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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


2 Ne 2:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Second Nephi > Chapters 1-5 > Chapter 2 > Verses 2:11-15
Previous page: Verses 2:6-10                      Next page: Verses 2:16-30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Chapter 2. The relationship of Verses 2:11-15 to the rest of Chapter 2 is discussed at Chapter 2.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 2:11-15 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • 2 Ne 2:11-13: The import of Adam's fall. Verse 11 indicates that "life" was not possible without the opposing forces introduced in the fall; such things as righteousness and wickedness, good and bad, health and sickness, holiness and misery. Adam would not have ceased breathing if he'd not eaten of the forbidden fruit. In our usual sense of the word, he would have been alive, but in another sense, life is strictly required to involve change; either growth or decay. (health and sickness, life and death) Adam's state, as a closed system, was unchanging, as was Eve's. He could not progress and he could not decay.
In verse 12, if Adam could not die, then he could not truely live or progress, and since the earth was created for the express purpose of enabling man's progress, Adam's mortality (and, by extension, ours) was necessary in order to bring about the earth's purpose. Otherwise, all of creation would have been a thing of naught.
IN verse 13, such a state of things would belie an imperfection in the wisdom of God who had purposed the creation. (Likewise his inability to bring about his purpose would imply an imperfection in his power and by extension, many of his attributes.) Since God is, at least in part, defined as a being of perfect wisdom, then, if Adam had not fallen, then our God would not be a God and we would therefore have no God at all.
  • Adam, like Christ, was willing to die in order to bring forth much "fruit". Adam was not deceived, but knowingly and willingly partook of the fruit in order "that man may be".
  • 2 Ne 2:11. This verse has often been referred to as the most philosophically sophisticated passage in the Book of Mormon. It deserves very close scrutiny.
A basic problem divides the standard interpretations of this verse into two camps. At issue is the status of "wherefore, all things must needs be a compound in one." One camp takes this to be a restatement in new words of the opening sentence ("for it must needs be, that there is an opposition in all things"). In other words, one camp takes "all things must needs be a compound in one" to be a summary of the way things actually are (and, indeed, should be). The other camp, however, takes this to be the conclusion of the sentence that immediately precedes it ("if not so," etc.), the result being that it is itself restated in what follows it ("wherefore, if it should be one body," etc.). In other words, the other camp takes this to be a summary of the way things are not (and shouldn't be). It is best to solve this problem first and then to move on to interpretation of the verse more generally.
  • Structure. A number of clues suggest that there is a deliberate structure to Lehi's words in this verse:
  For it must needs be that there is an opposition in all things.
  
     If not so, [series of opposites: righteousness/wickedness, happiness/misery, good/bad], could not be brought to pass.
  
  Wherefore, all things must needs be a compound in one.
  
     If it should be one body, [series of opposites: life/death, corruption/incorruption, happiness/misery, sense/sensibility], must needs remain as dead.
Verse 11 thus appears to have a basic ABAB structure, with a deliberate parallel set up between "it must needs be that there is an opposition in all things" and "all things must needs be a compound in one" (with ties marked by italics and bolding above), and another deliberate parallel set up between the "if not so" and "if it should be one body" sentences (with ties again marked by italics and bolding).
This structure alone suggests that there is a kind of equivalence between "it must needs be that there is an opposition in all things" and "all things must needs be a compound in one." This structure, and its interpretive implication just noted, will guide all further interpretation of this verse.
  • It must needs be that. It is worth noting that Lehi says "it must needs be that there is" rather than "there must needs be." This appears a minor difference, but it seems to mark the gap between what philosophers call ontological or metaphysical necessity and logical necessity. Had Lehi said simply that "there must needs be an opposition in all things," he would seem to have been saying only that there is a logical necessity, a necessity about the way things appear, bound up with opposition. But because he said that "it must needs be that there is an opposition in all things," he seems rather to have been saying that there is an actually ontological necessity, a necessity about the way things are, bound up with opposition. The basic inconsistency ("opposition") Lehi identifies apparently runs right down into being, whether or not it appears in the world.
  • There is. It is worth noting also that Lehi says "it must needs be that there is an opposition in all things" rather than "it must needs be that an opposition is in all things." Again this appears a minor difference, but it marks the difference between topological localization and unlocalized universality.
  • An opposition. It is further worth noting that Lehi speaks of "an opposition" rather than "opposition" pure and simple. Lehi thus seems to have reference not to opposition as such, opposition in general, to the category of opposition, but rather to a particular opposition, a specifiable opposition, a singular opposition.
  • In all things. It is also worth noting that Lehi speaks of "an opposition in all things" rather than "an opposition for all things." Lehi highlights a kind of interiority rather than an exteriority with this one minor choice of word. It is not that there is some opposition that is brought to bear on things so much as an opposition that is at work within things, internal to them.
  • All things. Before any further interpretive work can be done, it is necessary to determine what Lehi means when he speaks of "all things." There are at least three distinct possible meanings.
  • Compound in one vs. one body. Although, at first blush, it may seem that "compound in one" and "one body" are very similar concepts (emphasizing oneness), it seems here they are being juxtaposed in a way that emphasizes the duality (or multiplicity) inherent in the term compound (cf. Alma 43:13 where compound refers to the Lamanites as an amalgamation of peoples). The idea of one body can be read here as a contrast to this oppositional nature of the word compound. The implication seems to be that if Adam's fall had not occurred, things would have remained in a state of unity. Interestingly, the word atonement also seems to presuppose a fusing together. (See also Gen 2:24 where man and woman are commanded to leave their parents and then to cleave to each other.)
  • 2 Ne 2:13. This verse tells us that if there is no sin there is no righteousness. This doesn't mean that in order to be righteous one must sin. Clearly, Christ's example shows us that this is false. We might read then this as saying that sin has to be known (someone has to sin) in order for there to be righteousness. Or maybe this means simply that sin has to be possible--man must be enticed (see verse 16). That reading would suggest that Christ had to be tempted in order for him to be righteous, but he didn't have to give in to temptation.
  • 2 Ne 2:14. Note that between verses 11 and verse 14, Lehi switches from addressing Jacob only to addressing his sons collectively.
  • 2 Ne 2:14. The first part of the verse answers the string of if-then statements in 13: Verse 13 says “if this, then not that,” etc. Verse 14 begins by saying “but that is true.” It follows that the first “this” in v. 13 isn’t true.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • 2 Ne 2:11: In the ancient Mediterranean Basin and Near East, many religions understood the world as a continuum: ultimately there is no difference between the lowest insect and the highest god; there is a unity of all-in-all, a state that could be described as “compound in one.” Some religions today hold similar beliefs. Perhaps Lehi has such religions in mind here. If so, why would he think it important to teach Jacob that they are false?
  • 2 Ne 2:11: If there must be opposition in all things for there to be good, why are those who oppose God’s law punished?
  • 2 Ne 2:11: What does “opposition” mean, “contrariety” or “difference"?
  • 2 Ne 2:11: One meanings of “opposition” is “contrast.” Could that be the meaning here? Does that change our understanding of the verse?
  • 2 Ne 2:11: Does it follow from what Lehi says here that there must be evil acts?
  • 2 Ne 2:11: What does it refer to in the phrase "if it should be one body"?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: Why would the world have been created for nothing, without purpose, if there were no opposition?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: Why would that “destroy the wisdom of God and his eternal purposes, and also the power, and the mercy, and the justice of God"?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: What is God's power, mercy and justice?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: Does Lehi mean this phrase to be understood as one thing, or does he mean us to understand each thing separately?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: What does “destroy” mean in this case?
  • 2 Ne 2:12: The phrase “no purpose in the end of its creation” is odd since “purpose” and “end” seem to mean the same thing in this case. What do you make of that odd phrasing?
  • 2 Ne 2:13: Look at each step in the chain of this argument. Can you explain why each step is true? For example, why is it that if there is no righteousness, then there is no happiness?
  • 2 Ne 2:13: To what does “these things” refer in the phrase “if these things are not there is no God,” to righteousness, happiness, punishment, and misery, or only to the last two?
  • 2 Ne 2:13: Variations of the phrase “to act and not to be acted upon” occur in several places in Lehi’s address (v. 14 and v. 26). If we are affected by something, we are acted upon, so if we have bodies or emotions, we are acted upon. Since Lehi doesn’t deny that we have bodies or emotions, he must mean something different. What does “acted upon” mean to him? What things act? What things are acted upon?
  • 2 Ne 2:13: In what sense are the forbidden fruit and the tree of life opposites?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • 2 Ne 2:13-14. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar says it is "ultimately impossible for another person to offend" us because it is "a choice we make [and] not a condition inflicted or imposed upon us. ... To believe that someone or something can make us feel offended, angry, hurt, or bitter diminishes our moral agency and transforms us into objects to be acted upon. As agents, however, you and I have the power to act and to choose how we will respond to an offensive or hurtful situation."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 2:6-10                      Next page: Verses 2:16-30

Mosiah 24:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Mosiah > Chapters 20-24 (Verses 20:1-24:25)
Previous page: Chapter 19                      Next page: Chapters 25-29


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Mosiah. The relationship of Chapters 20-24 to the rest of Mosiah is discussed at Mosiah.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 20-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 24: Implications for Baptismal Covenant and Relationship with God. The implications of these verses for our understanding of baptism and our relationship to God are profound. They suggest that when we are baptized, we enter into community with God and Christ. We become, in important ways, fellow citizens with the Father and Son of a divine community. This profound meaning is suggested by the explicit echoes in these verses of Mosiah 18:8-10 which describe the covenant we make when we are baptized. At baptism, we take upon ourselves the obligation “to bear one another’s burdens that they may be light … to mourn with those that mourn … and comfort those that stand in need of comfort, and to stand as a witness of God at all times and in all things, and in all places that [we] may be in, even until death” (Mosiah 18:8-10).
These verses in chapter 24 suggest that the Father and Son are bound to us by the same baptismal covenant that binds us to one another. When they act to serve us, it is as fellow members of the covenant community we enter when we are baptized. In other words, in these verses the Lord chooses to characterize himself not as a distant sovereign who exists high above us but as a fellow citizen of the divine community who labors with us to bear the burdens of those who struggle.
Thus, in Mosiah 24:13, the Lord says “I will covenant with my people.” Then in verses 13 and 14, he makes it clear that his covenant is the same one we have made. He will “visit [his] people in their afflictions” and bear their burdens that they may be “made light.” He will mourn with them as they mourn, comfort them as they stand in need of comfort. He will enable them to “stand as witness for [God]” as they have covenanted to do at the Waters of Mormon. He will undertake the same obligations as other members of the covenant community that was formed at the Waters of Mormon. In short, he suggests in these verses that he and we have like natures and like moral obligations and he ask nothing of us at baptism that he is not doing himself.
One very important implication of Christ joining us as a kind of equal in this covenant community is that our obligation to bear one another’s burdens that they may be light, to mourn with those that mourn and comfort those that stand in need of comfort extends not just to our fellow Church members but to Christ himself. We are obligated to mourn with him when he mourns and to comfort him when he stands in need of comfort. But how can we fulfill that obligation? D&C 18:11-13 and Luke 24:43 may answer this question.
D&C 18:15-16 (often cited to encourage missionary work) indicates that if we labor all our lives crying repentance and bring save it be one soul unto Christ, our joy with that one soul will be great in the kingdom of the father. Much less often cited are verses 11-13 which suggest that it is Christ who most profoundly experiences joy when a soul repents. Since it was he who paid the heavy price to enable the repentance of the soul that is saved, it would naturally be he who experiences the most joy when his suffering has the intended effect of saving a soul. Thus we can partly repay the debt we all owe the Savior by brining repentant souls to him, first our own, then those of others around us.
Of course, the moment when the Savior most stood in need of comfort was in Gethsemane. Luke reports that he pled with the father that the cup might pass from him and that an angel then appeared to strengthen and comfort him (Luke 24:42-43). We can be that angel. The only comfort the Savior could have received in that moment would be assurances that his sacrifice was not in vain, that the souls for whom he suffered would choose to receive the gift of salvation he there offered them. We can comfort the Savior to whom we owe everything by going to Gethsemane in imagination and spirit and there assuring him in his moment of agony that we gratefully receive his self-sacrifice, that with broken heart and contrite spirit we are born again in him, will repent of our sins and return to the father through the grace he there offers us.
Is this possible? Christ’s atonement was infinite. It was connected to every moment of time before or after in which a soul repents. As a divine being, the Savior was immersed in both time and eternity. So it may literally be true that knowledge of our acceptance of the offering might comfort him in that moment. But whether literal or not, both he and we can benefit if we take passage to Gethsemane and gratefully receive the redemption he offered us there.
See Alma 33:23 for a related echo of the baptismal covenant.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 23:14. Alma tells his people that they should trust no one to be their teacher or minister except that person be a man of God. Is this advice applicable to us today? How should we apply it? Is it applicable when we are learning about non-religous subjects? How about Gospel Doctrine and Relief Society/Priesthood teachers? Do we have a responsibility to evaluate whether our teachers in church are men or women of God--whether they walk in God's commandments?

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 20:13: Why were they so kind to the Lamanite king after what he had just done? What can we learn from this?
  • Mosiah 21:33: Why would Ammon consider himself unworthy to baptize?
  • Mosiah 21:34: What is meant in verse 34 by "form themselves into a church"? It seems there was religious instruction and worship going on given that verse 31 tells us that the people had entered into a covenant with God. So what is that they aren't doing such that they consider themselves not having formed a church?
  • Mosiah 24:1-5: Since the BoM was written for our day, in what ways is the educational system created here by apostate Amulon reflected in the educational system adopted by the Americans? Is the editor trying to warn us of something?
  • Mosiah 24:4: I am curious about verse 4. Are there other verses in the Book of Mormon that talk to the Language of the Nephites as not being the same as the Lamanites? I am curious about this topic but I wonder if there just isn't enough info in the Book of Mormon about it to make the topic fruitfull. If that is true, it wouldn't be too surprising given that purposeful effort to concentrate on the religious history by Nephi originally and also by Mormon as he put stuff together.
  • Mosiah 24:8: Was Alma the Younger one of Alma's children persecuted by the children of Amulon?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 23:9-10. Anthony D. Perkins, "‘The Great and Wonderful Love’," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 76–78. Elder Perkins said: "If you imagine that your prior sins, character flaws, and poor decisions prevent you from receiving all of God's blessings, consider the experience of Alma the Elder... Alma's repentance was so complete and Christ's Atonement so infinite that Alma became a prophet and was promised eternal life (see Mosiah 26:20). As you do your best to be obedient and repentant, you too can receive a place in the celestial kingdom through the Atonement and grace of Jesus Christ."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapter 19                      Next page: Chapters 25-29

Mosiah 24:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Mosiah > Chapters 20-24 (Verses 20:1-24:25)
Previous page: Chapter 19                      Next page: Chapters 25-29


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Mosiah. The relationship of Chapters 20-24 to the rest of Mosiah is discussed at Mosiah.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 20-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 24: Implications for Baptismal Covenant and Relationship with God. The implications of these verses for our understanding of baptism and our relationship to God are profound. They suggest that when we are baptized, we enter into community with God and Christ. We become, in important ways, fellow citizens with the Father and Son of a divine community. This profound meaning is suggested by the explicit echoes in these verses of Mosiah 18:8-10 which describe the covenant we make when we are baptized. At baptism, we take upon ourselves the obligation “to bear one another’s burdens that they may be light … to mourn with those that mourn … and comfort those that stand in need of comfort, and to stand as a witness of God at all times and in all things, and in all places that [we] may be in, even until death” (Mosiah 18:8-10).
These verses in chapter 24 suggest that the Father and Son are bound to us by the same baptismal covenant that binds us to one another. When they act to serve us, it is as fellow members of the covenant community we enter when we are baptized. In other words, in these verses the Lord chooses to characterize himself not as a distant sovereign who exists high above us but as a fellow citizen of the divine community who labors with us to bear the burdens of those who struggle.
Thus, in Mosiah 24:13, the Lord says “I will covenant with my people.” Then in verses 13 and 14, he makes it clear that his covenant is the same one we have made. He will “visit [his] people in their afflictions” and bear their burdens that they may be “made light.” He will mourn with them as they mourn, comfort them as they stand in need of comfort. He will enable them to “stand as witness for [God]” as they have covenanted to do at the Waters of Mormon. He will undertake the same obligations as other members of the covenant community that was formed at the Waters of Mormon. In short, he suggests in these verses that he and we have like natures and like moral obligations and he ask nothing of us at baptism that he is not doing himself.
One very important implication of Christ joining us as a kind of equal in this covenant community is that our obligation to bear one another’s burdens that they may be light, to mourn with those that mourn and comfort those that stand in need of comfort extends not just to our fellow Church members but to Christ himself. We are obligated to mourn with him when he mourns and to comfort him when he stands in need of comfort. But how can we fulfill that obligation? D&C 18:11-13 and Luke 24:43 may answer this question.
D&C 18:15-16 (often cited to encourage missionary work) indicates that if we labor all our lives crying repentance and bring save it be one soul unto Christ, our joy with that one soul will be great in the kingdom of the father. Much less often cited are verses 11-13 which suggest that it is Christ who most profoundly experiences joy when a soul repents. Since it was he who paid the heavy price to enable the repentance of the soul that is saved, it would naturally be he who experiences the most joy when his suffering has the intended effect of saving a soul. Thus we can partly repay the debt we all owe the Savior by brining repentant souls to him, first our own, then those of others around us.
Of course, the moment when the Savior most stood in need of comfort was in Gethsemane. Luke reports that he pled with the father that the cup might pass from him and that an angel then appeared to strengthen and comfort him (Luke 24:42-43). We can be that angel. The only comfort the Savior could have received in that moment would be assurances that his sacrifice was not in vain, that the souls for whom he suffered would choose to receive the gift of salvation he there offered them. We can comfort the Savior to whom we owe everything by going to Gethsemane in imagination and spirit and there assuring him in his moment of agony that we gratefully receive his self-sacrifice, that with broken heart and contrite spirit we are born again in him, will repent of our sins and return to the father through the grace he there offers us.
Is this possible? Christ’s atonement was infinite. It was connected to every moment of time before or after in which a soul repents. As a divine being, the Savior was immersed in both time and eternity. So it may literally be true that knowledge of our acceptance of the offering might comfort him in that moment. But whether literal or not, both he and we can benefit if we take passage to Gethsemane and gratefully receive the redemption he offered us there.
See Alma 33:23 for a related echo of the baptismal covenant.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 23:14. Alma tells his people that they should trust no one to be their teacher or minister except that person be a man of God. Is this advice applicable to us today? How should we apply it? Is it applicable when we are learning about non-religous subjects? How about Gospel Doctrine and Relief Society/Priesthood teachers? Do we have a responsibility to evaluate whether our teachers in church are men or women of God--whether they walk in God's commandments?

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 20:13: Why were they so kind to the Lamanite king after what he had just done? What can we learn from this?
  • Mosiah 21:33: Why would Ammon consider himself unworthy to baptize?
  • Mosiah 21:34: What is meant in verse 34 by "form themselves into a church"? It seems there was religious instruction and worship going on given that verse 31 tells us that the people had entered into a covenant with God. So what is that they aren't doing such that they consider themselves not having formed a church?
  • Mosiah 24:1-5: Since the BoM was written for our day, in what ways is the educational system created here by apostate Amulon reflected in the educational system adopted by the Americans? Is the editor trying to warn us of something?
  • Mosiah 24:4: I am curious about verse 4. Are there other verses in the Book of Mormon that talk to the Language of the Nephites as not being the same as the Lamanites? I am curious about this topic but I wonder if there just isn't enough info in the Book of Mormon about it to make the topic fruitfull. If that is true, it wouldn't be too surprising given that purposeful effort to concentrate on the religious history by Nephi originally and also by Mormon as he put stuff together.
  • Mosiah 24:8: Was Alma the Younger one of Alma's children persecuted by the children of Amulon?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Mosiah 23:9-10. Anthony D. Perkins, "‘The Great and Wonderful Love’," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 76–78. Elder Perkins said: "If you imagine that your prior sins, character flaws, and poor decisions prevent you from receiving all of God's blessings, consider the experience of Alma the Elder... Alma's repentance was so complete and Christ's Atonement so infinite that Alma became a prophet and was promised eternal life (see Mosiah 26:20). As you do your best to be obedient and repentant, you too can receive a place in the celestial kingdom through the Atonement and grace of Jesus Christ."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapter 19                      Next page: Chapters 25-29

Hel 12:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Helaman > Chapters 7-12
Previous page: Chapter 1-6                      Next page: Chapters 13-16


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Helaman. The relationship of Chapters 7-12 to the rest of Helaman is addressed at Helaman.

Story. Chapters 7-12 consists of ____ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Helaman 7-12 include:

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  • Hel 7:1-5. The apostate state of the Nephites was growing worse as time went on. The government was corrupt and it seems that there were fewer and fewer righteous individuals.
  • Hel 7:6-10. It's interesting that Nephi would want to live at another time in history. I suppose that we tend do that ourselves whenever the world seems to be in a bad state.
  • Hel 8:15. In other scriptures describing the typology of the brazen serpent, looking to Christ and being healed is described as simple (1 Ne 17:41) and easy (Alma 37:46). However, v. 15 qualifies the conditions of looking: faith and a contrite spirit are also required to obtain eternal life. This is consistent with other scriptures that teach that simply believing in God is not sufficient (see James 2:17-26). Still, because of the atonement, it is relatively easy for us to obtain eternal life. Although we might not always consider the requirement of nurturing faith and developing a contrite heart easy, we do not have to pay the price that Christ did (cf. D&C 19:16-19). Moreover, Prov 13:15 and Alma 41:10 teach us that the sinner's path is hard and unhappy, presumably much harder than having faith and a contrite heart.
  • Hel 8:16-20. Nephi defends the words of Christ by speaking of other prophets and how they were also called to speak his words.
  • Hel 8:21. It appears that Mulek and his followers left Jerusalem after it was destroyed, and thus became witnesses to the descendants of Lehi, who left before Jerusalem's destruction.
  • Hel 8:23. This sounds like the Second Comforter.
  • Hel 8:25. "Laying up treasures in heaven" must not refer to the idea of good works earning exaltation, but of earning blessings while in the heavenly kingdoms of glory.
  • Hel 8:26. The imagery "ripening for destruction" occurs several times in the Book of Mormon. Today we typically use the word ripe with positive connotations. It seems the same was true at the time the Book of Mormon was translated into English (see Webster's 1828 definition). In contrast to that, ripen is consistenly used negatively in the Book of Mormon and Doctrine and Covenants. Ripen there is consistently paired up with something negative (e.g. "in iniquity" or, as here, "for destruction")--see 1 Ne 17:43, Hel 5:2, Hel 6:40, Hel 8:26, Hel 11:37, Ether 2:9, Ether 9:20, D&C 18:6, D&C 61:31.
  • Hel 8:26. Anything that is allowed to ripen for too long will eventually spoil.
  • Hel 8:26. In verse six, Nephi states that the wicked people of Zarahemla are "ripening, because of [their] wickedness... for everlasting destruction; yea, and except [they] repent it will come unto [them] soon." As noted above in the lexical notes, ripening is used in the Book of Mormon consistently in relation to the bad--who, when ripe, will be destroyed. Similar imagery is used in relation to the good. In the allegory in Jacob 5 talks of good fruit which at the right time, God lays up. In both cases, the idea that a time is given to reach maturity--either fully wicked or fully good.
  • Hel 8:26. The point of Nephi saying that the people of Zarahemla are ripening for descruction is to 1) explain why God hasn't already punished the wicked--because he is waiting for them to fully show their wickedness (see Alma 14:11), and 2) to warn them. When the time is right, the ripe piece of fruit will get picked. Likewise, God's day of judgment and punishment will one day come to the wicked if they do not first repent.
  • Hel 9:2. It seems doubtful they would have believed when faced with the proof they sought. They didn't seem to have a sincere desire coupled with real intent. They seemed to be saying "I'll believe it when I see it," rather than "I'll see it when I believe it."
  • Hel 9:4. These five men "had not believed the words which Nephi had spoken concerning the chief judge." They had probably not even hoped that Nephi's words were true. Most likely they just wondered about the truthfulness of Nephi's words or wanted to use them against him.
  • Hel 9:5. These men apparently clung to their fear of man (Nephi) after Nephi helped the multitude to start fearing God rather than man in Hel 8:10-11.
  • Hel 9:5. The fact that "they did quake" seems to imply that they had fear.
  • Hel 9:8. In both verses 1 and 8, people who did not have the full truth were left on their own to figure things out according to what "they said among themselves." This insular approach may have prevented some groups from sharing their information with other groups.
  • Hel 9:8. It appears that "the multitude who had gathered together at the garden of Nephi" were not the same as or seen by "the people [who] did gather themselves together unto the place of the judgment-seat" (vs. 7). In other words, the former group heard Nephi prophesy of the murder, but it was the latter group who received "the servants [who] ran and told the people, raising the cry of murder among them" (vs. 6). Support for this distinction comes from the fact that Nephi's preaching "was upon a tower, which in the garden of Nephi, which by the highway which led to the chief market, which was in the city of Zarahemla" (Hel 7:10). So it seems that Nephi preached to the multitude on the outskirts of the city, away from the main body of the people. Moreover, the five who went to check on the murder could not have merely walked across the street. Instead, they "ran in their might, and came in unto the judgment-seat" (vs. 3).
  • Hel 9:20. Confederate = in league with (Webster's 1828). Given the fact that in this case the people are charging Nephi with being in league with a murder, we might interpret this as "You are an accomplice."
  • Hel 9:21. Uncircumcised hearts are mentioned five times in the King James Bible (Lev 26:41, Jer 9:26, Ezek 44:7, Ezek 44:9, Acts 7:51). In the Bible, uncircumcised hearts appear to refer to those who may be outwardly circumcised in the flesh, but have broken the covenant of circumcision. Circumcision, as a sign of the Abrahamic covenant, also became a sign of purity, giving the connotation that uncircumcised hearts are impure (cf. uncircumcised lips Ex 6:12).
  • Hel 11:4. Even though he had been rejected time and again, Nephi pleads to the Lord on behalf of these people (verse 4). This is a good example of charity that many missionaries can relate to and learn from since it is hard to maintain charitable thoughts when people reject and mock precious teachings.
  • Hel 12:1-5. Although it sounds like God is trying to curse us because of our wickedness for not keeping the commandments, there is also a point where God rebukes us with "divine curses." In Genesis 3:17 it points out that they are cursed for their sake, and also in Helaman 15:3 the people are chastened. That is usually caused by a trial of our faith or by allowing us to suffer.

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  • Hel 7:1-5: Why couldn't Nephi find any righteous people in the Land Northward?
  • Hel 7:1-5: What happened to all the Sons of Helaman and their families who had gone northward 20 years earlier? Why might they have fallen away, rather than remained as righteous as their parents?
  • Hel 7:1-5: While we often celebrate the Sons of Helaman for their war exploits, could we be missing the bigger story, that unlike their parents who were willing to be killed rather than kill others, the willingness of these warriors to join the war tradition of the Nephites led to their ultimate downfall and their children's loss of faith?
  • Hel 7:6-10: Where was Nephi while he was lamenting the wickedness of the people?
  • Hel 8:1-4: What is Nephi's crime that the judges are referring to in v. 1? Is Nephi's crime more than just speaking things the judges and/or people don't want to hear? What is the corruptness of the law referred to in v. 3? Why are the judges afraid to "lay their own hands" upon Nephi in verse 4?
  • Hel 8:15: What does it mean to "look upon the Son of God"?
  • Hel 8:22: Why does Nephi say that Lehi was "driven out of Jerusalem because he testified of these things"? Does this suggest the people were persecuting him because he spoke of Christ?
  • Hel 8:22: Which of the fathers didn't testify of Christ? They didn't write in scripture, did they?
  • Hel 8:24: Why is Nephi trying to catch them in a lie?
  • Hel 8:25: Does in heaven "where nothing doth corrupt" mean that there the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics won't be in effect?
  • Hel 8:26: Does "everlasting destruction" start in Spirit Prison with punishment for sins?
  • Hel 8:27: When Satan rewards people with damnation for committing murder through bloodshed, is he intending this to be some sort of twisted substitute for Christ's atonement and sacrifice?
  • Hel 8:28: In this life, is Satan not the sole author of sin?
  • Hel 8:28: If people are initially and basically good-natured, could the natural man be the receiver and seeker of temptations, and not the initial originator?
  • Hel 8:28: How evil did Gadianton become? Did he lose himself in the attempt to serve Satan?
  • Hel 9:1: Why didn't everybody else leave as well?
  • Hel 9:1: Did Nephi say more things?
  • Hel 9:3: Did all people have such easy access to the chambers of the chief judge?
  • Hel 9:3: Did they just run in, undeterred by any guards?
  • Hel 9:5: How much faith did they have when they saw this scene?
  • Hel 9:5: Would their faith endure or would their process of verification leave them lacking enough faith in the end?
  • Hel 9:5: Why did these men fall to the earth?
  • Hel 9:5: Did the power of God strike them?
  • Hel 9:5: Did they faint or try to play dead?
  • Hel 9:6: When did the chief judge start having servants?
  • Hel 9:6: What does the "cry of murder" sound like?
  • Hel 9:7: How many people were suspicious of the story that the chief judge had managed to knock five men unconscious while receiving a fatal stabbing?
  • Hel 9:8: Did the people automatically blame the five men and seemingly recognize God's hand in the apprehension because of their spiritual blindness, or were members of the secret band among the people trying to sell them on a lie, in order to protect the dead chief judge's brother?
  • Hel 9:9: Were these supposed murders going to receive a fair trial?
  • Hel 9:9: Why did these five wake so easily?
  • Hel 9:9: Had they been just unconscious, rather than in an unwakeable and deep sleep caused by a spiritual vision, similar to that of Alma the Younger?
  • Hel 9:9: Who sent the proclamation out?
  • Hel 9:9: Were there government agencies at the time besides the office of the chief judge?
  • Hel 9:9: Did the lower judges draft and distribute the proclamation?
  • Hel 9:10: Were they similar in their wickedness to Seezoram?
  • Hel 9:10: Did they fear that a new secret band was in town?
  • Hel 9:10: Was it a carryover of old tradition?
  • Hel 9:10: From who were they seeking an answer in finding a new chief judge?
  • Hel 9:11: Were these judges supporting Nephi or showing support for Seezoram by attending his funeral?
  • Hel 9:11: Was this even a funeral or just a burial?
  • Hel 9:14-15: The five that were questioned, what seems to be their thoughts on the events and what Nephi prophesied?
  • Hel 9:21: What does it mean to be "uncircumcised of heart"?
  • Hel 9:38: Weren't these five already given liberty? (See 9:18.) How do we make sense of these two verses together?
  • Hel 10:9: What does the Lord mean when he says to have faith to move mountains? Is this a literal or figurative expression?
  • Hel 10:16: Nephi is "conveyed" away from a dangerous crowd. What does this mean? Did he just disappear or was he delivered out of the situation?
  • Hel 11:6-10: Why might a famine humble the people more than a bloody war?
  • Hel 11:23: What does it mean to have "many revelations daily"? How much revelation should we be seeking and expecting?
  • Hel 12:3: God of peace. Several scriptures refer to God as a "God of peace" (Rom 15:23, Rom 16:20, 1 Cor 14:33, 2 Cor 13:11, Philip 4:9, 2 Thes 3:16). Perhaps because of this, many believers often say that God does not cause human suffering, but only allows it. However, the phraseology in v.3 of God visiting his people with death and terror suggests a rather direct involvement on God's part. Does this mean then that God not only allows human suffering but causes it? If not, how else can these verses be understood?
  • Hel 12:4: Was the author of this verse urging us to be quick to do good? Can the quickness or slowness of our actions be equated with the rapidity of our response? Is there any danger of acting righteously in an instinctual way, rather than in a deliberative way?
  • Hel 12:20-21: Verse 20 explains what happens when the Lord says to someone that they will be accursed forever. Verse 21 explains what happens when the Lord says to someone that they will be cut off from his presence. Is this the same thing repeated twice or is there a difference in the meaning of the two? If there is a difference what is it?

Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 50:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 50 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

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  • D&C 50:2-4. A little over one year after the church was established it was already having problems with false spirits (v. 2). Verse 4 makes it clear that the Lord wasn't happy with some of the saints.
  • D&C 50:6-9. Verse 7 tells us that those whose choices have given the adversary power, but whose actions are the result of having been deceived, will be reclaimed. If we apply this promise widely to those led in whatever wrong direction because they were deceived, it provides some comfort. In contrast the hypocrites will be cut off. The difference between the two groups seems to depend on whether one is a deceiver or a deceived. Of course, applying the scripture to ourselves, the significant point is to avoid falling in either group as indicated in verse 9.
  • D&C 50:1-9. If we read verses 1-9 as connected to the next verses, then it could be read that there were hypocrites who came, deceived, and thereby weakened some Saints (v 7). Because of their weakened state, these Saints were more likely to receive spirits which they could not understand (v 15-16).
  • D&C 50:24: Brighter until the perfect day. A natural reading of this verse suggests a contrast between growing brightness and the perfect day. That is, "he that receiveth light" will continue to grow brighter "until the perfect day" seems to imply that the growing in light stops at some point. This does not necessarily contradict the notion that one will continue to increase in glory via some sense of "eternal increase" (cf. D&C 131:4), but it does suggest there may be some sort of achievable level of attained light where one is then considered perfect or whole or complete.
  • D&C 50:26-27. Verses 26-27 are similar to D&C 46:27 "unto such as God shall appoint and ordain to watch over the church and to be elders unto the church, are to have it given unto them to discern all those gifts lest there shall be any among you professing and yet be not of God."
  • D&C 50:30. Verse 30's language of a "head" is similar to D&C 46:29 "That unto some it may be given to have all those gifts, that there may be a head"

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  • D&C 50:14. The business of "receiving" in this section has a lot to be worked out. In verse 14, the Lord talks about their ordination to go teach, but verse 15 talks about them receiving, not teaching. Verse 19's usage of "receiving" seems to mean those being taught. So why, in verse 15, does the Lord talk about someone who is called to teach as receiving?

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  • Robert D. Hales, "To Act for Ourselves: The Gift and Blessings of Agency," Ensign, May 2006, pp. 4–8. "Agency is strengthened by our faith and obedience. Agency leads us to act: to seek that we may find, to ask that we may receive guidance from the Spirit, to knock on that door that leads to spiritual light and ultimately salvation. I bear special witness that our Savior Jesus Christ is the source of that light, even the Light and Life of the World. As we use our agency to follow Him, His light will grow within us 'brighter and brighter until that perfect day' when we are welcomed into the presence of our Father in Heaven for all eternity."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 58:1-5

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For a brief overview of D&C 58 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

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  • D&C 58:6-9. In verse 6 the Lord says that the purpose for them (those gathered in Jackson County Missouri) to be sent (we assume that what is meant here is sent to Jackson County Missouri) is so that they can be obedient and be prepared to bear testimony of things which are to come. From this, we might ask, "what are they to bear testimony of?" or in other words, "what is to come?"
At first we might interpret verse 8 as an answer to this question. There the Lord prophecies that there will be a feast of the fat thing for the poor. Then in verse 9 the Lord explains that this is to be "a supper of the house of the Lord . . . unto which all nations shall be invited." But verse 11 tells us that this feast is not the end in itself that we should be looking forward to. This feast is prepared "for the great day." We interpret this great day to be the second coming. In other words, the Saints are to testify of the fact that the second coming is on its way.
If we think of this feast in contrast to the famine that Amos prophecies about in Amos 8:11, then just as that was a famine for the words of the Lord, we can interpret this as a feast upon the words of the Lord.
Verse 9 tells us that "all nations shall be invited." But verses 10 & 11 tell us that not everyone is to be invited at that the same time. First the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble are invited. Then the poor.
Compare this with Luke 14:12-14. There the Lord tells the lawyers and Pharisees that when they throw a feast they ought not to invite the rich. Rather they should invite the poor, maimed and blind.
Compare also Luke 14:16-24. In that parable of a feast, the poor, the maimed, the halt and the blind are also invited after the guests of priviledge. And there it specifically tells us that those that were invited first, made excuses and did not come to the feast.
One could ask why it it is that the day the Lord invites the poor is what he calls the day of his power. Why not choose the day he first invites the rich as the day of his power? One possible answer is that the Lord may be implying that just like in the parable in Luke 14:16-24, the people he invites first reject the invitation. The day of the Lord's power would be identified then as the day when the Lord has triumphed.
  • D&C 58:8: Feast of fat things. This phrase also occurs in Isa 25:6. Interestingly, the modifying phrase "might be prepared for the poor" does not occur there. This modifying phrase might be read as a check against reading Isaiah as supporting, say, unchecked capitalist consumerism.

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  • D&C 58:2. What is meant here by keeping the commandments "in death"? Does it mean something like accepting the gospel when you are dead? Or is it refers to someone who keeps the commandments and pays for this with their own life?
  • D&C 58:10. Why are the rich, learned, wise and noble invited first? Is the Lord saying that this is who he invites first? Or, is he saying that this is who we should invite first? --Is this meant to be prescriptive? In other words, if we apply this scripture to today, if we are missionaries opening up a new city, should we teach first the rich, the learned, the wise and the noble before we go to teach the poor?

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Verse 8[edit]

  • "Feast of fat things." See this post by Rosalynde at the T&S blog for thoughts on Christmas, consumerism and (extreme) Puritanism, as it relates to the phrase "feast of fat things."

Verses 26-27[edit]

  • M. Russell Ballard, "O Be Wise," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 17–20. Elder Ballard encourages members of the church to be innovative in their callings. "Because the eternal principle of agency gives us the freedom to choose and think for ourselves, we should become increasingly able to solve problems. We may make the occasional mistake, but as long as we are following gospel principles and guidelines, we can learn from those mistakes and become more understanding of others and more effective in serving them."

Verse 42[edit]

"Choose to believe in the Atonement of Jesus Christ. Accept the Savior's forgiveness, and then forgive yourself. Because of His sacrifice for you, He has the power to 'remember [your sins] no more.' You must do likewise."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 95:1-5

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 95:1. In what ways does the Lord chasten his people?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 95 is __.
  • D&C 95 was first published in __.
  • D&C 95 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 95:

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 95:13-17: Symbolism in temple architecture. Cowan, Richard O. "Latter-day Saint Temples as Symbols)." In Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture, 21/1 (2012): p. 2-11. Provo, Utah: BYU University: Neil A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 93                         Next section: D&C 96

D&C 101:1-5

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:11-15

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:21-25

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 101:61-65

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:71-75

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:76-80

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 101:81-85

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:86-90

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:91-95

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:96-101

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:1-5

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:6-10

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:11-15

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:16-20

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This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:21-25

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:26-30

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:31-35

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Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 103:36-40

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When we think of the redemption of Zion, we should not be lost on the fact that redemption has a double meaning that refers also to the redeeming power of the Savior. We are “set to be a light unto the world”(9) hints at our divine potential. Through sin and disobedience, our divine inheritance is “scattered”(11) and lost and become open to the buffetings of Satan(8). We must repent through our own efforts. We are redeemed through the power of God (15). We receive the blessing of redemption (13). Eternal life and complete redemption will come “in time”(20) which is why we must endure to the end.

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 103 is __.
  • D&C 103 was first published in __.
  • D&C 103 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 103:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 103.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:1-5

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:6-10

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:11-15

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:16-20

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:21-25

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:26-30

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:31-35

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This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 105:36-41

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 105
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 104
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 106

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 105:5. What are "the principles of the law of the celestial kingdom" required for the building up of Zion?
  • D&C 105:5. We often think of Zion as being established during the Millenium, when the world will be "renewed and receive its paradasiacal glory" of a terrestrial kingdom. Does this verse imply that the Saints must live a celestial law in order to transform the rest of the world into a terrestrial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the difference between a terrestrial law and "the law of the celestial kingdom"? Is this the Law of Consecration, which has to be entered into before entering the celestial kingdom?
  • D&C 105:5. What is the connection between "the law of the celestial kingdom" and the ordinances and covenants of the temple?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 105 is __.
  • D&C 105 was first published in __.
  • D&C 105 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 105:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 105.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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