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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


Eph 2:16-22

Home > The New Testament > Ephesians


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Summary[edit]

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Historical setting[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Eph 1:17: Revelation. The Greek word translated as "revelation," apokalupsis, carries with it the idea of uncovering something, exposing something, or making something known that was previously unknown. In the New Testament, it almost always refers to divine revelation.
  • Eph 2:8. In the Joseph Smith Translation, a single word is added in verse 8, apparently to emphasize the contrast: but it is the gift of God.
  • Eph 2:8: Grace. The Greek word here for "grace" (charis, which is etymologically related to the English word "charity") may not have had the theological overtones at the time Paul wrote this as it does today. Charis comes from the verb chairo, which means "to be happy" or "to rejoice," so in its original sense charis means "that which causes joy or pleasure." In a broader sense, it can be understood to mean "lovingkindness," "loving favor," "good will" and things along that line — the kind of love that flows out of a person and whose expression makes that person happy. In other words, to oversimplify a bit, Paul's use of this word indicates that it is God's freely given love for us that saves us.
  • Eph 2:10. Paul in verse 10 puts what precedes into context. The purpose of the atonement and the salvation it brings is that we may do the good works that God assigned to us even before we were born. Some commentators over the years have contrasted this section of Ephesians with James 2:17, but in fact they complement each other. If the whole purpose of our creation is to do good, of what value is the salvation we receive through faith if it doesn't result in doing good?
  • Eph 4:26-27. It is interesting to note that Paul does not condemn anger per se. What is key, he suggests, is not allowing the anger to lead us to sin, for to do so would make room (verse 27) for the devil to be active in our lives. The temptation is to let our anger lead us to do evil. The alternative, Paul says in the following verses, is to actively do good. Instead of stealing, we should give to the needy (verse 28); we should speak in a way that builds people up instead of tearing them down (verse 29); and instead of being malicious to others (verse 31), we should be kind and forgiving in the way that God is kind and forgiving toward us (verse 32).

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Points to ponder[edit]

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  • Eph 5:22. In what way(s) do wives need to submit themselves unto their husbands? What cultural influences prevailed at the time these scriptures were written? Are the statements Paul makes regarding the role of women license to silence them, either literally or figuratively?

Resources[edit]

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Translations[edit]

These are still pointed at Matthew

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in Ephesians. This list is complete:[1]

  • Eph 2:8, 11
  • Eph 3:1-3, 18
  • Eph 4:4, 10, 13, 21-23, 28
  • Eph 5:17

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

  • Eph 4:14. L. Tom Perry, "The Plan of Salvation," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 69–72. Elder Perry encourages members to seek grounding in the gospel. "Let us be no more tossed to and fro by every worldly wind and doctrine of man. We declare to the world that the heavens are open and the truth of God’s eternal plan has again been made known to mankind. We live in the dispensation of the fulness of times... We are not left alone to wander through mortality without knowing of the master plan which the Lord has designed for His children. He has bound Himself by solemn covenant to give us the blessings of heaven according to our obedience... Oh, remember, remember that these things are true, for the Lord God has revealed these eternal truths unto us."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 280-81.


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Hel 6:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Helaman > Chapters 1-6
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Summary[edit]

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Relationship to Helaman. The relationship of Chapters 1-6 to the rest of Helaman is addressed at Helaman.

Story. Chapters 1-6 consists of ____ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Helaman 1-6 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Hel 1:1-3. Verse 1 tells us that at the beginning of the 40th year of the reign of the judges there began to be a serious difficulty among the people. Verses 2-3 explain that this difficulty was that Pahoran, the chief judge, had died, and 3 of his sons were contending for, or struggling to become, the chief judge.
  • Hel 1:6-10: Paanchi. Paanchi was the brother of Pahoran yet he still planned to rebell against his brother when he was not elected to be the cheif governing body over the People of Nephi. Why was his greed so great that he would rebell. Why was his crime so great that he was put to death. How would Pahoran feel about these things that took place. Why is the liberty of the people so important?
Re: the question, why was Paanchi's crime so great that he was put to death? Verse 8 gives two reasons for his sentence to death. I take these reasons not as separate reasons but two ways to describe the same thing. 1) Paanchi had risen up in rebellion and 2) Paanchi had tried to destroy the liberty of the people.
I think these are two ways of saying the same thing because Paanchi, by rebelling against what was dictated by the voice of the people, was going against the source of the people's liberty. I think that fact that he was trying to lead the people to this serious type of rebellion, against the state, was the reason that he was punished with death. I think that answers your question. I could be missing something in the question though. Anyway, in my mind I think it pretty common in a culture with capital punishment that treason, or rebellion against the state, would be grounds for death.
  • Hel 1:18-33. These verses tell us how the Lamanites were able to overrun the city of Zarahemla despite the fortifications the Nephites had made. Two main reasons are given for the Lamanites' success: 1) because of contention in the land of Zarahemla (v 18), and 2) because the Nephites had concentrated on defending the surrounding cities, assuming this to be where the Lamanites would attack (v 26).
  • Hel 2:3. Hel. 1:9-12 relates how Kishkumen murdered Pahoran and made a pact with his band to keep it a secret.
  • Hel 2:3: Chief judgeship line. Here Helaman is appointed as the new chief judge. This is interesting because Helaman is a descendant of Alma, the original chief judge. However, the chief judgeship didn't pass directly from Alma to Helaman in an unbroken line. Alma, overburdened with his duties both as Chief Judge and High Priest, delegated the chief judgeship to Nephihah (Alma 4:16-18)).
  • Hel 2:14. Where did "the book of Nephi" end?
  • Hel 3:29.This verse is telling us that if we will hold onto the word of God (which is the scriptures, Christ, or the Gospel of Christ), we will not be fooled by Satan and we will be led through misery and trials to arrive at God's right hand.
  • Hel 3:35: Sanctify. To sanctify means to make holy. We could understand the phrase "even to the ... sanctification of their hearts" (verse 35) to mean "even to making of their hearts holy."
  • Hel 3:35. Verse 35 seems to describe how we can become sanctified by humbling ourself in frequent fasting and prayer. The sacrifice of food and water associated with fasting apparently helps us change our spiritual, emotional, and physical nature--giving us a softened heart and willingness to submit to the will of the Lord.
  • Hel 3:35: Fasting. Fasting is mentioned 39 times in the Old Testament (list here and here), eight times in the New Testament (list here) and 20 times in the Book of Mormon (list here). The Book of Mormon seems to fit the Old Testament pattern of more frequent fasting mentions. However, the Book of Mormon gives us a more complete view of fasting as a method for sanctifying our hearts and obtaining knowledge (see again Alma 17:3,9) than we get from the bible. In contrast to the Old Testament view of fasting as infrequent or ceremonial (as in the annual fast on the Day of Atonement), we also see from the Book of Mormon that fasting was a regular and frequent practice when the people were righteous.
  • Hel 3:35. When we yield ourselves unto God, we are humbling ourselves and submitting ourselves to his will, whatever that may be. In order to yield ourselves unto God, we must not be prideful.
  • Verse 5 begins the thematic of angelic visitation that pervades this chapter. Although many references point explicitly to the Savior's visit to the Americas in 3 Nephi 8-18, many also point to Nephite historical accounts of angelic encounters. We will deal first with the historical experiences, and second with the anticipation of Christ's visit to the Nephites.
  • Parallels with other Nephite prophets who saw angels
  • v. 4 ~ Nephi yields up the judgment seat in favor of preaching the gospel, similar to Alma (Alma 4:18-19), whose angel experience is recorded in Alma 36:6
  • v. 6 ~ Helaman tells his sons that they are named for Lehi and Nephi who came out of Jerusalem, both of whom conversed with angels (1 Ne 1:5-15, 11:14)
  • v. 10 ~ Amulek's words are recounted; Amulek's angel = Alma 10:7
  • v. 10 ~ Zeezrom; no explicity mention of an angelic encounter for Zeezrom, but he seems to have an experience similar to Alma's--bedridden and miserable until repentance occurs and his sins are forgiven (Alma 15:3-12). Is it possible that he also similarly experiences an angel or messenger sent from God? Perhaps Alma acts as that messenger?
  • Events and Details that parallel Nephite historical angel encounters
  • "A pillar of fire" (Hel 5:24,44)--the only other time that a pillar of fire is mentioned in the Book of the Mormon is in the first chapter, with Lehi. This phraseology could descend from Exodus, but it also points explicitly to Lehi's vision of the heavens and the throne of God, including "numberless concourses of angels" (1 Ne 1:8)
  • "The earth shook" (Hel 5:27,31,33)--this is similar to the shaking of the earth that accompanies Alma's angel experience
  • How does this connect with the jail-escape stories in Acts?
  • Another jail-escape: Alma and Amulek leaving Ammonihah (which is specifically referenced in Hel 5:10!), as recounted in Alma 14:23-29
  • "The faces...did shine exceedingly" (Hel 5:36)--Abindadi was sent as a messenger from God, paralleling Nephi and Lehi sent as angels? Also points to Moses? (Mosiah 13:5)
  • "Encircled about," "in the midst of" (Hel 5:44)--reminiscent of Lehi's vision of the angels encircling God's throne; the image of a circle, and eternal round, etc.
  • Alma: "encircled about by the bands of death" (Alma 5:7), "encircled about with the matchless bounty of his love" (Alma 26:25), "encircled them in the arms of safety" (Alma 34:16)
  • Unspeakable Tongues--"marvelous words which cannot be uttered by man" (Hel 5:33), "they could speak forth marvelous words" (Hel 5:45)--speaking with the tonges of angels? Points back to 2 Nephi 32:3
  • Specific mention of the word "angel"
  • "The faces of Nephi and Lehi...did shine exceedingly, even as the faces of angels" (Hel 5:36)
  • "They do converse with the angels of God" (Hel 5:39)
  • "Angels came down out of heaven and ministered unto them" (Hel 5:48).
It seems likely that Nephi and Lehi are being rendered as angels--their names, explicit references to other men who've encountered angels, their roles as messengers of God, and their apparently easy conversance with the heavens.
Even more explicit than the past historical encounters, however, is the anticipation of Christ's visitation.
  • "Shake the whole earth as if it was about to divide asunder" (3 Ne 8:6), "quakings of the earth" (3 Ne 8:19)
  • "The earth shook," (Hel 5:27), "the earth shook exceedingly" (Hel 5:31), "the earth shook again" (Hel 5:32), "the earth shook as if it were about to divide asunder" (Hel 5:33)
  • "There was darkness upon the face of the land" (3 Ne 8:19), "there was thick darkness upon all the face of the land" (3 Ne 8:20), "the darkness was dispersed" (3 Ne 10:9)
  • "They were overshadowed with a cloud of darkness, and an awfuul solemn fear came upon them" (Hel 5:28), "the cloud of darkness...did not disperse" (Hel 5:31), "cloud of darkness" and "fear" (Hel 5:34), "the cloud of darkness shall be removed from overshadowing you" (Hel 5:41), "the cloud of darkness was dispersed" (Hel 5:43)
  • "A voice heard" (3 Ne 9:1), "there came a voice" (3 Ne 10:3), "a voice as if it came out of heaven" (3 Ne 11:3), "they heard the voice and they understood it not" (3 Ne 11:4), "again the third time they did hear the voice" (3 Ne 11:5)
  • "There came a voice as if it were above the cloud of darkness" (Hel 5:29), "the third time the voice came" (Hel 5:33)
  • "It was not a harsh voice, neither was it a loud voice; nevertheless, and notwithstanding it being a small voice it did pierce them that did hear to the center, insomuch that there was no part of their frame that it did not cause to quake; yea, it did pierce them to the very soul, and did cause their hearts to burn" (3 Ne 11:3)
  • "It was not a voice of thunder, neither was it a voice of a great tumultuous noise, but behold, it was a still voice of perfect mildness, as if it had been a whisper, and it did pierce even to the very soul" (Hel 5:30)
  • "Except they shall repent" (3 Ne 9:2), "that the blood of the prophets and the saints shall not come any more unto me" (3 Ne 9:5-11), "repent of your sins" (3 Ne 9:13), "the Father commandeth all men, everwhere, to repent and believe in me" (3 Ne 11:32), "ye must repent" (3 Ne 11:37, 38)
  • "Repent ye, repent ye, and seek no more to destroy my servants" (Hel 5:29), "you must repent" (Hel 5:41)
  • "Him will I baptize with fire and with the Holy Ghost" (3 Ne 9:20), "I will baptize you with fire and with the Holy Ghost" (3 Ne 12:1), "they shall be visited with fire and with the Holy GHost, and shall receive a remission of their sins" (3 Ne 12:2), "they shall be filled with the Holy Ghost" (3 Ne 12:6)
  • "The Holy Spirit of God did come down from heaven and did enter into their hearts, and they were filled as if with fire" (Hel 5:45)
  • "Round about him, and Jesus stood in the midst" (3 Ne 17:12), "Jesus stood in the midst" (3 Ne 17:13), "midst of fire" (3 Ne 17:24), "encircled about with fire" (3 Ne 17:24)
  • "Encircled about, as if by fire" (Hel 5:23), "standing in the midst of fire" (Hel 5:23), "they were encircled about" (Hel 5:44), "as if in the mdist of a flaming fire" (Hel 5:44)
  • "They saw the heavens open, and they saw angels descending" (3 Ne 17:24), "angels did minister unto them" (3 Ne 17:24)
  • "They did lift their eyes to heaven...as if talking or lifting their voices to some being whome they beheld" (Hel 5:36), "they do converse with the angels of God" (Hel 5:39), "they saw the heavens open; and angels came down out of heaven and ministered unto them" (Hel 5:48)
  • "Cannot be written" (3 Ne 17:15), "No tongue can speak" (3 Ne 17:17)
  • "Marvelous words which cannot be uttered by man" (Hel 5:33)
  • Verse 5:12. To build upon the rock of our Redeemer means to have a strong foundation of beliefs, or in other words, faith. We must build faith in the Lord Jesus Christ our everlasting savior, and if we do so we will not be swayed by the tempest of temptation and lies that the great deceiver, even Lucifer, will place in our our path.
This oft-cited passage uses imagery of "rock" and "foundation" similar to that used in the wise man/foolish man parable to illustrate an important distinction made frequently in scripture, the distinction between reliance on the Lord and reliance on other powers. Reliance on the Lord provides a sure foundation, "on which man cannot fall," whereas faith on any other power leaves one ultimately unprotected from Satan's "shafts in the whirlwind." It also suggests the principle that faith for faith's sake is insufficient, but faith must be directed toward something with real power to deliver the hoped for promises--in this, and all other cases, Christ.
Different from the wise man/foolish man parable, this scripture does not compare against building upon some other type of foundation (e.g., sand) in order to make its point. Instead it posits the storm itself as the adversary--the purposefully antagonistic force against which we must protect ourselves--not some indiscriminate wind as described in the parable. This more direct approach is consistent with the generally plain and direct tone of the Book of Mormon set by its first author, Nephi, whose soul "delighteth in plainness" (2 Ne 31:3).
Still, the parallel imagery to the New Testament parable may offer insight into the nature of revelation. As the Lord is the ultimate source of Helaman's teaching in this verse, and of course is the direct speaker in the New Testament parable, use of similar imagery could lend support to an argument that his actual personality can be found even when his teaching comes indirectly through prophets.
  • Hel 5:17-19. Nephi and Lehi were given power unto them that they might speak. This Power is the power of speaking with the influence of the Holy Ghost.
  • Hel 5:23-25 The Israelites were protected from the Egyptians by a pillar of fire in their flight from Egypt, and here we see a pillar of fire that protects Nephi and Lehi so that the people dare not lay hands upon them.
  • Hel 5:41-50: Faith and evidence. Verses 41-47, 50 show an interesting interaction between faith and evidence. It is interesting that the people are given such strong evidences. The scriptures sometimes make it clear that some people who reject prophets, if they were shown more mighty miracles they would still reject the truth. It is interesting that things work differently. Here people who originally reject the prophets are converted.
  • Hel 6:11-15. During this time of prosperity the Nephite-Lamanite conflict seems to come to an end, racially speaking. The adversary then seems to begin using the terrorism/robbing of the Gadianton Robbers to destroy the people of God. From the description that we receive of this people we can deduce that they were an active and hardworking civilization. This could be contrasted to idleness that the Gadianton Robbers seemed to prefer.
  • Hel 6:16-20. The wealthy at this time seem to become desensitized to the value of human life. Their focus rests upon their possessions and the pursuit of obtaining more.
  • Hel 6:25. We are reminded that the Jaredites had experienced the same problem with secret societies and that the knowledge of such was to be kept hidden so that history wouldn't repeat itself.
  • Hel 6:31-35. The Spirit of the Lord leaves us when we abandon the Lord and his teachings. The Nephites wilfully rebelled against the Lord and worshiped idols instead.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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  • Hel 6:31-15. Can we in this day make idols of our possessions like the Nephites did?

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Hel 1:9. Why did those who supported Paanchi send Kishkumen to kill Pahoran?
  • Hel 1:16-20: Who was Coriantumr? What position did he hold with the Lamanites?
  • Hel 1:21-25: How was Coriantomrs march through the Land of Nephi equally of great destruction to the Nephites, yet Giving the Nephites a great advantage over the armies of Coriantomr?
  • Hel 1:26-30: Why were the strongest of the Nephite armies around the borders of the land?
  • Hel 1:31-34: How did Moronihah take possession of the Land of Zarahemla from the power of the Lamanites?
  • Hel 3:5: Are we to understand that there had been timber in the desolate lands before the "many inhabitants" used it all up?
  • Hel 3:12: What was the fate of the People of Ammon who went to the land northward? Did they remain faithful in the land northward(see Verse 7:3)?
  • Hel 3:33: Verse 33 seems to draw a distinction between pride entering into the church of God and pride entering into the hearts of the people who profess to belong to the church of God. What is the significance of this distinction? Is it possible for pride to enter into the church of God?
  • Hel 3:35: What does it mean to "fast oft"? Does fasting once a month constitute fasting "oft"?
  • Hel 3:35: How does fasting and praying increase our humility and faith?
  • Hel 3:35: How does humility and faith fill our souls with joy and consolation?
  • Hel 3:35: How does humility and faith lead to the purification and sanctification of our hearts?
  • Hel 3:35: What is the relationship between fasting and sanctification?
  • Hel 3:35: What does it mean to yield our hearts unto God?
  • Hel 4:11-15: Pride. Pride is a recurring downfall in the Book of Mormon. People are always destroyed, spiritually and temporally because of pride. How can we learn to overcome pride and not be destroyed spiritually and temporally like the people in the Book of Mormon?
  • Hel 4:12: The verse says destruction came upon the Nephites "because of the pride of their hearts, because of their exceeding riches." Is this saying that riches cause pride? Is it possible to have riches and not be prideful? If so, how can one who has riches be sure he or she is not becoming prideful? (Cf. Jacob 2:19.)
  • Chapter 5: Why all the angel references? Is this the only "angel" text in the Book of Mormon? Why is it placed here? Does it show a longing for the outpouring of miracles in the past, similar to what members of the church feel today? Did Mormon make these connections as he abridged the text, or was it in Helaman/Nephi/whoever's orginal record, and Mormon luckily managed to keep the important details?
  • Hel 5:9: Kin Benjamin's words. Why does Helaman remind his sons of the words of King Benjamin?
  • Hel 5:10: Christ is redeeming us from our sins not in our sins because if we are being redeemed in our sins and we continue to commit them, we have not grown (compare Zeezrom's questioning of Amulek on this in Alma 11:34ff). The idea of coming to earth and using the atonement is that overcoming our sins will refine us and make us better so that we may become more like Heavenly Father.
  • Hel 5:11: How are we redeemed "from" our sins? Does this mean that we are redeemed "from" our sins because the sin has already been comitted? We can't take back anything that has been done in the past. All we can do is repent and be saved by Christ from the mistakes that we have previously made.
  • Hel 5:17: What does it mean when it says in verse 17, "they were baptized unto repentance?" Do they literally get baptized every time they repent or are they just made clean in their hearts and the eyes of God?
  • Hel 5:23: Fire. Is the use of the word fire in this verse literal or figurative? The passage says that the Lamanites were afraid they would get burned, but it also says, "as if by fire", so did it just look like fire or was it literally fire protecting Nephi and Lehi? If the passage means literal fire, is there additional symbolic significance (e.g. does this have any reference to the term, "baptism by fire")?
  • Hel 5:32: What does it mean in this context to say that the kingdom of heaven is at hand?
  • Hel 5:48: Mormon tells us that angels ministered unto those in the prison. What does minister mean in this context?
  • Hel 5:49-51: How should we understand the relationship between the miracles done to the Lamanites and their conversion? Were they converted because of miracles? Why were so many of the Lamanites at this time "convinced ... because of the greatness of the evidences" when others with similar miracles are not?
  • Hel 6:7-9: Here the Nephites and Lamanites were at peace, traded goods freely, and became rich. Was becoming rich a result of being at peace? Of trading goods freely?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Hel 3:8: If one assumes that covering the "face of the whole earth, from the sea south to the sea north" means that this population covered the entire American continents then this verse would seem to imply that the Nephite population multiplied unimaginably quickly. For a comprehensive analysis of population growth in the Book of Mormon see James E Smith's Nephi's Descendants? Historical Demography and the Book of Mormon (FARMS Review: Volume - 6, Issue - 1, Pages: 255-96).
  • Hel 3:29: Across that everlasting gulf. Jacob at the New Cool Thang blog argues that this is analogous to 1 Ne 12:18 and that depictions of Lehi's dream should have tree of life separated from the path leading to it by a gulf (based on this verse and other passages). The crossing of this gulf then is analogous to the crossing of the Red Sea during the exodus and is symbolic of baptism.
  • Hel 3:31-37: Fasting. A good non-LDS review of instances of fasting in the Old Testament is here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Helaman                      Next page: Chapters 7-12

Moro 6:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Moroni > Chapters 1-6
Previous page: Moroni                      Next page: Chapter 7


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Moroni. The relationship of Chapters 2-6 to the rest of Moroni is addressed at Moroni.

Story.

  • Chapter 1: Moroni's circumstances Chapters 1 consists of a short update on Moroni's circumstances after completing the book of Ether.
  • Chapters 2-6: Church practices. Chapters 2-6 consists of six sections in three pairs that cover a series of closely related church administrative practices with great spiritual significance.
  • Chapters 2-3: Conferring the gift of the Holy Ghost (2:1-3) and ordaining to the priesthood (3:1-4).
  • Chapters 4-5: Prayers to bless the sacrament bread (4:1-3) and sacrament wine (5:1-2).
  • Chapter 6a-6b: Baptism (6:1-4) and church shepherding (6:5-9).

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapter 2-6 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Moro 1: Moroni's circumstances[edit]

  • Moro 1: Moroni's circumstances. Chapter 1 introduces the book of Moroni. Chapter 1 is distinct from the instruction regarding church practices in Chapters 2-6, but but there is not sufficient content on this wiki about Chapter 1 to justify a separate wiki page.

Moro 2-6: Moroni's priesthood manual[edit]

  • Moro 2-6: Priesthood Manual. Moroni's specification in chapters 2-6 of priesthood ordinance and church administrative practices is sometimes called "Moroni's Priesthood Manual" or "Moroni's Handbook of Instruction."
  • Moro 2-6: Influence of teachings from Christ's ministry. Much of Moroni's language here in chapters 2-6 is borrowed from the account of Christ's teaching in Third Nephi. For example:
This evidences the great influence that Christ's teachings during his ministry to the Nephites continued to have on the Nephite church 400 years alter. This concept is developed in Welch, John W. "Worthy of Another Look: Reusages of the Words of Christ," p. 69-70.
Both the account of Christ's teaching in Third Nephi and the teachings here in Chapters 2-6 figured prominently in the development of D&C 20, the "Articles and Covenants" or "Constitution" of the Church. This concept is developed in Elieson, Kurt. Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, Vol. 1, p. 370-73.

Moro 2-3: Ordination and gift of the Holy Ghost[edit]

Moro 4-5: Sacrament prayers[edit]

  • Moro 4-5: Difference in the wording of the two sacrament prayers. The change in wording from the prayer on the bread to the prayer on the water communicates a profound message about the atonement: it is the Savior who empowers us to do the good we would, but can’t. The prayer on the bread says that we “are willing” to always remember the Savior. The prayer on the water says that we “do” always remember him. Why this change from “willing” to “do”? What does it signify?
One answer is that the change in the sacrament prayers signifies a critically important transition from acting alone to acting in Christ, with the corresponding increase in our capacity for righteousness. Before we bond ourselves to the Savior through broken-hearted contrition, we may have the will but do not have the self -discipline and strength of character to do what we should. After we symbolically make Christ part of us by partaking of the bread, his flesh, “the enabling power of the Atonement” (Bednar) becomes active in our lives, and we have the power to do that which we were willing but unable to do on our own--“always remember him, and keep his commandments which he has given [us]” (Moroni 4:3). Thus, the key difference between the prayer on the bread and the prayer on the water is that Christ is not part of us during the first prayer but is during the second because we have now partaken of his flesh.
So the prayer on the bread is about willing, the prayer on the water about doing. And yet, the prayer on the water says only, we “do always remember him,” not that we “do keep his commandments which he has given [us].” Why is there no statement about keeping the commandments in the second prayer? The answer is that such a statement would be redundant. Those who fully and continually remember Christ are born again. They “have no more disposition to do evil, but to do good continually” (Mos. 5:2). It follows that they "do keep his commandments which he has given them.” Of course, ability to always remember him is itself a gift of grace, as the prayers indicate. We bring to Christ a willing heart. He produces in us a broken-hearted and contrite remembrance of his sacrifice on our behalf, a remembrance that empowers us to keep his commandments and, thus, sanctifies us.
Partaking of the sacrament is a symbolic, not a magical act. So there is no suggestion in this analysis that there is an actual transition from will to act that occurs after one eats the bread but before one drinks the water. The suggestion is that the sacrament prayers and the partaking of the bread and water quite precisely and beautifully signify the process by which the atonement sanctifies a willing soul.
  • See User: Joe Spencer/Lordly for a poetic exploration of the act of kneeling with the whole Church in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper.

Moro 6: Baptism and shepherding[edit]

  • Moro 6:4: Finisher of our faith. This term also appears in Heb 12:2. The term translated in the NT as finisher is the Greek noun teleiotes ("perfector") which comes from the Greek verb teleioo (to make perfect or complete, to accomplish or carry through completely, to add what is lacking to make something full).

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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  • Who should administer the Sacrament?
  • What is the covenant made by taking the Sacrament?
  • What does the Bread represent?
  • What does the Wine represent?

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moro 1:4. Why was Moroni unsure whether his words would be of worth to the Lamanites?
  • Moro 2:2. We learn here that when Christ calls his disciples by the laying on of hands, he tells them that before they give Holy Ghost to others they should "call on the Father in [his] name, in might prayer." Why is this step such an important prerequisite that it merits Christ saying this to each of the twelve individually? Does this same prerequisite exist today before a Melchizedek priesthood calls on someone to receive the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands?
  • Moro 3:2. What is the role of prayer in preparing to officiate in an ordinance involving the priesthood?
  • Moro 6:3. Is serving the Lord to the end different from enduring to the end?
  • Moro 6:3. In practice what does it mean to require those getting baptized to have a determination to serve the Lord to the end? Is this still a precondition of baptism? If so, how does the Church today judge whether this condition has been met?
  • Moro 6:4. What does it mean to be "wrought upon" by the power of the Holy Ghost?
  • Moro 6:4. How is Christ the "finisher" of our faith?
  • Moro 6:5. At church we seem to talk a lot about concepts and programs, how much do we really talk about the "welfare" of our souls?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Moro 2-6: Influence of teachings from Christ's ministry. Welch, John W. "Worthy of Another Look: Reusages of the Words of Christ." In Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture, 22/1 (2013): p. 70. Provo, Utah: BYU University: Neil A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. This article discusses Christ's reuse of portions of the Sermon on the Mount, quoted in 3 Nephi 12-14, including here Moroni 2-6.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Moroni                      Next page: Chapter 7

D&C 18:11-15

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Summary[edit]

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  • D&C 18 is directed at first to Oliver Cowdery, then jointly to Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer, and also to the Twelve who will be selected.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: June 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 16
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 17

Oliver Cowdery began serving as Joseph Smith's scribe for the Book of Mormon translation on April 7, 1829. About the end of May, Joseph and Oliver left Harmony because of rising persecution to stay with the Whitmer family at Fayette, arriving probably not earlier than June 3. On June 14 Oliver Cowdery wrote a letter from Fayette to ____ at Manchester-Palmyra in which he quoted portions of D&C 18. The Book of Mormon translation was then completed about the end of June.

Little is known about the circumstances under which D&C 18 was received except that it was received at Fayette during June 3-14 while the Book of Mormon translation was progressing rapidly at the Whitmer home.

For a brief overview of D&C 18 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 18 can be outlined as follows:

• to Oliver (1-8)
• to Oliver & David: worth of souls is great, so preach (9-25)
• Twelve will be sought out (26-30)
• duties of the Twelve (31-36)
• Three Witnesses will select the Twelve (37-40)
• to Oliver & David: worth of souls is great, so preach (41-45)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 18:20: What does it mean to "Contend against no church," in verse 20?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 18 is ______.
  • D&C 18:10-14, 21-25 is paraphrased in a letter from Oliver Cowdery to Hyrum Smith dated 14 June 1829, so it is likely that the content of at least those verses is soon known to many of the Saints at Manchester-Palmyra.[1]
  • D&C 18 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 18.

  • D&C 18 and D&C 19 can be read as a pair in which D&C 18 to two of the Three Witnesses emphasizes the joy available through mercy, while D&C 19 to the other Witness emphasizes the dread of justice. In addition, D&C 18:10-18 provides the clearest statement of why missionaries preach, and D&C 18:21-22, 41-45 provides the most detailed instruction so far regarding what they are to preach: repentance, baptism and endurance to the end. D&C 19:21-22, 30-31 likewise instructs Martin Harris, the other of the Three Witnesses, to preach only faith, repentance, and baptism by water and the Holy Ghost, to not preach new doctrines, and to not contend.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Letter from Oliver Cowdery to Hyrum Smith (14 Jun 1829). Reprinted in Cook, Lyndon W. The Revelations of Joseph Smith, 29. Provo, Utah: Seventy's Mission Bookstore, 1981.

Previous section: D&C 15-16                         Next section: D&C 17

D&C 18:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 18
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 18 is directed at first to Oliver Cowdery, then jointly to Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer, and also to the Twelve who will be selected.

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: June 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 16
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 17

Oliver Cowdery began serving as Joseph Smith's scribe for the Book of Mormon translation on April 7, 1829. About the end of May, Joseph and Oliver left Harmony because of rising persecution to stay with the Whitmer family at Fayette, arriving probably not earlier than June 3. On June 14 Oliver Cowdery wrote a letter from Fayette to ____ at Manchester-Palmyra in which he quoted portions of D&C 18. The Book of Mormon translation was then completed about the end of June.

Little is known about the circumstances under which D&C 18 was received except that it was received at Fayette during June 3-14 while the Book of Mormon translation was progressing rapidly at the Whitmer home.

For a brief overview of D&C 18 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 18 can be outlined as follows:

• to Oliver (1-8)
• to Oliver & David: worth of souls is great, so preach (9-25)
• Twelve will be sought out (26-30)
• duties of the Twelve (31-36)
• Three Witnesses will select the Twelve (37-40)
• to Oliver & David: worth of souls is great, so preach (41-45)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 18:20: What does it mean to "Contend against no church," in verse 20?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 18 is ______.
  • D&C 18:10-14, 21-25 is paraphrased in a letter from Oliver Cowdery to Hyrum Smith dated 14 June 1829, so it is likely that the content of at least those verses is soon known to many of the Saints at Manchester-Palmyra.[1]
  • D&C 18 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 18.

  • D&C 18 and D&C 19 can be read as a pair in which D&C 18 to two of the Three Witnesses emphasizes the joy available through mercy, while D&C 19 to the other Witness emphasizes the dread of justice. In addition, D&C 18:10-18 provides the clearest statement of why missionaries preach, and D&C 18:21-22, 41-45 provides the most detailed instruction so far regarding what they are to preach: repentance, baptism and endurance to the end. D&C 19:21-22, 30-31 likewise instructs Martin Harris, the other of the Three Witnesses, to preach only faith, repentance, and baptism by water and the Holy Ghost, to not preach new doctrines, and to not contend.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Letter from Oliver Cowdery to Hyrum Smith (14 Jun 1829). Reprinted in Cook, Lyndon W. The Revelations of Joseph Smith, 29. Provo, Utah: Seventy's Mission Bookstore, 1981.

Previous section: D&C 15-16                         Next section: D&C 17

D&C 42:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 42 > Verses 42:1-10
Previous page: Section 42                      Next page: Verses 42:11-17


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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 42. The relationship of Verses 42:1-10 to the rest of Section 42 is discussed at D&C 42.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 42:1-10 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 42:1: Name. The word name occurs 6 times in this section, twice in verse 1 and once in verses 3, 6, and 44.
  • D&C 42:1: Commandment. The word "commandment" occurs 7 times in the first 69 verses (which was received as one revelation): in verses 1, 3, 4, 5, 29, 32, and 58. It also occurs in verse 78. The plural form, commandments, occurs in verses 1, 29, 32 and 78 whereas the singular form, commandment occurs in verses 3, 4, 5, and 58.
  • D&C 42:3: Unity. Unity is an important requirement for Zion (See the discussion of Zion at Moses 7:18). Here the elders receive the law that will govern in modern Zion because they are united. Other passages in the Doctrine & Covenants more clearly indicate that this unity may be simply a unified desire to receive an an answer and need not be unity as to what that answer will turn out to be. Examples: ____.
  • D&C 42:4: Forth. The word "forth" occurs 7 times in this section (and all within the first 69 verses, which was received as one revelation). The first six times are in the phrase "go forth" in verses 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 11, and the seventh occurrence is in the phrase "sent forth" in verse 63.
  • D&C 42:6: Preach. The word preach occurs twice in this section, once here and once in verse 11.
  • D&C 42:9: New Jerusalem. The phrase "New Jerusalem" occurs 4 times in this section in verses 9, 35, 62 and 67.
  • D&C 42:9: Gathered in one. This phrase occurs twice in this section—here in verse 9 and again in verse 36. The word gathered does not occur again in this section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 42:9. Does verse 9 imply that the missionary effort will end when the gathering to the New Jerusalem begins?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 42                      Next page: Verses 42:11-17

D&C 60:1-5

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 59
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 61
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 60 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 8 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 9.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 60 is __.
  • D&C 60 was first published in __.
  • D&C 60 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 60:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 60.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 59                         Next section: D&C 61

D&C 88:81-85

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 87
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 89

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3: My friends. The Lord calls those he addresses here my friends. This use of friends is similar to how it is used in John 15:14-15 where the Lord distinguishes his servants from his friends. See also D&C 84:63.
  • D&C 88:15: Soul. Though "soul" is defined here as the unity of the spirit and body, it isn't always or even often used that way in other scriptures. This definition is one which seems to have been saved for the latter-days. Therefore, when you read the word "soul" in scripture, you must ask yourself whether the writer meant "spirit" or "soul" as it is used here.
  • D&C 88:15. This is an important doctrine, for traditional Christianity has often denigrated the body, and because of that denigration our culture still often looks on the body as a hindrance (or, in backlash, it thinks of the body as the only thing). The privilege and acclaim we sometimes give supposedly intellectual professions over more physical professions is one of the remnants of this misunderstanding of the body and the spirit.
  • D&C 88:22: Abide. "Abide" means "wait for," "be prepared for," "endure," or "sustain."
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 speaks of those who remain, after those who receive a celestial, terrestrial and telestial glory have received it. The end of the verse tells us that these are they who are not willing to enjoy that which they might have received. It seems that what they might have received is one of the kingdom's of glory, or in other words, salvation (as the term is used in D&C 76:43). In D&C 76 (in verses 32 and 43) these people who do not receive salvation are referred to as the sons of perdition.
  • D&C 88:47. D&C 88 begins with a discussion of how Christ became "in and through all things" including the sun, moon, and stars because of his ascending above and descending below all things during the atonement. Here in verse 47, we are told that when we see the movement of the sun, moon or stars, we see God. We might ask about the promise to see God, is this all it means?--that we can see the sun, moon or stars? For most people, seeing the sun, moon, or stars is not the same as seeing God, just as verse 48 reminds us that when Jesus came to the earth, many people did not comprehend him--they just saw a carpenter from Nazareth, because they did not understand what they saw. Likewise, if we just see the sun, moon, or stars, we might miss seeing God if we don't understand how He is connected to them through the creation and the atonement. D&C 88 seems to challenge us to look beyond the mere physics of heavenly objects to seek out God. Especially in light of vv. 11-12, one might also see in this a merciful invitation to begin to see God (i.e., through phenomenon derived from his grace but not requiring translation/calling and election made sure, etc. that we might normally associate with the privilege of viewing God). See D&C 18:36 for a similarly "right in front of your face" way to hear His voice.

D&C 88:69-84: What the elders who attend the school of the prophets are to do[edit]

D&C 88:85-116: Signs of the times[edit]

D&C 88:117-126: Kirtland Temple[edit]

D&C 88:127-141: Order of the School of the Prophets[edit]

  • D&C 88:127-141: Later receipt. Verses 127-141 were received two weeks later than the rest of D&C 88.

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  • D&C 88:3. The verse ends "as is recorded in the testimony of John." Is this a reference to John 14:16?
  • D&C 88:4. How is the comforter the promise of eternal life?
  • D&C 88:15. What are some of the ways that we forget that the spirit and the body are one?
  • D&C 88:17. Why is it significant in the context of the redemption of the soul to note that Jesus promised the earth to the poor and meek? Why do these two things belong together?
  • D&C 88:21-22. We sometimes speak of being sanctified through obedience to law, but verse 21 speaks of being sanctified through the law. Is that any different? If so, how so? If not, why not?
  • D&C 88:21-22. Why do you suppose the Lord speak of abiding a law rather than obeying a law?
  • D&C 88:31. How does the phrase "receive of the same, even a fulness" square with D&C 76:86 where seems to say that those of a telestial glory "receive not of his fulness in the eternal world"? Is "fulness" referring to different things in these two passages? Or are these talking about two different periods of time? Or is something else going on?
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 tells us that the sons of perdition (see exegesis) enjoy that which they are willing to receive. Since the sons of perdition have openly rejected Christ, what is there left to receive?
  • D&C 88:35: A law unto itself. What does this phrase mean? Is it related to Rom 2:14 where the Gentiles are said to be a "law unto themselves" (but in a seemingly positive context there, in contrast to the seemingly negative context here)?
  • D&C 88:67-68. Verse 67 contains promises for those whose "eye be single to [the Lord's] glory", while verse 68 states contains a promise for those who sanctify themselves that "[their] minds become single to God." What is the relationship between the eye and the mind in these verses? Could eye and mind be used interchangeably in these verses?
  • D&C 88:69. What is the "great and last promise" we are to remember? Is it the promise found in verse 68?
  • D&C 88:78. What is the law of the gospel? Is it some specific law, or set of laws (e.g. the law of Moses)? or does it mean something general like "all the commandments"? (Maybe D&C 74:4 would be of help? There law of Moses and gospel of Christ are setup in contrast.)
  • D&C 88:114. Is this a metaphorical battle, like the one in the pre-mortal existence? Do Satan's armies only consist of the 1/3 of the hosts of heaven that are his spirit beings followers, or will people fall from glory and join Satan and his ranks?

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  • D&C 88:22. Larry W. Gibbons, "Wherefore, Settle This in Your Hearts," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 102–4. Elder Gibbons states: "Commandments are not given to burden or restrict us. Rather, they are guideposts from an all-wise Heavenly Father to keep us out of trouble, to bring us a fulness of happiness in this life, and to bring us safely back home to Him... Brothers and sisters, keeping the commandments makes all the difference in this life and in the next. To be worthy of the celestial kingdom and the joy that is there, we must keep the commandments!"
  • D&C 88:33. A. Roger Merrill, "Receiving by the Spirit," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 92-94. Elder Merrill ponders: "One cannot help but wonder how many gifts and blessings surround us that we do not receive."

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D&C 112:1-5

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D&C 112:6-10

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D&C 112:11-15

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D&C 112:16-20

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D&C 112:21-25

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D&C 112:26-30

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D&C 112:31-34

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This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 112 is __.
  • D&C 112 was first published in __.
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Doctrinal references cited on this page.

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 123:11-17

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Sections 121-123 > Verses 123:1-17
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Summary[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 123:12. Jeffrey R. Holland, "Prophets in the Land Again," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 104–7. Elder Holland said: "As surely as the rescue of those in need was the general conference theme of October 1856, so too is it the theme of this conference and last conference and the one to come next spring. It may not be blizzards and frozen-earth burials that we face this conference, but the needy are still out there—the poor and the weary, the discouraged and downhearted... They are all out there with feeble knees, hands that hang down, and bad weather setting in (see D&C 81:5)."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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