my servant Joseph Smith Jr., have got the plates of which you have testified and borne record that you have received of me." (D&C 5:1). Joseph Smith receives D&C 5 in response to this desire of Martin Harris.

For a brief overview of D&C 5 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5:23: And again. The term "and again" is often (though not always) used by Joseph Smith in his revelations to indicate the beginning of a new thought. In other words, the term often indicates a break in the train of thought rather than continuity. In connection with D&C 84:103, John Tvedteness has written: "The words 'And again' at the beginning of [a verse] are used throughout Joseph Smith's revelations to mark places where the Lord gave him supplementary information to a previous revelation, usually the same day, after a break [even though] the whole was considered a single revelation."[1]
D&C 5:23 is the earliest occurrence of this term in the Doctrine & Covenants, and it likely indicates a break in the train of thought. Other places where this term appears to mark a break in the train of thought include:

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 5: Of all the revelations that were adjusted for the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants (from the original texts as they stood in the 1833 Book of Commandments), this one perhaps was changed the most? Why this one, which seems relatively simple or even unimportant?
  • D&C 5:9: What does "those things which I have entrusted unto you" refer to here?
  • D&C 5:10: What does "word" mean in this context?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 5 is _____.
  • D&C 5 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 5

References cited on this page.

  • Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Tvedtness, John A. Historical Perspectives on the Kirthland Revelation Book, p. 424-25. In Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry, and Andrew H. Hedges, eds. The Disciple As Witness: Essays on Later-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, p. 407-33. Provo, Utah: FARMS, 2000.

Previous section: D&C 4                         Next section: D&C 6


D&C 10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
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Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
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Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
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Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11

D&C 10:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 10
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Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 10 likely consists of two parts received several months apart.[1]

Verses 1-37[edit]

  • Received: late September 1828 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 4

The immediate setting of D&C 10:1-37 was

Verses 38-70[edit]

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 13
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 11

The immediate setting of D&C 10:38-70 was

For a brief overview of D&C 10 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading is for an outline of the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 10:34: What does "it" refer to in the phrase "show it not unto the world"?
  • D&C 10:345: What are Nephi's writings being compared to when the Lord says they "throw greater views upon my gospel"?
  • D&C 10:46: Did the Lord reveal these remaining portions of his gospel only because the prophets prayed for them or were they destined to find their way into the scriptures anyway?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 10 (verses 42-70) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 11-12, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ________.
  • D&C 10 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 10.

  • D&C 3 marked the beginning of Joseph Smith's probation following his loss of the 116 page manuscript. The first half of D&C 10 marked the end of that probation and instructed him not to retranslate the lost manuscript. The second half of D&C 10 instructed Joseph to instead replace the lost manuscript by translating the small plates of Nephi (First Nephi through Words of Mormon).

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Parkin, Max H. "A Preliminary Analysis of the Dating of Section 10." In The Seventh Annual Sperry Symposium: The Doctrine & Covenants, p. 68-84. Provo: BYU Press, 1979.

Previous section to 10a: D&C 3                         Next section after 10a: D&C 4
Previous section to 10b: D&C 13                       Next section after 10b: D&C 11


D&C 17

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 17
Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 17 is addressed to the Three Witnesses: Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, and David Whitmer.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: at Fayette, New York on probably 28 June 1829
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 18
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 19

Almost all of the Book of Mormon translation occurred during the three months between April 7, 1829 when Oliver Cowdery began assisting at Harmony, Pennsylvania and the end of June 1829 after they had moved to the Whitmer home at Fayette, New York. Mosiah - Moroni was translated first, and First Nephi - Omni was translated last.

Once Joseph Smith and his assistants learned from Ether 5:2-4; 2 Ne 11:3; 2 Ne 27:12-14 that other witnesses besides Joseph would be allowed to see the plates, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer "became very solicitous" that Joseph ask the Lord if they might be the witnesses spoken of. Joseph did ask, and in response he received D&C 17. (Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 43)

D&C 17 was received on a Sunday morning in late June or early July, most likely on Sunday, June 28.

For a brief overview of D&C 17 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Role of the Three Witnesses in the Restoration[edit]

The role the three witnesses played in the restoration was unique. They were certainly more than just witnesses in the legal sense (although they served this role as well, essentially including their affidavits in the book). They were called by revelation, likely foreordained to their mission, and verse 7 explains that they were given power from on high and a special gift in connection with their calling. Yet their calling came with no formal priesthood keys (in fact, probably only Oliver Cowdery even held the Aaronic priesthood at the time they were shown the plates, and the Melchizedek authority would not have been restored yet in June 1829).

Their mission as witnesses was a lifelong calling that they clearly recognized and continued to fulfill even when they were disaffected from the Church. In fact, it seems their mission was separate from the organization of the Church and often not even under the direction of Church authorities. In contrast, within the Church the formal office of "special witnesses" was filled by the Apostles, who could be argued to carry the role within the Church generally that the three witnesses carry specifically with respect to the Book of Mormon. Perhaps it is not so ironic that the witnesses selected the original twelve apostles, as they had related missions.

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 17 is the one copied by Frederick Williams into Revelation Book 2, p. 119-20 not earlier than November 1834.
  • D&C 17 was first published in the Messenger and Advocate newspaper at Kirtland, September in September 1835 (Vol. 1, No. 12, p. 178).
  • D&C 17 was not included in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 1835 edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 17.

  • Doctrine & Covenants passages addressing witnesses of the Book of Mormon include: D&C 5:11-12, 24 to Martin Harris; D&C 14:8 to David Whitmer; D&C 6:27-28 to Oliver Cowdery (less clear); and possibly also D&C 8:1 to Oliver Cowdery.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19

D&C 17:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 17
Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 17 is addressed to the Three Witnesses: Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, and David Whitmer.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: at Fayette, New York on probably 28 June 1829
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 18
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 19

Almost all of the Book of Mormon translation occurred during the three months between April 7, 1829 when Oliver Cowdery began assisting at Harmony, Pennsylvania and the end of June 1829 after they had moved to the Whitmer home at Fayette, New York. Mosiah - Moroni was translated first, and First Nephi - Omni was translated last.

Once Joseph Smith and his assistants learned from Ether 5:2-4; 2 Ne 11:3; 2 Ne 27:12-14 that other witnesses besides Joseph would be allowed to see the plates, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer "became very solicitous" that Joseph ask the Lord if they might be the witnesses spoken of. Joseph did ask, and in response he received D&C 17. (Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 43)

D&C 17 was received on a Sunday morning in late June or early July, most likely on Sunday, June 28.

For a brief overview of D&C 17 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Role of the Three Witnesses in the Restoration[edit]

The role the three witnesses played in the restoration was unique. They were certainly more than just witnesses in the legal sense (although they served this role as well, essentially including their affidavits in the book). They were called by revelation, likely foreordained to their mission, and verse 7 explains that they were given power from on high and a special gift in connection with their calling. Yet their calling came with no formal priesthood keys (in fact, probably only Oliver Cowdery even held the Aaronic priesthood at the time they were shown the plates, and the Melchizedek authority would not have been restored yet in June 1829).

Their mission as witnesses was a lifelong calling that they clearly recognized and continued to fulfill even when they were disaffected from the Church. In fact, it seems their mission was separate from the organization of the Church and often not even under the direction of Church authorities. In contrast, within the Church the formal office of "special witnesses" was filled by the Apostles, who could be argued to carry the role within the Church generally that the three witnesses carry specifically with respect to the Book of Mormon. Perhaps it is not so ironic that the witnesses selected the original twelve apostles, as they had related missions.

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 17 is the one copied by Frederick Williams into Revelation Book 2, p. 119-20 not earlier than November 1834.
  • D&C 17 was first published in the Messenger and Advocate newspaper at Kirtland, September in September 1835 (Vol. 1, No. 12, p. 178).
  • D&C 17 was not included in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 1835 edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 17.

  • Doctrine & Covenants passages addressing witnesses of the Book of Mormon include: D&C 5:11-12, 24 to Martin Harris; D&C 14:8 to David Whitmer; D&C 6:27-28 to Oliver Cowdery (less clear); and possibly also D&C 8:1 to Oliver Cowdery.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19

D&C 17:6-9

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 17
Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 17 is addressed to the Three Witnesses: Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, and David Whitmer.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: at Fayette, New York on probably 28 June 1829
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 18
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 19

Almost all of the Book of Mormon translation occurred during the three months between April 7, 1829 when Oliver Cowdery began assisting at Harmony, Pennsylvania and the end of June 1829 after they had moved to the Whitmer home at Fayette, New York. Mosiah - Moroni was translated first, and First Nephi - Omni was translated last.

Once Joseph Smith and his assistants learned from Ether 5:2-4; 2 Ne 11:3; 2 Ne 27:12-14 that other witnesses besides Joseph would be allowed to see the plates, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer "became very solicitous" that Joseph ask the Lord if they might be the witnesses spoken of. Joseph did ask, and in response he received D&C 17. (Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 43)

D&C 17 was received on a Sunday morning in late June or early July, most likely on Sunday, June 28.

For a brief overview of D&C 17 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Role of the Three Witnesses in the Restoration[edit]

The role the three witnesses played in the restoration was unique. They were certainly more than just witnesses in the legal sense (although they served this role as well, essentially including their affidavits in the book). They were called by revelation, likely foreordained to their mission, and verse 7 explains that they were given power from on high and a special gift in connection with their calling. Yet their calling came with no formal priesthood keys (in fact, probably only Oliver Cowdery even held the Aaronic priesthood at the time they were shown the plates, and the Melchizedek authority would not have been restored yet in June 1829).

Their mission as witnesses was a lifelong calling that they clearly recognized and continued to fulfill even when they were disaffected from the Church. In fact, it seems their mission was separate from the organization of the Church and often not even under the direction of Church authorities. In contrast, within the Church the formal office of "special witnesses" was filled by the Apostles, who could be argued to carry the role within the Church generally that the three witnesses carry specifically with respect to the Book of Mormon. Perhaps it is not so ironic that the witnesses selected the original twelve apostles, as they had related missions.

Outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 17 is the one copied by Frederick Williams into Revelation Book 2, p. 119-20 not earlier than November 1834.
  • D&C 17 was first published in the Messenger and Advocate newspaper at Kirtland, September in September 1835 (Vol. 1, No. 12, p. 178).
  • D&C 17 was not included in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 1835 edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 17.

  • Doctrine & Covenants passages addressing witnesses of the Book of Mormon include: D&C 5:11-12, 24 to Martin Harris; D&C 14:8 to David Whitmer; D&C 6:27-28 to Oliver Cowdery (less clear); and possibly also D&C 8:1 to Oliver Cowdery.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 18                         Next section: D&C 19


D&C 19:26

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 19
Previous section: D&C 17                         Next section: D&C 20


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Summary[edit]

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received: March 1830 at Manchester-Palmyra, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 17
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 21

The Book of Mormon translation was completed, and the angel Moroni appeared to the Three Witnesses, including Martin Harris, in late June or early July 1829. Joseph Smith afterward spent most of his time at home in Harmony, Pennsylvania while Oliver Cowdery and Hyrum Smith oversaw the printing at Palmyra, New York.

About nine months later the Book of Mormon became available for purchase at Palmyra on Friday, March 26, 1830, and the Church was organized eleven days after that at Fayette, New York on Tuesday, April 6, 1830.

In late March 1830, shortly before these last two two events, Joseph Knight Sr. took Joseph Smith by wagon from his home at Harmony to his parents' house at Manchester-Palmyra. Upon arriving at Palmyra they found Martin Harris crossing the street with several copies of the Book of Mormon. Martin had previously pledged his farm as security for the cost of printing, and he was therefore worried about losing his farm if the books did not sell. Martin told Joseph Smith three or four times that he must have another revelation or "commandment." Joseph put him off each time and told him to "fulfill what you have got." That night Joseph Smith, Joseph Knight Sr. and Martin Harris all slept at the Smith home.

The next morning Martin again insisted that he must have a commandment and then returned to his own home at Palmyra. That afternoon Joseph Smith received D&C 19, and Oliver Cowdery wrote it down.

For a brief overview of D&C 19 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 4 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

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  • D&C 19:6.' It is not clear what is going on in this verse. From reading this section we might come up with the following reading (called "first reading" hereafter). Other places in the scriptures say that those who don't repent (see verse 4), or in other words those found on his left hand in the day of judgment (see verse 5), will receive endless torment. And readers may have presumed that this meant that there would be no end to their torment. However, the Lord explains here that "endless" is another name for himself. Thus what reads "endless torment" can be understood as "God's punishment"--which may have an end. This section (following this same reading) explains that if one fails to repent one can suffer as Christ suffered but still inherit a kingdom of glory after.
Of course, this first reading, goes beyond the text in explaining how someone who suffers as God suffers can inherit a kingdom of glory after "paying" for their sins. But, not without some cause. For the text's stress that "endless torment" does not mean there will be no end to the torment, seems to only have a point if in fact there can be an end to this torment. And in our concept of 3 degrees of glory and outer darkness, the only place left is in one of the degrees of glory.
This first reading though is not without its problems.
First, it seems minor, but it is strange that after explaining how "endless" is a name for God, the phrase "endless torment" is replaced with "God's punishment." See further discussion of this point here.
More importantly this view doesn't fit all scriptures that mention endless torment. Consider those cases where "endless torment" is mentioned in the scriptures (2 Ne 9:19-26, 2 Ne 28:23, Jacob 6:10, Mosiah 3:25, Mosiah 28:3, Moro 8:21). We can categorize these in three sets: (a) those which fit well within the interpetation given in the first reading, (b) those which the first interpretation of D&C 19:6 is irrelevant, and (c) those which seem to contradict the first reading.
(a) Mosiah 28:3 and Moro 8:21 work well with the intepretation given in the first reading.
(b) For 2 Ne 9:19-26, 2 Ne 28:23, Jacob 6:10 the first interpretation makes little difference. In these verses endless torment is not used to describe the torment received by someone but rather a place some will go as punishment. Since these verses don't tell us that someone who goes there cannot return, the place can be a place forever of torment without any particular person ever having to stay there forever.
(c) Mosiah 3:25 is at odds with the first reading. In the previous verse King Benjamin tells the people that at the judgment day people will be judged according to their works, either good or evil. Then in verse 25, King Benjamin says that those who are judged evil will "shrink ... into a state of misery and endless torment, from whence they can no more return." The difficulty here is that substituting "endless torment" for God's punishment is insufficient to suggest (as needed for the first reading) that this punishment can end because we still have the clause "from whence they can no more return."
We must also consider D&C 76:44, given two years after this revelation. Though it doesn't specifically use the phrase "endless torment," it does use the phrase "endless punishment" and identifies that with torment. The D&C 76 revelation is prompted by Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon meditating on the meaning of John 5:29. John 5:29 says that those who have done good are resurrected "unto the resurrection of life" while those who have done evil are resurrected "unto the resurrection of damnation." It seems the question in their mind was something like "what is a resurrection of damnation" or maybe "who will receive this resurrection of damnation." If we look at verse 44 as an answer to those question we get: All except the sons of perdition receive the resurrection of life and only the sons of perdition receive the resurrection of damnation.
But if we take this section to be telling us that at least some who receive "endless punishment" can have an end to their punishment and we assume that D&C 76:44 tells us that the sons of perdition cannot have an end to their punishment and then we are left with the odd idea that those discussed in this section as not repenting are those who are resurrected to a resurrection of life. This is odd because John is suggests that in the good from evil division John makes those who do evil and do not repent fall in the good bucket.
Another possibility is that the sons of perdition do not receive a punishment with no end. That is what this verse (verse 6) is saying. Though this seems to contradict D&C 76:44, a closer reading reveals that D&C 76:44 never explicitly says that there will be no end to their punishment only that the place of punishment has no end--just like the verses discussed in the paragraph above labeled (b).
Another possibility is that the resurrection of damnation is not a resurrection only the sons of perdition receive, but rather, all who do not repent. It is a resurrection of damnation because, as is explained in this section, those who receive it will have to suffer as Christ suffered. This is explained in this section. What D&C 76 teaches us is that in the group of those who receive a resurrection of damnation the sons of perdition hold a special place because they are not saved after their sufferings.
Another possibility is that the sons of perdition do receive a torment that has no end and that King Benjamin was referring to the sons of perdition when he says that says that they cannot return from their torment.
Another possibility is that King Benjamin was wrong when saying that those whose works are judged evil will suffer a torment that has no end. In verse 8 of this section Christ tells us that he is going to explain a mystery known by his apostles. The mystery is that endless torment doesn't mean no end to torment. King Benjamin did not know this mystery. Given what he did know, it was reasonable for him to say that there would not be an end to people's torment whose works had been judged evil. But in light of the knowledge we have from this section, we know that this was wrong.
[Note these are not mutually exclusive possibilities. This needs further work to clarify the relationship between these possibilities].

Outline and page map[edit]

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  • Section 19 can be outlined as follows:
A. Teachings about the atonement and punishment for sin (1-20)
  • all men must suffer for their sins on the day of judgment if they do not repent (3-5)
  • the length of punishment for sin is not endless, but is instead the punishment meted out by an endless God (6-12)
  • the Lord commands Martin Harris, in order to avoid that punishment, to repent and obey the commandments received through Joseph Smith (13-15, 20)
  • the intensity of punishment is that same exquisite pain suffered by Christ during his atonement, the smallest portion of which Martin Harris tasted at the time the Lord withdrew his Spirit (15-20)
B. Instruction to Martin Harris regarding conduct (21-41)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 19:8: Even as mine apostles. What apostles does this verse refer to? Is this referring to a particular mystery that the apostles knew about, or is this referring more to a general kind of knowing mysteries—for example, understanding the parables Jesus taught (cf. Matt 13:11; Mark 4:11; Luke 8:10)?
  • D&C 19:11-15: What does this passage teach about the Savior’s suffering for us?
  • D&C 19:11-15: Why was Jesus willing to experience such great suffering for us?
  • D&C 19:21: What do "these things" refer to?
  • D&C 19:28: Is there a difference between praying before the world and praying in public? Or praying in secret and praying in private?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 19 (verses 20-41) is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 27-28, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest complete surviving copy of D&C 19 is ______.
  • D&C 19 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 19.

  • D&C 18 and D&C 19 can be read as a pair in which D&C 18 to two of the Three Witnesses emphasizes the joy available through mercy, while D&C 19 to the other Witness emphasizes the dread of justice. In addition, D&C 18:10-18 provides the clearest statement of why missionaries preach, and D&C 18:21-22, 41-45 provides the most detailed instruction so far regarding what they are to preach: repentance, baptism and endurance to the end. D&C 19:21-22, 30-31 likewise instructs Martin Harris, the other of the Three Witnesses, to preach only faith, repentance, and baptism by water and the Holy Ghost, to not preach new doctrines, and to not contend.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 19:16-20: Keith R. Edwards, "That They Might Know Thee," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 99–101. Elder Edwards said: "The great and exquisite suffering of the Savior was for us, to keep us from having to suffer as He suffered. However, suffering is a part of life, and few will escape its grasp. Since it is something that each of us has gone through, is going through, or will go through, there is scriptural suggestion that we can learn spiritual lessons if we can approach suffering, sorrow, or grief with a focus on Christ."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 17                         Next section: D&C 20


D&C 20:1-16

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:1-16
Previous page: Section 20                      Next page: Verses 20:17-37


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:1-16 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:1-16 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:6. This verse brings up the repentance of Joseph. There may be several reasons this was included. One, it may serve to remind those close to him that while he was mortal and at times foolish, he had repented and the Lord saw him as mature enough to receive angels and perform a great work. Two, it may be included as a reminder of God's "grace" (see verse 4). All of us need repentance; and this latter day work is a proclamation of the principles of the gospel. Three, it may serve to give us a simple narrative framework. He received a remission of his sins (the First Vision). Then he was "entangled"(v.5), and felt a need to repent. It was this feeling that led him to pray, which led to the visitation of Moroni (v.6). That visit brought him commandments and power (v.7-8), which led to the translation of the Book of Mormon.
  • D&C 20:8. The phrase in this verse, "the means which were before prepared" likely refers to the Urim and Thummim which was buried by Moroni with the gold plates.
  • D&C 20:9-12. These verses all seem to be connected to the Book of Mormon. The Book of Mormon:
  • is a record of a fallen people (v.9)
  • contains a fulness of the gospel (v.9)
  • is to Gentiles and Jews (v.9)
  • given by inspiration (v.10)
  • confirmed by angels to others, and declared by witnesses to the world (v.10)
  • also proves that the scriptures (the Bible as already received by the world) are true (v.11)
  • proves that God calls men now as He did in past (v.11)
  • this shows that he is the same God yesterday, today, and forever (v.12)
This seems to be one way to read the logic running through these verses.
  • D&C 20:11. One way to read verse 11 is that the Book of Mormon is doing the proving. It proves to the world that "the holy scriptures" - meaning the scriptures the world already has, i.e., the Holy Bible) - are true. See 1 Nephi 13:39-40.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:2-3: Why are Joseph and Oliver called the "first elder" and "second elder"?
  • D&C 20:4: To what does the word “this” refer in the first phrase of this verse? What does it mean to say that something is “according to the grace of our Lord"? What does the phrase “to whom be all glory, both now and forever” mean? What does that phrase tell us?
  • D&C 20:5-12: Notice that this is one long sentence. What’s this sentence as a whole about?
  • D&C 20:5-6: Verse 12 ends the sentence stretching from verses 5-12. There the Lord says "proving to the world that the holy scriptures are true." Here, at the beginning of the same sentence, in verses 5 and 6, the Lord recounts Joseph's sin and repentance. Is the fact that Joseph Smith sinned and then repented part of what proves that the holy scriptures are true? If so, how? If not, why does the Lord bring up Joseph's sin and repentance here?
  • D&C 20:5: What does it mean to receive a remission of sin? How do we get entangled in the vanities of the world? What does “vanities of the world” mean?
  • D&C 20:6: Do we know to what angelic visitation this verse refers?
  • D&C 20:7: How can commandments inspire us?
  • D&C 20:8: We probably all know what “power from on high” means. And we all know what it means to translate the Book of Mormon. But what does it mean that Joseph was given power to translate “by the means which were before prepared"?
  • D&C 20:9: Were the descendants of Lehi the only people in the world who enjoyed the fulness of the gospel between the end of Christ's mortal ministry and the dawning of the dispensation of the fulness of times?
  • D&C 20:10: When this verse says the Book of Mormon was given by inspiration, is it referring to the inspiration the Lord gave the Book of Mormon prophets or to the inspiration he gave Joseph Smith? When the verse says the Book of Mormon “is confirmed to others by the ministering of angels,” of whom is it speaking? Who is it that declares the Book of Mormon to the world?
  • D&C 20:11: Is it the presence of the Book of Mormon that constitutes the proof or the confirmation one receives through the Spirit?
  • D&C 20:12: Did God start out as a God or was there a different God before him?
  • D&C 20:13: What does the pronoun "them" refer to? Does it mean that the world will be judged out of the books (Book of Mormon and Bible)? The witness in this verse would then refer to the Three and Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon and/or perhaps any one who preaches the scriptures to the world.

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 20                      Next page: Verses 20:17-37


D&C 33:16-18

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 33
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 33 is addressed to __

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 32
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 34

For a brief overview of D&C 33 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 33:3-4. If the field is white, in other words, ripe for harvest (verse 3) how can it also be that the vineyard has become completely corrupted (verse 4)?
  • D&C 33:3-4. Does “they” refer to the few who do good?
  • D&C 33:3-4. To whom does “all” refer? Everyone living, all priests, someone or something else?
  • D&C 33:5. What does it mean to say that the Church has been “called forth out of the wilderness"? The reference seems to be to the story of Moses and Israel. How is that story relevant?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 33 is __.
  • D&C 33 was first published in __.
  • D&C 33 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 33.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 32                         Next section: D&C 34


D&C 42:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 42 > Verses 42:11-17
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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 42. The relationship of Verses 42:11-17 to the rest of Section 42 is discussed at D&C 42.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 42:11-17 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 42:12. Verse 12 is directed to the “elders, priests, and teachers.” Since verse 11 right before it is directed to the missionary effort of preaching the gospel, it is tempting to read verses 12-17 as simply talking about the same issue. However, it is important to note that D&C 20 and D&C 84 clearly state that teachers, one of the three groups addressed in verse 12, are to stay with the church and not travel. D&C 20 also explains that all three offices have a responsibility to teach in church meetings. Since at least one of the offices addressed in verse 12 is not assigned any missionary duties, and all three offices do have a responsibility to teach in their church meetings, it is possible at least to read verse 12 as dealing with teaching specifically in church meeting settings. With this setting in mind, verse 12 explains that their sermons should teach the “principles of the gospel” - faith, repentance, baptism, Holy Ghost - with the Bible and Book of Mormon as the source.
  • D&C 42:13. Verse 13 commands them to observe the “covenants and church articles.” This was a phrase commonly used to refer to section 20 of the Doctrine and Covenants, which recorded the duties these of elders, priests, and teachers. One of these duties listed in D&C 20 was to “conduct the meetings as [...] led by the Holy Ghost.” The remainder of verse 13 echoes this commandment by directing them to teach “as they shall be directed by the Spirit.”
  • D&C 42:14. Verse 14 continues the theme and explains this process further: “And the Spirit shall be given unto you by the prayer of faith.” Faith is necessary, as is the process of asking. Yet, verse 14 opens up the possibility that even with this the Spirit might not come. “If ye receive not the Spirit,” it says, “ye shall not teach.”
  • D&C 42:14: Not teach. There are several ways of interpreting this direction to "not teach." One reading is to assume that if one does not have enough faith to receive the Spirit, then one should not teach until that faith is present. A second reading suggests that like the Saints mentioned in D&C 50, it is possible to mistake other powerful influences as being the Spirit. To avoid this, a teacher ought to pray for the power to teach and see if it is granted. Then one can know that the power being sought is of God (for example, it might be inappropriate to share a personal story or a phrase from a patriarchal blessing, even though the teacher knows it would draw the attention of the class. Praying first and receiving the Spirit would enable the teacher to proceed without concern). A third possible interpretation is that a teacher should be open to the Spirit directing them to do something other than teaching - perhaps spending the time praying, singing, exhorting, or conducting a conversation with class members (see Moroni 6:9).

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 42:14. When do we know that we should not teach?
  • D&C 42:15. Why all this "until the fulness of my scriptures is given"?
  • D&C 42:14, 16. What is the difference between teaching by the Spirit and speaking by the Comforter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • A paper titled: "'To Teach or Not to Teach': Three Possible Interpretations of D&C 42:12-14" presented at the Embracing the Law seminar conference, is available in podcast form at mormontheologyseminar.org[1]
  • Blog post[2] analyzing verses 12-14 and applying this to teaching Young Womens
  • See discussion on these verses by participants in a Mormon Theology Seminar project at Embracingthelaw.wordpress.com [3]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 84:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:43-59
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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:43-59 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:43-59 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:53-55. A series of linguistic parallels and connections forms a sort of web that spreads across these three verses, one that opens possibilities for interpretation of a most important and fascinating problem: the nature of the "condemnation" that is only (to be?) lifted when the saints turn to the Book of Mormon. Some explication of this structural web will open the possibility of discussing that condemnation and, in one sense, the purpose of the Book of Mormon.
A first, and the weakest, connection in these verses is between "know" in verse 53 and "minds" in verse 54. The connection seems warranted because of the departure from the previous verses that is marked by these two words. Starting in verse 43, the passage has been to this point a question of "heed," "word," "Spirit," "light," "com[ing]," "voice," "teach[ing]," etc. In other words, the language has been primarily "physical" or "corporeal." With the shift in these two verses to "knowledge" and the "mind," there is an emphatic move from the bodily to the mental. Further characterizing this shift is another change in focus: the preceding verses seem broadly to be focused on "the world," whereas with verse 53, the focus seems to shift towards the saints. In other words, at the threshold of verse 53, the Lord leaves off the world to speak of (and not only to) the saints. Better: the theme of "the world" is now drawn into the purview of the saints who are addressed by the revelation, as verse 53 makes abundantly clear. But this first connection really only marks the boundaries of the passage/web in question.
A second connection is much clearer: the "darkness" of verse 53 and the "darkened" of verse 54. Most significantly, this greatly clarifies the first connection. If the Lord moves from dealing with the world to dealing with the saints, He does so by drawing a parallel between the two: "the whole world groaneth under... darkness," and the "minds" of the saints "have been darkened." In other words, if it at first appears that the Lord moves from discussing the wickedness of the world to celebrating the righteousness of the saints, that appearance is quickly shattered by the clear parallel between the darkness under which the whole world groans and the darkening of the minds of the saints because of their own "vanity and unbelief." This second connection is, however, not quite so simple. The language of verse 53 suggests an incapacity on the world's part: the groans mark the undesirability of the situation, and the word "under" makes explicit that the world has no apparent means of escape. In fact, the language here suggests a connection with Rom 8:22, where Paul understands "the world" not to be a symbol of "the wicked" or even "the masses," but of "the creation": "the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now." The connection between the verse in Romans and verse 53 here are obvious, but Paul's take on things changes everything: the world is the world as created, the groans are the groans of a woman giving birth, and the "even now" is paralleled by an "until now" that marks a near end of the awful situation. In other words, it appears that the darkness of the world is the darkness of the womb immediately before a child is delivered into the light (the light of verse 45?). The saints who have received the covenant have received it, according to verse 48, "for the sake of the whole world," as if assigned to deliver the world from darkness as one delivers a child into the light. Now, if the darkness that reigns over "the whole world" marks the incapacity of the world to escape the darkness without the help of the saints, then the "darkened" minds of the saints is a much different situation: this darkness comes because of "vanity and unbelief," comes to those who are light, whose minds are filled with light, because they choose to darken what is already lighted. In other words, the linguistic connection between the darkness of the world and the darkened minds of the saints suggests a great disparity: the saints, whose minds have been lighted up (by the covenant, etc.), have allowed that light to be darkened even as they have the task to bring "the whole world" (which cannot do it itself) into that light. In short, the saints have not only "treated lightly the things [they] received," they have turned from the task implied in that reception of light, the task of bringing the world out of its darkness and into the same light.
A third connection, this one a double connection, emphasizes this rejection on the saints' part of the divine task. The word "unbelief" shows up in both verse 54 and verse 55. The connection is obvious, for the same unbelief is in question in both instances. But unbelief is paired in verse 55 with "vanity." The implication seems to be that "because you have treated lightly the things you have received" is to be understood as bearing the name of "vanity." This is made explicit by the opening "which" of verse 55. This connection is rather obvious, perhaps seeming even banal when mentioned. However, it opens up a careful clarification at work in these verses. If there is reason to connect these verses already to Paul's discourse in Romans chapter 8, then this unbelief/vanity business ought to be read in light of Rom 8:20, where Paul gives a sort of "genealogy" of vanity. He explains that "the creature [the Greek means "creation," just as in verse 22] was made subject to vanity," and this "by reason of him who hath subjected the same in hope." As odd as it may sound, Paul seems to be suggesting that "vanity" arises because of hope, because one moves "beyond" faith (is this what is here meant by "unbelief"?) and into hope. In other words, if faith is--as it seems to be in the OT--a turning towards a voice that calls, and if hope is--as it seems to be in the OT--a turning from the world (and all within it) consequent to one's faith, then hope might be characterized as a sort of "unbelief" and, as Paul clearly suggests, a sort of "vanity." Turning from the world in hope, in hope for "a better world" (Ether 12:4), the saints appear to have become so focused on the glories of another realm that they entirely left off faith and charity: They seem to have turned from the faith they once had (what will be called "the former commandments" and--of course--the "Book of Mormon" in verse 57), and to have ignored the task embodied in the covenant confirmed upon them (the task of delivering the world from darkness into the light of their long-since faith). Though this seems a somewhat radical reading, it is a fruitful one, and it makes some sense of these verses.
When the Lord goes on to show the saints the result of this "vanity and unbelief," a fourth (and, for now, final) connection arises: these attitudes "have brought the whole church under condemnation" in verse 55. This phrase is obviously parallel to verse 53, where "the whole world groaneth under sin and darkness." The parallel sets "the whole world" next to "the whole church," and "under sin and darkness" next to "under condemnation." Though darkened minds have also--though only "in times past"--been a result of unbelief and vanity, this ultimate condemnation is not to be equated with it (it is not, after all, anything past, but something now and unrelentingly future... "until..."). In other words, the darkened minds of the saints have been a symptom of the misguided hope (a "zeal without knowledge"?), but the Lord's response is something far severer: church-wide condemnation. The gap, then, between the world and the saints that seemed indicated in the first connection mentioned above here almost disappears: just as the world is held under the sway of something awful, so the saints are in much the same situation, awaiting deliverance like "the whole world."
These four connections weave together a structural web that tie these three verses together, allowing them to define the condemnation that will be taken up in terms of the Book of Mormon in verse 57.
  • D&C 84:56: Condemnation. This further clarification of the "condemnation" that is upon the saints (see commentary on D&C 84:53-55) is crucial in two respects. For one, it is clear that the condemnation is not to be understood on an individual basis, this and that saint being condemned because of their attitude towards the things received. Rather, the condemnation is, regardless of whether the sin is, universal among the saints. The condemnation is, in other words, a corporate condemnation, a condemnation of the whole gathered people. Second, the condemnation is said here to be upon "the children of Zion," rather than the Church. While it is clear that "the children of Zion" means something like "the Church," this alternate name secures the relation between the condemnation under consideration and the broader revelation in which it comes (a revelation concerned primarily with Zion; see commentary at D&C 84:1). This double clarification of the condemnation points toward verse 59: the condemned "children of the kingdom" are unworthy to receive the "holy land" of Zion. This condemnation must not be taken out of context, then: it is to be read in terms of the saints' establishment in Zion and their building there a temple.
  • D&C 84:57: Covenant renewed. The "covenant ... renewed" anticipates the language of verse 57, which speaks of "the new covenant" in relation to "the former commandments."
  • D&C 84:57. The conditions for release from condemnation are now stated clearly (though they will be reworked in verse 61). First, of course, is repentance, but the repentance--followed as it is by an immediate "and"--seems to be not a separate work from the remembrance discussed so much as a broad way of characterizing the remembrance enjoined upon the saints. In other words, to "repent" here seems precisely to mean to "remember...." The work of remembrance commanded, however, is not so simple.
To be remembered: "the new covenant." Because the Lord goes on to clarify the meaning of "the new covenant," it becomes clear that this "new covenant" (so interestingly absolutized with the definite article) is something never discussed as such elsewhere in the D&C. The new covenant, apparently, consists of "the Book of Mormon and the former commandments." It appears, in other words, to mean the Book of Mormon and the (at this point, printing) Book of Commandments. In short, the saints are to "remember" the several revelations given through Joseph Smith up to the point of this commandment. There is, however, another way to read the phrase, if one re-punctuates the text. Inserting a comma after "Mormon," one might read "new" as structurally parallel to "former": "remember the new covenant, even the Book of Mormon, and the former commandments which I have given them...." The phrase, "even the Book of Mormon," would then appear almost parenthetical: "remember the new covenant (even the Book of Mormon), and the former commandments which I have given them...." A careful consideration of the interplay of "new covenant" and "former commandments" may well confirm this reading.
The phrase "new covenant" would be a better translation of the title commonly translated "New Testament." Diatheke means, literally, covenant--not testament. If one thinks the parallelism between "the new covenant" and "the former commandments" in these terms, there is a close parallel between the Lord's injunction here and the early Christian interpretation of the Bible's double nature (Novum Testamentum in Vetere latet, Vetus in Novo patet, the New Testament is concealed within the Old, and the Old Testament is revealed by the New). The Lord might well be calling the Book of Mormon a sort of new New Testament here, relegating the Bible as a whole to the position of "the former commandments." The obvious echo here of Isaiah's "new things"/"former things" theme (found throughout Second Isaiah) also might confirm this reading (especially because the Nephite record employs very carefully that double Isaianic theme to read the "new things" as the Christian atonement, the "former things" as the Abrahamic covenant?). In other words, the Book of Mormon seems here to be understood as a "new covenant" that takes up and interprets the "former commandments" of Biblical Christianity, in fact as the new covenant that does so. It is this radical relation between the Book of Mormon and the Bible that seems to be what the saints have missed in their "hope" (see commentary, again, at D&C 84:53-55).
Given the peculiar relation between the Book of Mormon and the Bible in the (radical?) interpretation above, the word "remember" becomes significant. The word is of peculiar importance in the cultus of the Old Testament, and it therefore becomes the focal point of the New Testament cultus. In other words, that the Lord here employs the word "remember" already seems to suggest a rather cultic setting in which to understand the injunction given to the saints. The Hebrew zkr is the word translated in terms of remembrance in the Old Testament, and its meaning seems to govern the concept throughout the scriptures. The word means, not just to bring again to mind, but to bring again to reality, to re-enact, to re-commemorate, in short, to bring again into presence. Thus the most important New Testament instance of the word is in the Last Supper: "do this in remembrance of me," bringing the Christ's death/resurrection back into presence so as to experience it (and its healing power) again and again. Feeling these overtones here, to "remember the new covenant" is suddenly recognizable as an even more direct allusion to the Eucharistic themes of the New Testament: "this is my blood of the new testament [or covenant]" (Matt 26:28). But even with all this contextualization, it is not exactly clear what it would mean "to remember" the Book of Mormon (and, apparently through it, the Bible).
Most helpful, then, is the Lord's own clarification of the phrase: "not only to say, but to do according to that which I have written." The Lord Himself introduces the polarity of what Paul Ricoeur calls "manifestation and proclamation," the word and the sacrament (the latter term understood in the broadest sense). Such a polarity was introduced (or, at least, radically emphasized) by the Reformation: sola scritura (the word) was pitted against a sort of obsession with "the sacred" (the sacraments). Such a radical distancing of the two poles is ultimately damaging, and the Lord seems here to be destroying the dichotomy: a return to--a remembrance of--the Book of Mormon and the Bible is to be marked both by the rigor of the protestant student of the word and by the ritual, even existential attendance of the Catholic worshipper. To "remember": study as obedience, obedience as study. Again, to "remember": works as grace, grace as works. Again, to "remember": not only hope (a ceaseless talking, "saying," about a "better world"), but charity (a ceaseless working, "doing," towards a "better world"). In other words, and in short, the hope (a hope that draws vanity; see commentary at D&C 84:53-55) of the saints is to be doubled with charity.
In the end, then, a remembrance of the Book of Mormon (and the Bible "through" it) is what will lift the condemnation, a condemnation that was specifically a result of the saints' directedness away from the world (a sort of Mormon neo-Platonism). To return to those sacred texts is, in the end, to return to the earth, to, as verse 58 puts it, "bring forth fruit meet for their Father's kingdom," a kingdom to be built on the earth, and at a very specific place according to the revelation that opens this very section. The specific "doing" to be undertaken becomes clear with the remainder of the section: in verse 61, the saints are told they will be forgiven if they will bear "testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you," the new covenant and the former things (hence, "proclamation"), all the while remaining "steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer," attending constantly to the sacraments of a sacred God (hence, "manifestation").
A brief excursus might conclude this discussion. The call to remember is often a call to faith, a call to trust the historical events (or texts, or commandments) that have gone before. If the commentary presented here and at verses 53-55 are correct, this call to remembrance might well be a petition on the Lord's part to ground hope with faith. The vanity for which the saints are condemned seems to be a sort of hope without faith--and certainly, as argued here, a hope without charity--that must be regrounded in faith. If hope is an orientation to eschatological possibility, then the Lord seems to be pointing out the saints that such an orientation must arise out of and remain grounded in a historical faith if it is not to become a sort of vanity. Or, in other words, vanity seems to be a movement towards hope from faith that leaves the latter off, and precisely for that reason, never attains to a real hope: neither real faith nor real hope, one hovers between them in pure frustration (even boredom?). That the Lord goes on to clarify the means of changing this situation as a focus on charity (the doing, not just the saying) suggests that the limbo state between faith and hope can only be overcome when one is transfigured by charity: in love, one grounds hope in faith. To remember: faith, grounding hope, opens onto charity.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:51. What is "the bondage of sin"? How does coming unto the LORD free one from this bondage?
  • D&C 84:52. How does one "receive" the voice of the LORD?
  • D&C 84:52. Why does the LORD use the term "voice"? How is this "voice" similar or different from other voices we might hear? Is it a literal voice, or is this a metaphor for some other way of communicating?
  • D&C 84:53. What is the "by this" that allows us to know the righteous from the wicked?
  • D&C 84:53. What does it mean that the world "groaneth" under sin?
  • D&C 84:53. What is the nature of the "darkness" that the world is under? What is the source of this darkness?
  • D&C 84:54. What does it mean to have minds "darkened because of unbelief"?
  • D&C 84:54. How might the Saints "have treated lightly the things which [they] have received"? Is this because, as Givens argues, the early saints cherished the Book of Mormon more as a symbol and sign and less for its substance?
  • D&C 84:55. What is this vanity that the LORD refers to?
  • D&C 84:55. What is the LORD accusing the Saints of not believing?
  • D&C 84:55. Were the early Saints so smugly satisfied with their knowledge of the Bible that they felt the Book of Mormon would add little to what they already knew?
  • D&C 84:56. Which branches of the House of Israel, if any, are exempt from this condemnation?
  • D&C 84:57. Are the saints under command to create a collective memory of the Book of Mormon?
  • D&C 84:57. Are we being told to feast upon the Book of Mormon collectively, and not just individually?
  • D&C 84:58. What will this collectively-produced fruit look like and how will it be different from the fruits of our individual actions?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 84:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:43-59
Previous page: Verses 84:31-42                      Next page: Verses 84:60-120


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:43-59 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:43-59 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:53-55. A series of linguistic parallels and connections forms a sort of web that spreads across these three verses, one that opens possibilities for interpretation of a most important and fascinating problem: the nature of the "condemnation" that is only (to be?) lifted when the saints turn to the Book of Mormon. Some explication of this structural web will open the possibility of discussing that condemnation and, in one sense, the purpose of the Book of Mormon.
A first, and the weakest, connection in these verses is between "know" in verse 53 and "minds" in verse 54. The connection seems warranted because of the departure from the previous verses that is marked by these two words. Starting in verse 43, the passage has been to this point a question of "heed," "word," "Spirit," "light," "com[ing]," "voice," "teach[ing]," etc. In other words, the language has been primarily "physical" or "corporeal." With the shift in these two verses to "knowledge" and the "mind," there is an emphatic move from the bodily to the mental. Further characterizing this shift is another change in focus: the preceding verses seem broadly to be focused on "the world," whereas with verse 53, the focus seems to shift towards the saints. In other words, at the threshold of verse 53, the Lord leaves off the world to speak of (and not only to) the saints. Better: the theme of "the world" is now drawn into the purview of the saints who are addressed by the revelation, as verse 53 makes abundantly clear. But this first connection really only marks the boundaries of the passage/web in question.
A second connection is much clearer: the "darkness" of verse 53 and the "darkened" of verse 54. Most significantly, this greatly clarifies the first connection. If the Lord moves from dealing with the world to dealing with the saints, He does so by drawing a parallel between the two: "the whole world groaneth under... darkness," and the "minds" of the saints "have been darkened." In other words, if it at first appears that the Lord moves from discussing the wickedness of the world to celebrating the righteousness of the saints, that appearance is quickly shattered by the clear parallel between the darkness under which the whole world groans and the darkening of the minds of the saints because of their own "vanity and unbelief." This second connection is, however, not quite so simple. The language of verse 53 suggests an incapacity on the world's part: the groans mark the undesirability of the situation, and the word "under" makes explicit that the world has no apparent means of escape. In fact, the language here suggests a connection with Rom 8:22, where Paul understands "the world" not to be a symbol of "the wicked" or even "the masses," but of "the creation": "the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now." The connection between the verse in Romans and verse 53 here are obvious, but Paul's take on things changes everything: the world is the world as created, the groans are the groans of a woman giving birth, and the "even now" is paralleled by an "until now" that marks a near end of the awful situation. In other words, it appears that the darkness of the world is the darkness of the womb immediately before a child is delivered into the light (the light of verse 45?). The saints who have received the covenant have received it, according to verse 48, "for the sake of the whole world," as if assigned to deliver the world from darkness as one delivers a child into the light. Now, if the darkness that reigns over "the whole world" marks the incapacity of the world to escape the darkness without the help of the saints, then the "darkened" minds of the saints is a much different situation: this darkness comes because of "vanity and unbelief," comes to those who are light, whose minds are filled with light, because they choose to darken what is already lighted. In other words, the linguistic connection between the darkness of the world and the darkened minds of the saints suggests a great disparity: the saints, whose minds have been lighted up (by the covenant, etc.), have allowed that light to be darkened even as they have the task to bring "the whole world" (which cannot do it itself) into that light. In short, the saints have not only "treated lightly the things [they] received," they have turned from the task implied in that reception of light, the task of bringing the world out of its darkness and into the same light.
A third connection, this one a double connection, emphasizes this rejection on the saints' part of the divine task. The word "unbelief" shows up in both verse 54 and verse 55. The connection is obvious, for the same unbelief is in question in both instances. But unbelief is paired in verse 55 with "vanity." The implication seems to be that "because you have treated lightly the things you have received" is to be understood as bearing the name of "vanity." This is made explicit by the opening "which" of verse 55. This connection is rather obvious, perhaps seeming even banal when mentioned. However, it opens up a careful clarification at work in these verses. If there is reason to connect these verses already to Paul's discourse in Romans chapter 8, then this unbelief/vanity business ought to be read in light of Rom 8:20, where Paul gives a sort of "genealogy" of vanity. He explains that "the creature [the Greek means "creation," just as in verse 22] was made subject to vanity," and this "by reason of him who hath subjected the same in hope." As odd as it may sound, Paul seems to be suggesting that "vanity" arises because of hope, because one moves "beyond" faith (is this what is here meant by "unbelief"?) and into hope. In other words, if faith is--as it seems to be in the OT--a turning towards a voice that calls, and if hope is--as it seems to be in the OT--a turning from the world (and all within it) consequent to one's faith, then hope might be characterized as a sort of "unbelief" and, as Paul clearly suggests, a sort of "vanity." Turning from the world in hope, in hope for "a better world" (Ether 12:4), the saints appear to have become so focused on the glories of another realm that they entirely left off faith and charity: They seem to have turned from the faith they once had (what will be called "the former commandments" and--of course--the "Book of Mormon" in verse 57), and to have ignored the task embodied in the covenant confirmed upon them (the task of delivering the world from darkness into the light of their long-since faith). Though this seems a somewhat radical reading, it is a fruitful one, and it makes some sense of these verses.
When the Lord goes on to show the saints the result of this "vanity and unbelief," a fourth (and, for now, final) connection arises: these attitudes "have brought the whole church under condemnation" in verse 55. This phrase is obviously parallel to verse 53, where "the whole world groaneth under sin and darkness." The parallel sets "the whole world" next to "the whole church," and "under sin and darkness" next to "under condemnation." Though darkened minds have also--though only "in times past"--been a result of unbelief and vanity, this ultimate condemnation is not to be equated with it (it is not, after all, anything past, but something now and unrelentingly future... "until..."). In other words, the darkened minds of the saints have been a symptom of the misguided hope (a "zeal without knowledge"?), but the Lord's response is something far severer: church-wide condemnation. The gap, then, between the world and the saints that seemed indicated in the first connection mentioned above here almost disappears: just as the world is held under the sway of something awful, so the saints are in much the same situation, awaiting deliverance like "the whole world."
These four connections weave together a structural web that tie these three verses together, allowing them to define the condemnation that will be taken up in terms of the Book of Mormon in verse 57.
  • D&C 84:56: Condemnation. This further clarification of the "condemnation" that is upon the saints (see commentary on D&C 84:53-55) is crucial in two respects. For one, it is clear that the condemnation is not to be understood on an individual basis, this and that saint being condemned because of their attitude towards the things received. Rather, the condemnation is, regardless of whether the sin is, universal among the saints. The condemnation is, in other words, a corporate condemnation, a condemnation of the whole gathered people. Second, the condemnation is said here to be upon "the children of Zion," rather than the Church. While it is clear that "the children of Zion" means something like "the Church," this alternate name secures the relation between the condemnation under consideration and the broader revelation in which it comes (a revelation concerned primarily with Zion; see commentary at D&C 84:1). This double clarification of the condemnation points toward verse 59: the condemned "children of the kingdom" are unworthy to receive the "holy land" of Zion. This condemnation must not be taken out of context, then: it is to be read in terms of the saints' establishment in Zion and their building there a temple.
  • D&C 84:57: Covenant renewed. The "covenant ... renewed" anticipates the language of verse 57, which speaks of "the new covenant" in relation to "the former commandments."
  • D&C 84:57. The conditions for release from condemnation are now stated clearly (though they will be reworked in verse 61). First, of course, is repentance, but the repentance--followed as it is by an immediate "and"--seems to be not a separate work from the remembrance discussed so much as a broad way of characterizing the remembrance enjoined upon the saints. In other words, to "repent" here seems precisely to mean to "remember...." The work of remembrance commanded, however, is not so simple.
To be remembered: "the new covenant." Because the Lord goes on to clarify the meaning of "the new covenant," it becomes clear that this "new covenant" (so interestingly absolutized with the definite article) is something never discussed as such elsewhere in the D&C. The new covenant, apparently, consists of "the Book of Mormon and the former commandments." It appears, in other words, to mean the Book of Mormon and the (at this point, printing) Book of Commandments. In short, the saints are to "remember" the several revelations given through Joseph Smith up to the point of this commandment. There is, however, another way to read the phrase, if one re-punctuates the text. Inserting a comma after "Mormon," one might read "new" as structurally parallel to "former": "remember the new covenant, even the Book of Mormon, and the former commandments which I have given them...." The phrase, "even the Book of Mormon," would then appear almost parenthetical: "remember the new covenant (even the Book of Mormon), and the former commandments which I have given them...." A careful consideration of the interplay of "new covenant" and "former commandments" may well confirm this reading.
The phrase "new covenant" would be a better translation of the title commonly translated "New Testament." Diatheke means, literally, covenant--not testament. If one thinks the parallelism between "the new covenant" and "the former commandments" in these terms, there is a close parallel between the Lord's injunction here and the early Christian interpretation of the Bible's double nature (Novum Testamentum in Vetere latet, Vetus in Novo patet, the New Testament is concealed within the Old, and the Old Testament is revealed by the New). The Lord might well be calling the Book of Mormon a sort of new New Testament here, relegating the Bible as a whole to the position of "the former commandments." The obvious echo here of Isaiah's "new things"/"former things" theme (found throughout Second Isaiah) also might confirm this reading (especially because the Nephite record employs very carefully that double Isaianic theme to read the "new things" as the Christian atonement, the "former things" as the Abrahamic covenant?). In other words, the Book of Mormon seems here to be understood as a "new covenant" that takes up and interprets the "former commandments" of Biblical Christianity, in fact as the new covenant that does so. It is this radical relation between the Book of Mormon and the Bible that seems to be what the saints have missed in their "hope" (see commentary, again, at D&C 84:53-55).
Given the peculiar relation between the Book of Mormon and the Bible in the (radical?) interpretation above, the word "remember" becomes significant. The word is of peculiar importance in the cultus of the Old Testament, and it therefore becomes the focal point of the New Testament cultus. In other words, that the Lord here employs the word "remember" already seems to suggest a rather cultic setting in which to understand the injunction given to the saints. The Hebrew zkr is the word translated in terms of remembrance in the Old Testament, and its meaning seems to govern the concept throughout the scriptures. The word means, not just to bring again to mind, but to bring again to reality, to re-enact, to re-commemorate, in short, to bring again into presence. Thus the most important New Testament instance of the word is in the Last Supper: "do this in remembrance of me," bringing the Christ's death/resurrection back into presence so as to experience it (and its healing power) again and again. Feeling these overtones here, to "remember the new covenant" is suddenly recognizable as an even more direct allusion to the Eucharistic themes of the New Testament: "this is my blood of the new testament [or covenant]" (Matt 26:28). But even with all this contextualization, it is not exactly clear what it would mean "to remember" the Book of Mormon (and, apparently through it, the Bible).
Most helpful, then, is the Lord's own clarification of the phrase: "not only to say, but to do according to that which I have written." The Lord Himself introduces the polarity of what Paul Ricoeur calls "manifestation and proclamation," the word and the sacrament (the latter term understood in the broadest sense). Such a polarity was introduced (or, at least, radically emphasized) by the Reformation: sola scritura (the word) was pitted against a sort of obsession with "the sacred" (the sacraments). Such a radical distancing of the two poles is ultimately damaging, and the Lord seems here to be destroying the dichotomy: a return to--a remembrance of--the Book of Mormon and the Bible is to be marked both by the rigor of the protestant student of the word and by the ritual, even existential attendance of the Catholic worshipper. To "remember": study as obedience, obedience as study. Again, to "remember": works as grace, grace as works. Again, to "remember": not only hope (a ceaseless talking, "saying," about a "better world"), but charity (a ceaseless working, "doing," towards a "better world"). In other words, and in short, the hope (a hope that draws vanity; see commentary at D&C 84:53-55) of the saints is to be doubled with charity.
In the end, then, a remembrance of the Book of Mormon (and the Bible "through" it) is what will lift the condemnation, a condemnation that was specifically a result of the saints' directedness away from the world (a sort of Mormon neo-Platonism). To return to those sacred texts is, in the end, to return to the earth, to, as verse 58 puts it, "bring forth fruit meet for their Father's kingdom," a kingdom to be built on the earth, and at a very specific place according to the revelation that opens this very section. The specific "doing" to be undertaken becomes clear with the remainder of the section: in verse 61, the saints are told they will be forgiven if they will bear "testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you," the new covenant and the former things (hence, "proclamation"), all the while remaining "steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer," attending constantly to the sacraments of a sacred God (hence, "manifestation").
A brief excursus might conclude this discussion. The call to remember is often a call to faith, a call to trust the historical events (or texts, or commandments) that have gone before. If the commentary presented here and at verses 53-55 are correct, this call to remembrance might well be a petition on the Lord's part to ground hope with faith. The vanity for which the saints are condemned seems to be a sort of hope without faith--and certainly, as argued here, a hope without charity--that must be regrounded in faith. If hope is an orientation to eschatological possibility, then the Lord seems to be pointing out the saints that such an orientation must arise out of and remain grounded in a historical faith if it is not to become a sort of vanity. Or, in other words, vanity seems to be a movement towards hope from faith that leaves the latter off, and precisely for that reason, never attains to a real hope: neither real faith nor real hope, one hovers between them in pure frustration (even boredom?). That the Lord goes on to clarify the means of changing this situation as a focus on charity (the doing, not just the saying) suggests that the limbo state between faith and hope can only be overcome when one is transfigured by charity: in love, one grounds hope in faith. To remember: faith, grounding hope, opens onto charity.

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  • D&C 84:51. What is "the bondage of sin"? How does coming unto the LORD free one from this bondage?
  • D&C 84:52. How does one "receive" the voice of the LORD?
  • D&C 84:52. Why does the LORD use the term "voice"? How is this "voice" similar or different from other voices we might hear? Is it a literal voice, or is this a metaphor for some other way of communicating?
  • D&C 84:53. What is the "by this" that allows us to know the righteous from the wicked?
  • D&C 84:53. What does it mean that the world "groaneth" under sin?
  • D&C 84:53. What is the nature of the "darkness" that the world is under? What is the source of this darkness?
  • D&C 84:54. What does it mean to have minds "darkened because of unbelief"?
  • D&C 84:54. How might the Saints "have treated lightly the things which [they] have received"? Is this because, as Givens argues, the early saints cherished the Book of Mormon more as a symbol and sign and less for its substance?
  • D&C 84:55. What is this vanity that the LORD refers to?
  • D&C 84:55. What is the LORD accusing the Saints of not believing?
  • D&C 84:55. Were the early Saints so smugly satisfied with their knowledge of the Bible that they felt the Book of Mormon would add little to what they already knew?
  • D&C 84:56. Which branches of the House of Israel, if any, are exempt from this condemnation?
  • D&C 84:57. Are the saints under command to create a collective memory of the Book of Mormon?
  • D&C 84:57. Are we being told to feast upon the Book of Mormon collectively, and not just individually?
  • D&C 84:58. What will this collectively-produced fruit look like and how will it be different from the fruits of our individual actions?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 84:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:60-120
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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:60-120 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:60-120 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:61. Here the Lord takes up what might be read as an implication of verse 57 (see commentary there) and renders it a commandment: "not only to say, but to do" here becomes "remain steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer, in bearing testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you." It is key that with the fulfillment of this one commandment, the sins (the darkened minds, the slighting of the scriptures, etc.) of the saints are to be forgiven. The one commandment is, however, not quite so simple as just "preaching the word." What the Lord seems to be commanding the saints to do specifically is to proclaim the gospel in a certain way, as guided, that is, by remaining "steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer." What this means must be worked out, and the working out must be guided by the preliminary commentary worked out at verse 57.
The most important point seems to be that the Lord here draws together the word (communication) and the Word (worship or praise): the saints are to declare the word to the world, but they are to do so while constantly presenting themselves before the Word. The work of proclaiming the gospel, in other words, is not only a question of making sure that a message gets across. At the same time, neither is it a question only of praying that God accomplishes the work. Perhaps the two tasks--here drawn together--might be better understood by tying them to a distinction drawn in D&C 20:57: vocal prayer vs. secret prayer. In that verse, the priests are commanded to visit the house of the members of the Church and to exhort them to "pray vocally and in secret." The distinction is fruitful: vocal prayer seems primarily to be a question of communal praise, and secret prayer seems primarily to be a question of personal counsel and even--perhaps often--complaint. These two tasks to which one is summoned by the visiting priest might be taken as a guide to thinking the question this verse raises: to "remain steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer" might just be to "pray...in secret," and "bearing testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you" might just be to "pray vocally." In other words, bearing testimony before all the world might well be a question of praise, of going before the world quite simply to praise God in His glory. Remaining in the meanwhile steadfast in solemn prayer might well be, then, the continual work of counseling with and complaining to the Lord. Before men, one praises God; in one's closet, one chides Him.
These two attitudes--which are here drawn together in the same task--might offer an interpretive framework for reading, say, the collective Psalms: there are psalms of complaint (all of which are written in a very personal I-Thou idiom), and there are psalms of praise (all of which involve others in the prayer, as with the constant refrain "Hallelujah," "praise ye the Lord"). What is so peculiar about all of this is that the two tasks are, for all intents and purposes, here drawn together into one task: one is to praise God before the world while counseling with the Lord in secret. The combination calls to mind, perhaps, the double task Paul gives to the Corinthian saints: "Wherefore let him that speaketh in an unknown tongue pray that he may interpret" (1 Cor 14:13). Paul, later in the same chapter, states this task negatively, and perhaps for that reason, more explicitly, more powerfully: "But if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God" (1 Cor 14:28). Two tasks are, according to Paul, to be performed together: prayer directed precisely to God, and words of exhortation directed precisely to the church. In short, faith (private prayer) without works (the communicating word) is dead, and works (the communicating word) without faith (private prayer) is dead.
But perhaps this tie to Paul's discourse on the gift of tongues opens up another way of understanding the double task and the distinction drawn in D&C 20:57: secret prayer might be a question of "the tongue of angels" (2 Ne 31:13) and vocal prayer of "the tongues of men" (1 Cor 13:1). The question might be tied, that is, to themes that pervade Isa 6 and 28: a missionary--one sent specifically by God as Isaiah had been--is one who inhabits two realms, one who has been in the Holy of Holies and yet dwells on earth, one who thus speaks two entirely different tongues (the angelic tongue registering as sheer noise in the earth, and the tongues of men registering as inarticulate cries in the heavens). To do missionary work--and, according to D&C 20:57, patriarchal work--in God's way is, in the end, to be the link between two realms, to be after the order of the Son of God, to be like the Christ who in His very incarnation is the veil that faces both the heavenly and the earthly realms (see Heb 10:20). Perhaps it is for this very reason that missionary work--and fatherhood, for that matter--are questions of priesthood.
  • D&C 84:85. One way to interpret the phrase, "take no thought before hand what ye shall say", which is parallel to vs 81, "take ye no thought for the morrow" is to think about temperance. We have been counseled to "prepare every needful thing." (D&C 88:119) There is a good and appropriate amount of time to spend preparing. Once we have spent that amount of time, it becomes worrying about "what ye shall say." Worrying about what you shall say, shows a lack of trust. Prepare for the morrow, don't worry about the morrow. Prepare for what you shall say, don't go overboard and worry about what ye shall say. Once you are prepared (in whatever form that will take), "treasure up in your minds continually the words of life" and spend your energy and resources living in the present.
If you link the ideas from D&C 88:118-126 (preparing with temperance and above all charity which bonds perfectness and peace (godliness?) and I will receive you.) with these verses 81-85, there are some common themes that possibly connect with ideas in the commentary on 88:51-65 (vanity, turning away from the world in hope for "a better world", breaking improper dichotomies by combining hope with faith that leads to charity and action, drawing together the word (communication) and the Word (worship or praise) to reach the world where and how they can best be reached (which may begin with or without faith), and preparing the world to receive God). D&C 88:118 says that "And as all have not faith, seek ye diligently and teach one another words of wisdom; yea, seek ye out of the best books words of wisdom; seek learning, even by study and also by faith." This seems to reference the same ideas in the commentary on verse 57 of radically distancing the two poles of studying the words of wisdom out of the best books, the best minds of man, the "words of life", experiences of man maybe. I'm hesitant to use the term "philosophies of man" because it can have a negative connotation, but is there a positive side to "the philosophies of man" that we are excluding in our study and use in preaching the gospel, because we see it as opposed to faith? Could these also be included in the "words of life" that we should be treasuring?
Verse 118 tells us that not all have faith. Not having faith does not exclude those people from truth. Truth stands alone, with or without faith because it is eternally truth. For people without faith, we are counseled here to use the "words of wisdom from the best books" available and compliment that with faith. Can we say, "These two attitudes--which are here drawn together in the same task", revealing the truth of God through the "words of life"? Is the Lord asking us to "destroy the dichotomy" and "return to the rigor of the protestant student of the word" combined, not mingled with scripture. (revised from commentary in 88:57)
D&C Sunday School Lesson 13 is entitled, "This Generation Shall Have My Word Through You." The lesson focuses on all the incredible knowledge we have received through Joseph Smith. In likening the scriptures unto us, could D&C 84 be teaching us what we need to do to be an effective instrument in fulfilling our part of the covenant to share God's words to this generation through us? Can we be the angels that are bringing God's word to help bring them to Christ? Can we be the servant that brings forth fruit one hundred fold?

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:85. Are we really all expected to teach this way? If not, then how are we to interpret this verse? In President Ezra Taft Benson's Talk, "The Book of Mormon-Keystone of Our Religion", he references this verse and says that, "The scriptures are called "the words of life". What else could "the words of life" include? How do we "treasure up in your minds continually the words of life"? Are the "words of life" different from the "words of eternal life"? Does this relate to the polarity/dichotomy of sola scritura (the word) (see vs 57 commentary) juxtaposed with life (in the present worldly state) since we have just been counseled in verses 81-84 to take no thought for the morrow, live life in the now.

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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JS-H 1:26-30

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

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For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:31-35

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:36-40

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:41-45

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:46-50

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:51-55

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:56-60

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



                                                                 Return to top of page

JS-H 1:61-65

Home > The Pearl of Great Price > Joseph Smith-History


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Pearl of Great Price. The relationship of Joseph Smith-History to the Pearl of Great Price as a whole is discussed at The Pearl of Great Price.

Story. Joseph Smith-History consists of excerpts from Joseph Smith's history in three general groups:

  • JSH 1:55-75: Translation of the Book of Mormon and restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Joseph Smith-History include:

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand Joseph Smith-History. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

For a brief overview of Joseph Smith-History D&C 69 in historical relation to the Doctrine & Covenants and other events of the Restoration, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapters 1-3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapters 3-5.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:6: Opinions. The word "opinion/s" occurs also in 1 Kgs 18:21; Job 32:6, 10, 17; Alma 40:20; D&C 134:4, 7; JS-H 1:10. In each of these usages, the word seems to connote a sense of weakness relative to faithful decisions. This is perhaps best illustrated in 1 Kgs 18:21 where Elijah seems to rebuke the people for "halt[ing] . . . between two opinions." This might be related to the usage here, and in JS-H 1:10, where opinions are expressed in a way that lend themselves to being contestable and generating strife. The actual experience and subsequent testimony that Joseph Smith has and exhibits might be read as contrasting with "mere opinions" that other religious leaders are expressing. Although other usages of the word "opinion" seem to have a positive connotation as it relates to the restrictions of government power not infringing on the rights to opinions (e.g., D&C 134:4, 9]]), or as it is used to sign-post scriptural speculation (e.g., Alma 40:20), these usages can still be read as underscoring the limited nature of opinions.
  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. According to Webster's 1828 dictionary, the word "corrupt" referred primarily to something that was spoiled or tainted; less common meanings included being depraved, wicked, in error or not genuine. Since then, the word has more commonly come to refer to dishonesty as influenced by money or power, although today's meaning does not appear to have been the most common understanding of the word at the time this was written.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Professors. In verse 19, does "professors" refer to those who professed the Christian faith of the time, or to the instructors at the Christian colleges and/or seminaries of the time?
  • JS-H 1:49: "All that he had related to me the previous night." Why did the fourth visit occur at an opposite time (day) as the previous three (night)?
  • JS-H 1:60: "No sooner was it known that I had them." Did the community find out about the gold plates because Joseph needed a scribe?

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • JS-H 1:19: Corrupt. Why would the Lord call all Christian creeds an "abomination" (v. 19)?
  • JS-H 1:19: How should this understanding of Christian creeds influence our views of other churches and our interactions with other Christians?
  • JS-H 1:19: How do other churches have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof (v. 19)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of Joseph Smith-History is __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first published in __.
  • Joseph Smith-History was first canonized in the 1878 edition of the Pearl of Great Price.
  • Changes to the text of Joseph Smith-History:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Joseph Smith-History.

  • See D&C 2-18

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Institute Manual

  • Andrus, Hyrum L. Doctrinal Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1972. (ISBN 0877470685).
  • Clark, James R. The Story of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, 1973. (ISBN ____).
  • Doxey, Roy W. Walk with the Lord: Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1973. (ISBN 0877475024).
  • Draper, Richard D., S. Kent Brown, and Michael D. Rhodes. The Pearl of Great Price: A Verse by Verse Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 2005. (ISBN 9781590381878) (ISBN 1590381878) BX8629.P53D73 2005. - A recent and excellent verse by verse resource.
  • Elieson, Marc S. Principles of the Pearl of Great Price: A Topical Commentary. Lubbock, Texas: Enterprise Books, 2001. (ISBN 0970516606).
  • Johansen, Jerald R. A Commentary on the Pearl of Great Price: A Jewel Among the Scriptures, Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers & Distributors, Inc., 1985. (ISBN 0882902695).
  • Millet, Robert L. and Kent P. Jackson. Studies in Scripture, Vol. 2: The Pearl of Great Price. Salt Lake City, Utah: Randall Book Co., 1985. (ISBN 0934126747). - Long out of print and expensive on the used market, but has some good articles.
  • Nibley, Hugh W. Teachings of the Pearl of Great Price. Provo, Utah: FARMS. - Transcripts of lectures to an Honors Pearl of Great Price class at BYU, winter semester 1986.
  • Peterson, H. Donl. The Pearl of Great Price: A History and Commentary. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book Company, 1987. (ISBN 0875790968) (ISBN 0875796656) BX8629.P53P48 1987.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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