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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


D&C 20:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 20:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 20:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 20:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 20:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 20:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 20 > Verses 20:38-67
Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 20. The relationship of Verses 20:38-67 to the rest of Section 20 is discussed at D&C 20.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 20:38-67 include:

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:47. Here a distinction is drawn between vocal prayer and prayer in secret. The distinction, when set against a rather broad survey of the scriptures, seems to be quite fruitful: vocal prayer seems generally to be a question of communal prayer, and hence, of praise; while secret prayer seems generally to be a question of intercessory prayer, and hence, of petition (and most usually, complaint). If this is the distinction being made here, then the constant exhortation of the visiting priest is to praise together as a family in prayer and to counsel with the Lord on an individual basis. Maintaining this distinction perhaps would lead a more genuine verbal relationship with the Lord: together God's people praise, but individually they counsel with God. That these questions are understood here as a question of the family is clear: "and attend to all family duties" does not separate itself from the two exhortations to prayer, since this last phrase picks up on the infinitive "to" of "to pray vocally." In other words, this distinction in prayer is one that is supposed to be present in one's family life, in the family specifically. (For a similar pairing in the context of missionary service, see D&C 84:61.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 20:38: Verse 38 seems to have a rather limited scope as regards the priesthood. But the fact is that the priesthood was a series of offices, rather than two priesthoods and the several quorums, in 1830. That the Church seems at first to have been founded on the offices of the elder, priest, and teacher seems to reflect the organization of the churches in the Book of Mormon. What is the significance of the Book of Mormon's sway on the earliest organization of the Latter-day Church?
  • D&C 20:47, 53: What is the difference between the priest's duty in what is now called home teaching and the teacher's duty (compare verses 47 and 53)?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 20:17-37                      Next page: Verses 20:68-84

D&C 41:6-12

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 41
Previous section: D&C 40                         Next section: D&C 42


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 40
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 42

For a brief overview of D&C 41 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 41 is __.
  • D&C 41 was first published in __.
  • D&C 41 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 41.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 40                         Next section: D&C 42

D&C 84:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:31-42
Previous page: Verses 84:1-30                      Next page: Verses 84:43-59


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:31-52 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:31-42 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. Like other covenants contained in the scriptures, the priesthood covenant described in these verses creates a specific relationship between God and his children. By entering into this covenant, promises are exchanged and obligations created. These promises and obligations in turn establish a relationship of reliance between the parties. The priesthood holder relies upon God for the spirit (verse 33) and, eventually, for exaltation (verse 38). God relies on the priesthood holder to help establish his church and kingdom (verse 34). This reliance draws them together in a mutual effort.
The oath portion of the "oath and covenant" apears to be coupled with the covenant and thus probably relates to the same promises as the covenant. An oath can be distinguished from a covenant in that, traditionally, the performance of an oath is not contingent upon the performance by another person (as is the case in a covenant relationship). This perhaps suggests that the promises in these verses are also to be made by oath--i.e., regardless of what others may say or do, or not do.
Generally, the priesthood covenant is understood to be a covenant involving only priesthood holders. However, verses 35-38 repeatedly use the term "receive," which could certainly be read more broadly to be applicable to anyone who "receives" the Lord's priesthood in the same sense as receiving the Lord's servants (i.e., by accepting its/their teachings and authority).
  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. While we often talk about the oath and covenant of the priesthood as if it were a legally binding contract, with promises offered on both sides, perhaps it is more appropriate to think of it as entering into a higher relationship with the Lord. We are indeed promised blessings, including "all that my Father hath," making us sons and heirs. While baptism makes us children of Christ by our taking upon us his name, perhaps we should see receipt of the priesthood is our entering into heirship. This relationship involves our working with the Lord to fulfill his purposes on this earth. Rather than seeing priesthood as primarily the authority do act in God's name, perhaps we should view it more as a working relationship with the Lord, with authority given us to conduct the ordinances and other activities needed to further that relationship.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33. Is acceptance of the priesthood necessary for sanctification?
  • D&C 84:35. What distinction, if any, exists between obtaining the priesthood (v. 33) and receiving the priesthood?
  • D&C 84:39. The material in the foregoing verses are said to "accord" with the "oath and covenant" in an apparent reference without clear referent. Is it possible that Moses 7:51 is what is here in question? What would that mean for this most important passage (meaning verses 33-42)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:38. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon declares: "While the priesthood is given to worthy sons of God, His daughters are also a part of His people to whom He reveals His priesthood ordinances. And the promised blessing of 'all that [the] Father hath' is available to both men and women who exercise faith in Jesus Christ, receive the ordinances, and endure in faith to the end."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 84:1-30                      Next page: Verses 84:43-59

D&C 84:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:31-42
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:31-52 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:31-42 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. Like other covenants contained in the scriptures, the priesthood covenant described in these verses creates a specific relationship between God and his children. By entering into this covenant, promises are exchanged and obligations created. These promises and obligations in turn establish a relationship of reliance between the parties. The priesthood holder relies upon God for the spirit (verse 33) and, eventually, for exaltation (verse 38). God relies on the priesthood holder to help establish his church and kingdom (verse 34). This reliance draws them together in a mutual effort.
The oath portion of the "oath and covenant" apears to be coupled with the covenant and thus probably relates to the same promises as the covenant. An oath can be distinguished from a covenant in that, traditionally, the performance of an oath is not contingent upon the performance by another person (as is the case in a covenant relationship). This perhaps suggests that the promises in these verses are also to be made by oath--i.e., regardless of what others may say or do, or not do.
Generally, the priesthood covenant is understood to be a covenant involving only priesthood holders. However, verses 35-38 repeatedly use the term "receive," which could certainly be read more broadly to be applicable to anyone who "receives" the Lord's priesthood in the same sense as receiving the Lord's servants (i.e., by accepting its/their teachings and authority).
  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. While we often talk about the oath and covenant of the priesthood as if it were a legally binding contract, with promises offered on both sides, perhaps it is more appropriate to think of it as entering into a higher relationship with the Lord. We are indeed promised blessings, including "all that my Father hath," making us sons and heirs. While baptism makes us children of Christ by our taking upon us his name, perhaps we should see receipt of the priesthood is our entering into heirship. This relationship involves our working with the Lord to fulfill his purposes on this earth. Rather than seeing priesthood as primarily the authority do act in God's name, perhaps we should view it more as a working relationship with the Lord, with authority given us to conduct the ordinances and other activities needed to further that relationship.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33. Is acceptance of the priesthood necessary for sanctification?
  • D&C 84:35. What distinction, if any, exists between obtaining the priesthood (v. 33) and receiving the priesthood?
  • D&C 84:39. The material in the foregoing verses are said to "accord" with the "oath and covenant" in an apparent reference without clear referent. Is it possible that Moses 7:51 is what is here in question? What would that mean for this most important passage (meaning verses 33-42)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:38. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon declares: "While the priesthood is given to worthy sons of God, His daughters are also a part of His people to whom He reveals His priesthood ordinances. And the promised blessing of 'all that [the] Father hath' is available to both men and women who exercise faith in Jesus Christ, receive the ordinances, and endure in faith to the end."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 84:1-30                      Next page: Verses 84:43-59

D&C 84:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 84 > Verses 84:31-42
Previous page: Verses 84:1-30                      Next page: Verses 84:43-59


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 84 The relationship of Verses 84:31-52 to the rest of Section 84 is discussed at D&C 84.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 84:31-42 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. Like other covenants contained in the scriptures, the priesthood covenant described in these verses creates a specific relationship between God and his children. By entering into this covenant, promises are exchanged and obligations created. These promises and obligations in turn establish a relationship of reliance between the parties. The priesthood holder relies upon God for the spirit (verse 33) and, eventually, for exaltation (verse 38). God relies on the priesthood holder to help establish his church and kingdom (verse 34). This reliance draws them together in a mutual effort.
The oath portion of the "oath and covenant" apears to be coupled with the covenant and thus probably relates to the same promises as the covenant. An oath can be distinguished from a covenant in that, traditionally, the performance of an oath is not contingent upon the performance by another person (as is the case in a covenant relationship). This perhaps suggests that the promises in these verses are also to be made by oath--i.e., regardless of what others may say or do, or not do.
Generally, the priesthood covenant is understood to be a covenant involving only priesthood holders. However, verses 35-38 repeatedly use the term "receive," which could certainly be read more broadly to be applicable to anyone who "receives" the Lord's priesthood in the same sense as receiving the Lord's servants (i.e., by accepting its/their teachings and authority).
  • D&C 84:33-42: The oath and covenant of the Priesthood. While we often talk about the oath and covenant of the priesthood as if it were a legally binding contract, with promises offered on both sides, perhaps it is more appropriate to think of it as entering into a higher relationship with the Lord. We are indeed promised blessings, including "all that my Father hath," making us sons and heirs. While baptism makes us children of Christ by our taking upon us his name, perhaps we should see receipt of the priesthood is our entering into heirship. This relationship involves our working with the Lord to fulfill his purposes on this earth. Rather than seeing priesthood as primarily the authority do act in God's name, perhaps we should view it more as a working relationship with the Lord, with authority given us to conduct the ordinances and other activities needed to further that relationship.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:33. Is acceptance of the priesthood necessary for sanctification?
  • D&C 84:35. What distinction, if any, exists between obtaining the priesthood (v. 33) and receiving the priesthood?
  • D&C 84:39. The material in the foregoing verses are said to "accord" with the "oath and covenant" in an apparent reference without clear referent. Is it possible that Moses 7:51 is what is here in question? What would that mean for this most important passage (meaning verses 33-42)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 84:38. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon declares: "While the priesthood is given to worthy sons of God, His daughters are also a part of His people to whom He reveals His priesthood ordinances. And the promised blessing of 'all that [the] Father hath' is available to both men and women who exercise faith in Jesus Christ, receive the ordinances, and endure in faith to the end."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 84:1-30                      Next page: Verses 84:43-59

D&C 90:1-5

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Previous section: D&C 89                         Next section: D&C 91


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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 89
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 91

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 90 is __.
  • D&C 90 was first published in 1835.
  • D&C 90 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 1835 edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 90:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 89                         Next section: D&C 91

D&C 90:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 90
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 89
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 91

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 90 is __.
  • D&C 90 was first published in 1835.
  • D&C 90 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 1835 edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 90:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 90.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 89                         Next section: D&C 91

D&C 102:1-5

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 101
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 103

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 102 is __.
  • D&C 102 was first published in __.
  • D&C 102 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 102:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 102.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • See this post by Nathan Oman at the T&S blog for discussion of the original minutes of a meeting from which this section is taken. The focus is on the transition from charisma to bureaucracy.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 101                         Next section: D&C 103

D&C 107:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:1-20
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:1-20 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:1-20 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1: Melchizedek. The historical twists and turns surrounding the usage of the name Melchizedek in pre-1835 Mormonism are rather complex. It did not appear at all in the 1833 Book of Commandments, and its place in D&C 68:15, 19 was the consequence of the editing of the revelations for the 1835 publication of the Doctrine and Covenants (that is, subsequent to the reception of section 107). Hence, only a few textual precedents can be cited for the sudden apperance here of Melchizedek, at least one of which was not widely disseminated: the Book of Mormon discussion of Melchizedek in Alma 13, the JST expansion on the Melchizedek story in Gen 14 (closely related, in many ways, to Alma's discourse on Melchizedek), and the reference in D&C 76:57. Of course, there had been discussion since the June 1831 "endowment of power" about both "the high priesthood" and "the order of Melchizedek," but there was not, until this revelation, any talk of "the Melchizedek Priesthood" as such. What all of this would seem to suggest is that any historically responsible interpretation of this passage would have to draw on a hermeneutic of all pre-Melchizedek-Priesthood passages discussing Melchizedek to get a clear sense of how this figure was understood in Mormonism.
  • D&C 107:3: Order of the Son of God. This, much like the reference to Melchizedek, would have called the Vision to mind in 1835: "They are they who are priests and kings, who have received of his fulness, and of his glory; And are priests of the Most High, after the order of Melchizedek, which was after the order of Enoch, which was after the order of the Only Begotten Son: (D&C 76:56-57).
  • D&C 107:5: Appendages. The word "appendages" had already been used three years previous in terms of the priesthood: cf. D&C 84:29-30. This earlier usage suggests the profoundly "Old Testament"—if not "Old Testament temple"—understanding of the priesthood that undergirds the revelations in the Doctrine and Covenants.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:1. Should we regard this division of priesthood as indicative of inherent and eternal differences or divisions? Or do the modifiers (Melchizedek, Aaronic and Levitical--and Patriarchal) serve some purpose other than that of classifying or subdividing priesthood?
  • D&C 107:1. Why does the Lord describe "two" priesthoods when using three descriptive modifiers?
  • D&C 107:1. How is a Latter-day Saint to understand this priesthood framework in light of the rituals of the ancient and modern temples? How did the Lord intend for Joseph and the Elders to receive it in the nineteenth century? How does that voice to nineteenth century members resonate today?
  • D&C 107:1. Given the introductory language of the heading to the Section, when was this early portion of the Section received?
  • D&C 107:1. Is the Lord saying that the Levitical priesthood is included in the Aaronic? Or in the combination of Aaronic and Melchizedek? Does the temple answer this question fully?
  • D&C 107:2. Is addition to providing Latter-day Saints seeking for cursory answers with an explanation, is the Lord attempting to incorporate by reference the typology of Melchizedek's ministry? Not to mention the "King of Righteousness" element...
  • D&C 107:3. "Holy" raises many implications and potential avenues for intertwining the Priesthood with the temple, the law of sacrifice, and the atonement, to name a few...
  • D&C 107:3. What "Order" is being referenced? (Patriarchal? United? ...)
  • D&C 107:4. Which name was being respected or reverenced? Calling it the Melchizedek Priesthood omits the phrase "after the Order of the Son of God." Was the concern for "Son?" Or "God?" Both of which are frequently used by Latter-day Saints...
  • D&C 107:4. How does referring to the Priesthood as "Melchizedek" respect the Supreme Being's name? How does it reverence the name? How does it avoid too frequent repetition (given the other contexts in which both "Son" and "God" are used)?
  • D&C 107:5. What other authorities exist in the church? Aaronic priesthood? Other priesthoods? Other authority? What other offices?
  • D&C 107:5. What is an appendage to the priesthood? What has been identified as such? How do they append the Priesthood? Is the Lord seeking to turn our minds to Paul's teachings on members individually and collectively?
  • D&C 107:6. To what does the Lord refer in calling the divisions "grand heads?" What sort of imagery is being used?
  • D&C 107:6. The Lord apparently equates the Aaronic and Levitical Priesthoods. Yet why use different names? Is/should one be preferred over another as Melchizedek is preferred to its prior name referenced in verse 2? Do the modifiers "Aaronic" and "Levitical" describe the same authority, but refer to the differing ways of receiving that authority?
  • D&C 107:6. What about priesthood lends itself to this division among a "greater" and "lesser/prepatory"?
  • D&C 107:6. What do we learn from priesthood lineage? Is it just about tracing our authority to God? Or does knowing one's priesthood "genealogy" create a new identity to reorient us toward an eternal (kingdom of priests)?
  • D&C 107:6. What does the right or privilege of ordination to the priesthood reveal to us about the way that the Lord administers his kingdom?
  • D&C 107:6. Textually, the introductory "But" seems to suggest that this passage is meant to appear contradictory to the prior verses, suggesting a line of understanding that initial passage toward reading verses one through five as suggesting a unity of priesthood, whereas verse six acknowledges that despite the unity, subdivisions may also exist.
  • D&C 107:7. Continuing the theme of subdivisions, the Lord indicates that the office that had initially been the highest office in the Church (with Joseph and Oliver acting as First and Second Elders, respectively), pertains to the subdivision of the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:7. Why would the Lord use the word "office" to describe the priesthood? Is the word intended to evoke secular themes of political offices? Can that trajectory direct a careful student toward oaths of office in understanding the "Oath and Covenant" of the priesthood?
  • D&C 107:7. Why phrase it "the office of an elder" rather than merely "the office of elder?" Should the phrasing change our understanding or preconceived notions of what an office means?
  • D&C 107:7. This verse, in its entirety, seems to underpin the teaching (in D&C 84:29) that elders are an appendage to the Melchizedek priesthood.
  • D&C 107:8. What context informs our understanding of what "the right of presidency" means?
  • D&C 107:9. Again, an understanding of the temple seems essential for an informed discussion of "officiating in all the offices." Likewise, the phrase "Presidency of the High Priesthood" raises questions such as "what makes the 'High Priesthood' unique?" "How does it differ from the Aaronic and Melchizedek?"
  • D&C 107:10. The history of "high priests" seems to parallel the history of this section, with some parts revealed earlier than others and a fragmentary understanding informing prior iterations. How does the office of high priest differ from other offices? (Consider quorum size restrictions, presiding authority, etc., and compare the context of the early church with more contemporary times.)
  • D&C 107:10. The list of "elder, priest ... teacher, deacon, and member seems intended to incorporate by reference Section 20. How do the two sections intersect?
  • D&C 107:10. By specifying "priest (of the Levitical order)" does the Lord intend to draw a distinction between Levitical priests and Aaronic priests? Or is the phrase from verse 6 equating the two intended to blur that distinction? Given the theme of a unified priesthood with subdivisions, this parenthetical reference may prove instructive in providing insight to the Lord's teachings on priesthood...
  • D&C 107:16. What significance can we as readers attribute to the phrase "legal right" in verse 16?
  • D&C 107:16. Why would the Lord introduce the concepts of "legal rights" to Priesthood offices and of literal descendants having such rights in the context of the bishopric instead of connecting them to the Patriarchal Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:16. In what other circumstances is the verb "officiate" used?
  • D&C 107:17. Does verse 17 suggest that the First Presidency (the Presidency of the Melchizedek Priesthood) has the responsibility to call and set apart and ordain all bishops? Or just the Presiding Bishop? And is the phrasing of verse 17 intended to suggest that a literal descendant with a legal right to the office need not be called, set apart nor ordained?
  • D&C 107:18. How should we understand holding keys, specifically keys of all spiritual blessings, as constituting "[t]he power and authority" of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:19. What significance should be given to the allusion to Revelation and the New Testament concept of "mysteries" in connection with a description or elaboration of the privileges, power and authority of the Priesthood?
  • D&C 107:20. What principled distinctions can be drawn from the keys held by the two (greater and lesser) priesthoods? Does the "temporal versus spiritual" distinction break down when actually examining the keys held? If so, is one difference that of temporality: pre- versus post-salvation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • See here for the "original" revelation that is verses 1-58 of this section. See here for the "original" sources for the remainder of the section.
  • See here for a series of posts on this section at boap.org.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 107                      Next page: Verses 107:21-32

D&C 107:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:21-32
Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:21-32 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:21-32 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:21-32: Beyond characterizing the priesthoods in general. Beginning with verse 21, this revelation radically altered the saints' understanding of the priesthood, systematizing and organizing it so that it might function as a form of government, in addition to its "cultic" role, dwelt upon in the previous verses. Each verse that follows in this revelation is worth very careful consideration: each has had a major impact on the structure of the Church, as well as on the understanding of the priesthood.
The setting is significant. 1835 marks the establishment of church government--an incredibly controversial moment in LDS history now and then ("apostasy" from the Church's organization--as opposed to apostasy from the Church's moral standards or from the contents of a particular revelation--might well be said to center on this very moment of institutionalization, both in Joseph's day and even now). The same year also marks the supersecion of the "Book of Commandments" by the "Doctrine and Covenants," the latter text radically altering the former--most obviously in focus and function, but also in actual wording. More still, 1835 is also marked by the acceleration of the work on the Kirtland House of the Lord, with its accompanying emphasis on priesthood. Though this revelation comes early in the year, all of these events form a sort of aura around it.
Perhaps still more significant is the immediate textual setting: what follows not only marks a sort of "departure" from previous revelations on the priesthood, it makes a "departure"--as it were--from the characterization of the priesthood offered in the previous twenty verses! But this very fact ensures that what follows is not, strictly speaking, a departure. Rather, something is being added--by the Lord, it must be remembered--to the priesthood ("added" might be the best word to be used here: the governmental structure of the priesthood does not appear to be "eternal"; cf. D&C 84:29-30, D&C 107:5). Government for the Church, in other words, is a duty the Lord decided to assign to the priesthood (which, in and of itself, was not of governmental function). All these details, it should be hoped, establish the absolute importance of what begins with verse 21.
  • D&C 107:21. So radical a shift in the role of the priesthood begins with two vital words: "Of necessity...."
  • D&C 107:22. This verse marks the first instance of the word "quorum" in scripture. Besides its numerous appearances in the following verses, it only shows up elsewhere in D&C 124:62 and 117ff. The institutional importance of a word so seldomly used in scripture suggests that these two revelations are vital for understanding the role and development of the structure of the priesthood in terms of government. (If a broad characterization of section 107 as over and against section 124 is justified: section 107 deals with the introduction and grounding of quorums, while section 124 basically only mentions quorums because the revelation provides names for some specific positions in those quorums. In other words, section 107 is "theoretical," whereas section 124 is "practical." However, it should not be missed how much the "practicality" of section 124 establishes the vitality of more "theoretical" section 107: the institutional importance of the quorums of the priesthood is not a late phenomenon, but something that developed rather quickly--within the lifetime of the prophet Joseph.
It is vital to note that in this passage (as it extends through to verse 37), however, the quorums that are discussed are only the quorums that govern the Church in the broadest sense. The word "quorum," then, appears to have been understood in its more "official" sense. In fact, by 1835, the less official senses of the word were mostly obselete (see the OED entry on "quorum"), and the 1828 Webster's dictionary lists only meanings that bear on official practices (all implying, interestingly, a situation of judgment or justice). The establishment at work in these verses is not, it must be understood, the establishment of the hierarchical quorums of the priesthood. Rather, it is the establishment of a governing system of quorums/councils who have the authority to conduct the business of the entire Church. Verse 32 is perhaps the clearest confirmation of this point: these several quorums (apparently meaning only the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Quorum of the Seventy) "constitute the spiritual authorities of the church." In short, this first instance of "quorums" in scripture is an establishment, not of the quorums of the priesthood, but of the quorums of general authorities in the several and balancing levels of authority. Hence when, later in the revelation, the Lord discusses the "quorums" of the priests, teachers, and deacons, He never uses the term "quorum" at all (see verses 85-90, a series of verses quoted there from an otherwise unpublished revelation of November 1831). (It might be noted further that even in D&C 124, there is never mention of a quorum in the Aaronic Priesthood. Though there is some discussion there of the quorum of the elders, the wording is complex, and this might be only a reference to the quorum of the seventy. The implication seems to be that, at least at first, quorums were only a question of the High Priesthood.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a witness of the name of Christ?
  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a special witness of that name?
  • D&C 107:23. Which authorities are special witnesses of Christ?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39

D&C 107:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:21-32
Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:21-32 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:21-32 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:21-32: Beyond characterizing the priesthoods in general. Beginning with verse 21, this revelation radically altered the saints' understanding of the priesthood, systematizing and organizing it so that it might function as a form of government, in addition to its "cultic" role, dwelt upon in the previous verses. Each verse that follows in this revelation is worth very careful consideration: each has had a major impact on the structure of the Church, as well as on the understanding of the priesthood.
The setting is significant. 1835 marks the establishment of church government--an incredibly controversial moment in LDS history now and then ("apostasy" from the Church's organization--as opposed to apostasy from the Church's moral standards or from the contents of a particular revelation--might well be said to center on this very moment of institutionalization, both in Joseph's day and even now). The same year also marks the supersecion of the "Book of Commandments" by the "Doctrine and Covenants," the latter text radically altering the former--most obviously in focus and function, but also in actual wording. More still, 1835 is also marked by the acceleration of the work on the Kirtland House of the Lord, with its accompanying emphasis on priesthood. Though this revelation comes early in the year, all of these events form a sort of aura around it.
Perhaps still more significant is the immediate textual setting: what follows not only marks a sort of "departure" from previous revelations on the priesthood, it makes a "departure"--as it were--from the characterization of the priesthood offered in the previous twenty verses! But this very fact ensures that what follows is not, strictly speaking, a departure. Rather, something is being added--by the Lord, it must be remembered--to the priesthood ("added" might be the best word to be used here: the governmental structure of the priesthood does not appear to be "eternal"; cf. D&C 84:29-30, D&C 107:5). Government for the Church, in other words, is a duty the Lord decided to assign to the priesthood (which, in and of itself, was not of governmental function). All these details, it should be hoped, establish the absolute importance of what begins with verse 21.
  • D&C 107:21. So radical a shift in the role of the priesthood begins with two vital words: "Of necessity...."
  • D&C 107:22. This verse marks the first instance of the word "quorum" in scripture. Besides its numerous appearances in the following verses, it only shows up elsewhere in D&C 124:62 and 117ff. The institutional importance of a word so seldomly used in scripture suggests that these two revelations are vital for understanding the role and development of the structure of the priesthood in terms of government. (If a broad characterization of section 107 as over and against section 124 is justified: section 107 deals with the introduction and grounding of quorums, while section 124 basically only mentions quorums because the revelation provides names for some specific positions in those quorums. In other words, section 107 is "theoretical," whereas section 124 is "practical." However, it should not be missed how much the "practicality" of section 124 establishes the vitality of more "theoretical" section 107: the institutional importance of the quorums of the priesthood is not a late phenomenon, but something that developed rather quickly--within the lifetime of the prophet Joseph.
It is vital to note that in this passage (as it extends through to verse 37), however, the quorums that are discussed are only the quorums that govern the Church in the broadest sense. The word "quorum," then, appears to have been understood in its more "official" sense. In fact, by 1835, the less official senses of the word were mostly obselete (see the OED entry on "quorum"), and the 1828 Webster's dictionary lists only meanings that bear on official practices (all implying, interestingly, a situation of judgment or justice). The establishment at work in these verses is not, it must be understood, the establishment of the hierarchical quorums of the priesthood. Rather, it is the establishment of a governing system of quorums/councils who have the authority to conduct the business of the entire Church. Verse 32 is perhaps the clearest confirmation of this point: these several quorums (apparently meaning only the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Quorum of the Seventy) "constitute the spiritual authorities of the church." In short, this first instance of "quorums" in scripture is an establishment, not of the quorums of the priesthood, but of the quorums of general authorities in the several and balancing levels of authority. Hence when, later in the revelation, the Lord discusses the "quorums" of the priests, teachers, and deacons, He never uses the term "quorum" at all (see verses 85-90, a series of verses quoted there from an otherwise unpublished revelation of November 1831). (It might be noted further that even in D&C 124, there is never mention of a quorum in the Aaronic Priesthood. Though there is some discussion there of the quorum of the elders, the wording is complex, and this might be only a reference to the quorum of the seventy. The implication seems to be that, at least at first, quorums were only a question of the High Priesthood.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a witness of the name of Christ?
  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a special witness of that name?
  • D&C 107:23. Which authorities are special witnesses of Christ?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39

D&C 107:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:21-32
Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:21-32 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:21-32 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:21-32: Beyond characterizing the priesthoods in general. Beginning with verse 21, this revelation radically altered the saints' understanding of the priesthood, systematizing and organizing it so that it might function as a form of government, in addition to its "cultic" role, dwelt upon in the previous verses. Each verse that follows in this revelation is worth very careful consideration: each has had a major impact on the structure of the Church, as well as on the understanding of the priesthood.
The setting is significant. 1835 marks the establishment of church government--an incredibly controversial moment in LDS history now and then ("apostasy" from the Church's organization--as opposed to apostasy from the Church's moral standards or from the contents of a particular revelation--might well be said to center on this very moment of institutionalization, both in Joseph's day and even now). The same year also marks the supersecion of the "Book of Commandments" by the "Doctrine and Covenants," the latter text radically altering the former--most obviously in focus and function, but also in actual wording. More still, 1835 is also marked by the acceleration of the work on the Kirtland House of the Lord, with its accompanying emphasis on priesthood. Though this revelation comes early in the year, all of these events form a sort of aura around it.
Perhaps still more significant is the immediate textual setting: what follows not only marks a sort of "departure" from previous revelations on the priesthood, it makes a "departure"--as it were--from the characterization of the priesthood offered in the previous twenty verses! But this very fact ensures that what follows is not, strictly speaking, a departure. Rather, something is being added--by the Lord, it must be remembered--to the priesthood ("added" might be the best word to be used here: the governmental structure of the priesthood does not appear to be "eternal"; cf. D&C 84:29-30, D&C 107:5). Government for the Church, in other words, is a duty the Lord decided to assign to the priesthood (which, in and of itself, was not of governmental function). All these details, it should be hoped, establish the absolute importance of what begins with verse 21.
  • D&C 107:21. So radical a shift in the role of the priesthood begins with two vital words: "Of necessity...."
  • D&C 107:22. This verse marks the first instance of the word "quorum" in scripture. Besides its numerous appearances in the following verses, it only shows up elsewhere in D&C 124:62 and 117ff. The institutional importance of a word so seldomly used in scripture suggests that these two revelations are vital for understanding the role and development of the structure of the priesthood in terms of government. (If a broad characterization of section 107 as over and against section 124 is justified: section 107 deals with the introduction and grounding of quorums, while section 124 basically only mentions quorums because the revelation provides names for some specific positions in those quorums. In other words, section 107 is "theoretical," whereas section 124 is "practical." However, it should not be missed how much the "practicality" of section 124 establishes the vitality of more "theoretical" section 107: the institutional importance of the quorums of the priesthood is not a late phenomenon, but something that developed rather quickly--within the lifetime of the prophet Joseph.
It is vital to note that in this passage (as it extends through to verse 37), however, the quorums that are discussed are only the quorums that govern the Church in the broadest sense. The word "quorum," then, appears to have been understood in its more "official" sense. In fact, by 1835, the less official senses of the word were mostly obselete (see the OED entry on "quorum"), and the 1828 Webster's dictionary lists only meanings that bear on official practices (all implying, interestingly, a situation of judgment or justice). The establishment at work in these verses is not, it must be understood, the establishment of the hierarchical quorums of the priesthood. Rather, it is the establishment of a governing system of quorums/councils who have the authority to conduct the business of the entire Church. Verse 32 is perhaps the clearest confirmation of this point: these several quorums (apparently meaning only the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve, and the Quorum of the Seventy) "constitute the spiritual authorities of the church." In short, this first instance of "quorums" in scripture is an establishment, not of the quorums of the priesthood, but of the quorums of general authorities in the several and balancing levels of authority. Hence when, later in the revelation, the Lord discusses the "quorums" of the priests, teachers, and deacons, He never uses the term "quorum" at all (see verses 85-90, a series of verses quoted there from an otherwise unpublished revelation of November 1831). (It might be noted further that even in D&C 124, there is never mention of a quorum in the Aaronic Priesthood. Though there is some discussion there of the quorum of the elders, the wording is complex, and this might be only a reference to the quorum of the seventy. The implication seems to be that, at least at first, quorums were only a question of the High Priesthood.)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a witness of the name of Christ?
  • D&C 107:23. What does it mean to be a special witness of that name?
  • D&C 107:23. Which authorities are special witnesses of Christ?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:1-20                      Next page: Verses 107:33-39

D&C 107:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:33-39
Previous page: Verses 107:21-32                      Next page: Verses 107:40-57


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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:33-39 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:33-39 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:39. Here the Lord introduces the office of patriarch, calling those to be ordained to the office, however, "evangelical ministers." Juxtaposed with the lengthy explanation of "this order of the priesthood" that begins with the next verse and continues through verse 57, the title seems odd--and for a number of reasons. The following verses suggest a single line of patriarchs, whereas the commandment in this verse suggests that a number of different patriarchs are to be called in different places. Further, the following verses suggest the most ancient, Old Testament setting for the office, whereas the title "evangelical ministers" has a decisively New Testament flavor (not least because "evangelical" derives from Greek). Finally, though in the following verses it is clear that the patriarchs were part of a more complex covenantal situation (see especially verse 40), the "evangelical ministers" to be called are to be called quite simply "by revelation." In short, the lengthy explanation of the most ancient order of patriarchs seems more to frustrate than to ground this verse (verse 39).
However, that the lengthy explanation turns almost immediately to Adam, in whom "this order was instituted" (verse 41), is quite suggestive: the New Testament flavor of "evangelical ministers" might just imply that in the Second Adam, the order has been made new, has been taken up into the logic of charity, has been opened up so that all might become "literal descendants of the chosen seed" through adoptions as sons (in the Son). In other words, the difference between the office named in verse 39 and the office described at length in verses 40-57 should be felt. The priesthood after the order of the father (the "patriarchal" order), once so perfectly exclusive, has been made "available" through the equally "available" priesthood after the order of the Son (from son to father) that Jesus Christ liberated through atonement. The purpose, then, of the lengthy description of the "original" patriarchal order might be at least twofold: on the one hand, the passage establishes the erstwhile exclusivity of a priesthood order now opened up through the available effects of the atonement; on the other hand, the passage deals at length with the meaning and possibilities of the office that remain, even though the possibility of receiving the order has changed.
The subsequent history of the office of Patriarch may validate this understanding as the lineal descendants of a single family (Joseph Smith, Sr.) served as Presiding Patriarch to the Church until Eldred G. Smith was given emeritus status in 1979. The recent teachings of President Boyd K. Packer indicate that a patriarch acts in a prophetic role (Oct. 2002 General Conference). Although not sustained as such (perhaps non-sustained callings provides food for thought in another vein altogether), stake patriarchs act in a prophetic capacity for their stake,just as the Presiding Patriarch was explicitly sustained as a prophet seer and revelator. The trend toward making the prophetic role available to each stake suggests that the role may extend to the more fundamental units of the church until each household ideally has a patriarch acting in the role of prophet for the family unit. Although speculative, this trajectory validates the textual description of the patriarchal order and the Second Adam opening history back toward the original patriarchal order, thus dividing and uniting history simultaneously.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:33-35. How do these verses clarify the relations between the three presiding quorums of the Church?
  • D&C 107:33-35. What does it mean to say that the Presidency and the Seventy should build up and regulate all the affairs of the church “first unto the Gentiles and secondly unto the Jews” (verses 33-34)?
  • D&C 107:33-35. What does it mean to us that the gospel is to be proclaimed by the Twelve “first unto the Gentiles and then unto the Jews”?
  • D&C 107:39. Given the understanding of the Twelve in this revelation as a traveling high council, how should the relationship between the Twelve and the "evangelical ministers" or patriarchs be understood?
  • D&C 107:39. How should the word "evangelical" be read here? What precendent might there have been for this language? How might it be connected with the phrase "preacher of righteousness" (cf. Moses 6:23; 2 Pet 2:5)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:21-32                      Next page: Verses 107:40-57

D&C 107:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:40-57
Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:40-57 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:40-57 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:41-57: The genealogy of Adam and the blessing at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Verses 41-57 lay out a genealogy of Adam that is at once obviously connected to the similar genealogy in Moses 6:8-23; 8:1-11 and at the same time obviously to be read in light of the event of Adam-ondi-Ahman. A bit of reconstruction is presented in the following table:
  Patriarch          Adam's Age at Birth          Adam's Age at Ordination
  Seth                       130                            199
  Enos                       235                            369
  Cainan                     325                            412
  Mahalaleel                 395                            891
  Jared                      460                            660
  Enoch                      622                            647
  Methuselah                 687                            787
  Lamech                     874                            906
  Noah                    deceased                        deceased
While the emphasis in this table is on ordination, it is clear from the text itself that there is a parallel emphasis on blessing. But the story, so far as blessing goes, is hardly so clear: Seth seems to have received his blessing only at Adam-ondi-Ahman, just before Adam's death, while Enoch received his at age sixty-five, which would have thus occurred during Adam's 687th year; moreover, while blessings are mentioned for Mahalaleel and Jared, none are specifically mentioned in relation to any of the other patriarchs (though it may be that the mention of Adam bestowing his last blessing on his posterity at Adam-ondi-Ahman may be meant to include the others).
All of this suggests the necessity of riddling out what is meant here by ordination as opposed to blessing: what is this blessing and why is it given only after ordination? Most likely, verse 42 provides the answer to this question, though this remains to be explored in any significant depth.
  • D&C 107:42. The promise given to Seth by Adam is interesting for a number of reasons. The context, of course, is that of the passing of the patriarchal order from Adam to Seth, and this verse therefore makes it clear that part of the patriarchal priesthood is a promise that some remnant of the patriarch's seed will be present at the last day (cf. Moses 7:52). This is especially interesting because of the role Seth played in replacing Abel (see on this, especially, Moses 6:2, where Adam explains "God hath appointed me another seed, instead of Abel, whom Cain slew"). The focus on Seth's seed should probably, then, be read in light of Abel's apparent lack of seed, which seems to have been understood quite negatively.
The promise of having a chosen seed that will last until the second coming (and will bless all nations through the priesthood) has been given to many other scriptural figures. For example:
Moses 7:52 says Enoch is promised there will be a remnant of his seed among all nations
Abraham 2:9-11 Abraham, after seeking for the “appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed” (Abr 1:4), is promised that in him and in his seed all the families of the earth will be blessed. References to this Abrahamic Covenant are also found in Gen 12:2-4, Gen 17:5-7, and Gen 22:17-18
Gen 26:3-5 renews the covenant with Isaac
Gen 35:9-12 renews the covenant with Jacob
Gen 49:26 specifically says the blessings of father Jacob will be upon Joseph. This is confirmed in Gen 50:34 JST and 2 Nephi 3:16 (“I will preserve thy seed forever.”)
D&C 110:12 renews the promise of a chosen seed to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdry: Elias commits the dispensation of the gospel of Abraham, “saying that in us and our seed all generations after us shall be blessed.”
D&C 84:34 We can become part of the promised seed of Abraham when we receive the Melchizedek Priesthood

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:40. To what extent does the language of the phrase, "the order of this priesthood," imply a kind of split between the patriarchal priesthood being described and the two priesthoods with which the revelation begins? What is implied by the word "order"?
  • D&C 107:40. What does it mean to say that this order of the priesthood was confirmed? Does this imply the working of some particular subject who confirmed it? How can it be confirmed to be handed down genealogically?
  • D&C 107:40. How ought the language of rights ("rightly belongs") be interpreted here?
  • D&C 107:40. How is this revelation connected to the Book of Abraham, the first chapter of which Joseph was translating at about the same time as the reception of this revelation?
  • D&C 107:40. Why should there be an emphasis on literal descendants here? What might non-literal descendants mean?
  • D&C 107:40. What should be read into the word "chosen," and is there some specific reference implied in the language of the promises that were made?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100

D&C 107:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:40-57
Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:40-57 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:40-57 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:41-57: The genealogy of Adam and the blessing at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Verses 41-57 lay out a genealogy of Adam that is at once obviously connected to the similar genealogy in Moses 6:8-23; 8:1-11 and at the same time obviously to be read in light of the event of Adam-ondi-Ahman. A bit of reconstruction is presented in the following table:
  Patriarch          Adam's Age at Birth          Adam's Age at Ordination
  Seth                       130                            199
  Enos                       235                            369
  Cainan                     325                            412
  Mahalaleel                 395                            891
  Jared                      460                            660
  Enoch                      622                            647
  Methuselah                 687                            787
  Lamech                     874                            906
  Noah                    deceased                        deceased
While the emphasis in this table is on ordination, it is clear from the text itself that there is a parallel emphasis on blessing. But the story, so far as blessing goes, is hardly so clear: Seth seems to have received his blessing only at Adam-ondi-Ahman, just before Adam's death, while Enoch received his at age sixty-five, which would have thus occurred during Adam's 687th year; moreover, while blessings are mentioned for Mahalaleel and Jared, none are specifically mentioned in relation to any of the other patriarchs (though it may be that the mention of Adam bestowing his last blessing on his posterity at Adam-ondi-Ahman may be meant to include the others).
All of this suggests the necessity of riddling out what is meant here by ordination as opposed to blessing: what is this blessing and why is it given only after ordination? Most likely, verse 42 provides the answer to this question, though this remains to be explored in any significant depth.
  • D&C 107:42. The promise given to Seth by Adam is interesting for a number of reasons. The context, of course, is that of the passing of the patriarchal order from Adam to Seth, and this verse therefore makes it clear that part of the patriarchal priesthood is a promise that some remnant of the patriarch's seed will be present at the last day (cf. Moses 7:52). This is especially interesting because of the role Seth played in replacing Abel (see on this, especially, Moses 6:2, where Adam explains "God hath appointed me another seed, instead of Abel, whom Cain slew"). The focus on Seth's seed should probably, then, be read in light of Abel's apparent lack of seed, which seems to have been understood quite negatively.
The promise of having a chosen seed that will last until the second coming (and will bless all nations through the priesthood) has been given to many other scriptural figures. For example:
Moses 7:52 says Enoch is promised there will be a remnant of his seed among all nations
Abraham 2:9-11 Abraham, after seeking for the “appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed” (Abr 1:4), is promised that in him and in his seed all the families of the earth will be blessed. References to this Abrahamic Covenant are also found in Gen 12:2-4, Gen 17:5-7, and Gen 22:17-18
Gen 26:3-5 renews the covenant with Isaac
Gen 35:9-12 renews the covenant with Jacob
Gen 49:26 specifically says the blessings of father Jacob will be upon Joseph. This is confirmed in Gen 50:34 JST and 2 Nephi 3:16 (“I will preserve thy seed forever.”)
D&C 110:12 renews the promise of a chosen seed to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdry: Elias commits the dispensation of the gospel of Abraham, “saying that in us and our seed all generations after us shall be blessed.”
D&C 84:34 We can become part of the promised seed of Abraham when we receive the Melchizedek Priesthood

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:40. To what extent does the language of the phrase, "the order of this priesthood," imply a kind of split between the patriarchal priesthood being described and the two priesthoods with which the revelation begins? What is implied by the word "order"?
  • D&C 107:40. What does it mean to say that this order of the priesthood was confirmed? Does this imply the working of some particular subject who confirmed it? How can it be confirmed to be handed down genealogically?
  • D&C 107:40. How ought the language of rights ("rightly belongs") be interpreted here?
  • D&C 107:40. How is this revelation connected to the Book of Abraham, the first chapter of which Joseph was translating at about the same time as the reception of this revelation?
  • D&C 107:40. Why should there be an emphasis on literal descendants here? What might non-literal descendants mean?
  • D&C 107:40. What should be read into the word "chosen," and is there some specific reference implied in the language of the promises that were made?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100

D&C 107:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:40-57
Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:40-57 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:40-57 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:41-57: The genealogy of Adam and the blessing at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Verses 41-57 lay out a genealogy of Adam that is at once obviously connected to the similar genealogy in Moses 6:8-23; 8:1-11 and at the same time obviously to be read in light of the event of Adam-ondi-Ahman. A bit of reconstruction is presented in the following table:
  Patriarch          Adam's Age at Birth          Adam's Age at Ordination
  Seth                       130                            199
  Enos                       235                            369
  Cainan                     325                            412
  Mahalaleel                 395                            891
  Jared                      460                            660
  Enoch                      622                            647
  Methuselah                 687                            787
  Lamech                     874                            906
  Noah                    deceased                        deceased
While the emphasis in this table is on ordination, it is clear from the text itself that there is a parallel emphasis on blessing. But the story, so far as blessing goes, is hardly so clear: Seth seems to have received his blessing only at Adam-ondi-Ahman, just before Adam's death, while Enoch received his at age sixty-five, which would have thus occurred during Adam's 687th year; moreover, while blessings are mentioned for Mahalaleel and Jared, none are specifically mentioned in relation to any of the other patriarchs (though it may be that the mention of Adam bestowing his last blessing on his posterity at Adam-ondi-Ahman may be meant to include the others).
All of this suggests the necessity of riddling out what is meant here by ordination as opposed to blessing: what is this blessing and why is it given only after ordination? Most likely, verse 42 provides the answer to this question, though this remains to be explored in any significant depth.
  • D&C 107:42. The promise given to Seth by Adam is interesting for a number of reasons. The context, of course, is that of the passing of the patriarchal order from Adam to Seth, and this verse therefore makes it clear that part of the patriarchal priesthood is a promise that some remnant of the patriarch's seed will be present at the last day (cf. Moses 7:52). This is especially interesting because of the role Seth played in replacing Abel (see on this, especially, Moses 6:2, where Adam explains "God hath appointed me another seed, instead of Abel, whom Cain slew"). The focus on Seth's seed should probably, then, be read in light of Abel's apparent lack of seed, which seems to have been understood quite negatively.
The promise of having a chosen seed that will last until the second coming (and will bless all nations through the priesthood) has been given to many other scriptural figures. For example:
Moses 7:52 says Enoch is promised there will be a remnant of his seed among all nations
Abraham 2:9-11 Abraham, after seeking for the “appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed” (Abr 1:4), is promised that in him and in his seed all the families of the earth will be blessed. References to this Abrahamic Covenant are also found in Gen 12:2-4, Gen 17:5-7, and Gen 22:17-18
Gen 26:3-5 renews the covenant with Isaac
Gen 35:9-12 renews the covenant with Jacob
Gen 49:26 specifically says the blessings of father Jacob will be upon Joseph. This is confirmed in Gen 50:34 JST and 2 Nephi 3:16 (“I will preserve thy seed forever.”)
D&C 110:12 renews the promise of a chosen seed to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdry: Elias commits the dispensation of the gospel of Abraham, “saying that in us and our seed all generations after us shall be blessed.”
D&C 84:34 We can become part of the promised seed of Abraham when we receive the Melchizedek Priesthood

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:40. To what extent does the language of the phrase, "the order of this priesthood," imply a kind of split between the patriarchal priesthood being described and the two priesthoods with which the revelation begins? What is implied by the word "order"?
  • D&C 107:40. What does it mean to say that this order of the priesthood was confirmed? Does this imply the working of some particular subject who confirmed it? How can it be confirmed to be handed down genealogically?
  • D&C 107:40. How ought the language of rights ("rightly belongs") be interpreted here?
  • D&C 107:40. How is this revelation connected to the Book of Abraham, the first chapter of which Joseph was translating at about the same time as the reception of this revelation?
  • D&C 107:40. Why should there be an emphasis on literal descendants here? What might non-literal descendants mean?
  • D&C 107:40. What should be read into the word "chosen," and is there some specific reference implied in the language of the promises that were made?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100

D&C 107:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:40-57
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Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:40-57 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:40-57 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:41-57: The genealogy of Adam and the blessing at Adam-ondi-Ahman. Verses 41-57 lay out a genealogy of Adam that is at once obviously connected to the similar genealogy in Moses 6:8-23; 8:1-11 and at the same time obviously to be read in light of the event of Adam-ondi-Ahman. A bit of reconstruction is presented in the following table:
  Patriarch          Adam's Age at Birth          Adam's Age at Ordination
  Seth                       130                            199
  Enos                       235                            369
  Cainan                     325                            412
  Mahalaleel                 395                            891
  Jared                      460                            660
  Enoch                      622                            647
  Methuselah                 687                            787
  Lamech                     874                            906
  Noah                    deceased                        deceased
While the emphasis in this table is on ordination, it is clear from the text itself that there is a parallel emphasis on blessing. But the story, so far as blessing goes, is hardly so clear: Seth seems to have received his blessing only at Adam-ondi-Ahman, just before Adam's death, while Enoch received his at age sixty-five, which would have thus occurred during Adam's 687th year; moreover, while blessings are mentioned for Mahalaleel and Jared, none are specifically mentioned in relation to any of the other patriarchs (though it may be that the mention of Adam bestowing his last blessing on his posterity at Adam-ondi-Ahman may be meant to include the others).
All of this suggests the necessity of riddling out what is meant here by ordination as opposed to blessing: what is this blessing and why is it given only after ordination? Most likely, verse 42 provides the answer to this question, though this remains to be explored in any significant depth.
  • D&C 107:42. The promise given to Seth by Adam is interesting for a number of reasons. The context, of course, is that of the passing of the patriarchal order from Adam to Seth, and this verse therefore makes it clear that part of the patriarchal priesthood is a promise that some remnant of the patriarch's seed will be present at the last day (cf. Moses 7:52). This is especially interesting because of the role Seth played in replacing Abel (see on this, especially, Moses 6:2, where Adam explains "God hath appointed me another seed, instead of Abel, whom Cain slew"). The focus on Seth's seed should probably, then, be read in light of Abel's apparent lack of seed, which seems to have been understood quite negatively.
The promise of having a chosen seed that will last until the second coming (and will bless all nations through the priesthood) has been given to many other scriptural figures. For example:
Moses 7:52 says Enoch is promised there will be a remnant of his seed among all nations
Abraham 2:9-11 Abraham, after seeking for the “appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed” (Abr 1:4), is promised that in him and in his seed all the families of the earth will be blessed. References to this Abrahamic Covenant are also found in Gen 12:2-4, Gen 17:5-7, and Gen 22:17-18
Gen 26:3-5 renews the covenant with Isaac
Gen 35:9-12 renews the covenant with Jacob
Gen 49:26 specifically says the blessings of father Jacob will be upon Joseph. This is confirmed in Gen 50:34 JST and 2 Nephi 3:16 (“I will preserve thy seed forever.”)
D&C 110:12 renews the promise of a chosen seed to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdry: Elias commits the dispensation of the gospel of Abraham, “saying that in us and our seed all generations after us shall be blessed.”
D&C 84:34 We can become part of the promised seed of Abraham when we receive the Melchizedek Priesthood

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:40. To what extent does the language of the phrase, "the order of this priesthood," imply a kind of split between the patriarchal priesthood being described and the two priesthoods with which the revelation begins? What is implied by the word "order"?
  • D&C 107:40. What does it mean to say that this order of the priesthood was confirmed? Does this imply the working of some particular subject who confirmed it? How can it be confirmed to be handed down genealogically?
  • D&C 107:40. How ought the language of rights ("rightly belongs") be interpreted here?
  • D&C 107:40. How is this revelation connected to the Book of Abraham, the first chapter of which Joseph was translating at about the same time as the reception of this revelation?
  • D&C 107:40. Why should there be an emphasis on literal descendants here? What might non-literal descendants mean?
  • D&C 107:40. What should be read into the word "chosen," and is there some specific reference implied in the language of the promises that were made?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:33-39                      Next page: Verses 107:58-100

D&C 107:61-65

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:66-70

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

D&C 107:71-75

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

D&C 107:76-80

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

D&C 107:81-85

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 107:40-57                      This is the last page for Section 107

D&C 107:86-90

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 107 > Verses 107:58-100
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:91-95

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 107:96-100

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 107. The relationship of Verses 107:58-100 to the rest of Section 107 is discussed at D&C 107.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 107:58-100 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 107:58. This verse should be read as returning to the theme of verse 39, continuing to address the duty of the Twelve in organizing the Church generally. However, the Lord here simply takes up an earlier, unpublished revelation in order to expound upon these duties. It should be noted, however, that much of the earlier revelation is revised in this repetition. See the commentary at the beginning of the section.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 121:31-35

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  • D&C 121:28: One God or Many Gods. The Lord indicates in verse 28 that in these Latter-days it will be revealed "whether there be one God or many gods". That revelation was delivered, at least in part, in verse 32, where we are introduced to the concept of a "Council of the Eternal God of all other gods". Joseph Smith expounded on this concept at length in later sermons, revealing some of the most profound teachings on this subject in the last few months of his life during a "meeting in the Grove east of the Temple on June 16, 1844" (see Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, p. 370).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 121:11: Hope shall be blasted. What kind of hope is this talking about? Why does God mention this particular form of punishment for the accusers? How is this related to the other forms of punishment and the reasons for that punishment described here and in the following passages? (See also v. 14.)
  • D&C 121:16: Lift up the heel. What does it mean to "lift up the heel against mine anointed"?
  • D&C 121:26: What does "unspeakable gift" mean when talking of the Holy Ghost?
  • D&C 121:28: Has this great outpouring of knowledge already occured? Is it in the process of occurring?
  • D&C 121:28: What must we do as individuals, and as a church, to be ready for or continue to receive this great outpouring of spiritual truth when "nothing will be withheld"?
  • D&C 121:28: What are we to make of the phrase "whether there be one God or many gods"? Why is the phrase tentative? Did Joseph Smith understand at this time whether there was one God or many gods?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 121:36-40

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  • D&C 121:36. This verse employs three distinct terms, the relationships among which need to be sorted out carefully: "the rights of the priesthood," "the powers of heaven," and "the principles of righteousness." The two of these terms ("rights" and "powers") are described as being "inseparably connected," while the second and third of these terms ("powers" and "principles" have a more complex relationship, the one ("principles") being a necessary condition for the other ("powers") to be "controlled" or "handled." What is at work in this complex of terms and relationships?
As for the term "rights of the priesthood," it should be noted that the language of "rights" only began to be associated with the priesthood, at least in revelation, in 1835—both in a revelation received that year (D&C 107) and in revisions of a revelation that had been received earlier (D&C 68). It would not be inappropriate to draw a connection between this development and the reception (in December of 1832) of the revelation that is now D&C 86, particularly verses 8-11, where the Saints were, for the first time, informed that they—or at least some of them—were direct descendants of those who had held authority anciently, making them "legal heirs" (cf. D&C 107:40). Of course, the language of "the rights of the priesthood" seldom refers to the right to the priesthood, but much more often refers to the rights of the priesthood, the rights conferred on one through the priesthood. Exemplary are the many references in section 107. Whereas earlier revelations (particularly D&C 20) had made reference first and foremost to the duties of the several offices of the priesthood, this revelation outlined the rights of those same offices (see especially verses 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12). In the end, it seems best to understand the "rights of the priesthood" here in section 121 in this latter manner: in question are the rights the priesthood itself bestows. And, if section 107 is the point of reference for making sense of what is meant by the priesthood's "rights," it seems that what is meant is the right specifically to officiate and to preside.
What, then, of the "powers of heaven"? The phrase is relatively rare in scripture. It's only biblical appearance is in Luke 21:26, though it appears also in Joseph Smith's revision of Matthew 24. In these two texts, the "powers of heaven" are shaken during the eschatological events surrounding the second coming of Christ, and in both cases the shaking of the powers in question is closely associated with the darkening of the sun and the moon, as well as the falling of the stars. The phrase appears three times in the Book of Mormon, all three of these in Third Nephi and on the lips of the Savior: 3 Ne 20:22; 21:25; and 28:7. (Note that the second of these references reads "power of heaven" rather than "powers of heaven" in the current edition. Royal Skousen's Earliest Text, however, provides the reading of "powers of heaven" for this text, bringing it into conformity with the other two references.) In Third Nephi, the phrase always appears in the context of the announcement of Christ's coming to Israel, accompanied by "the powers of heaven." In at least one of these references, it almost seems that "the powers of heaven" refers to actual persons (or angels?) who will accompany Christ to earth. This may be confirmed in Moses 7:27, where the phrase seems again to be a title for angels. At any rate, it seems best to understand the phrase as referring to "supernatural"—and even personal—assistance (or assistants). (Another reference, of no particular help, can be found in D&C 84:119.)
Finally, what is meant by "the principles of righteousness"? Interestingly, this passage marks the only appearance of this phrase in scripture. However, it is perhaps relatively easy to interpret, given that section 121 itself goes on to clarify it—something it does not do with the other terms here under consideration. The key comes only in verses 41-42. Before that, the reader is prepared for the clarification of the term by the references in verses 37 and 39 to "unrighteousness" and "unrighteous dominion." The term itself ("principles of righteousness") is not clarified in these preparatory verses; only the effects of abandoning the principles of righteousness is clarified. But verses 41-42 provide something of a list of principles of righteousness. That it is indeed the principles of righteousness that one finds in that passage is clear from the way that the beginning of verse 41 frames the list: "No power or influence can or ought to be maintained by virtue of the priesthood...." What is intended here, it seems clear, is again, as in verse 36, to draw a distinction between power and priesthood, to distinguish "the powers of heaven" from "the rights of the priesthood." Drawing on (abbreviated forms of) two of the terms from verse 36, it seems clear that the list that follows in verses 41-42 lay out the "principles of righteous" through which power and influence can and apparently ought to be maintained. They are, in the simple form of a list: persuasion, long-suffering, gentleness and meekness, love unfeigned, kindness, and pure knowledge (this last is expounded on a bit in verse 42). The meaning of the third term from verse 36 is thus quite straightforward.
With the terms clarified, what is verse 36 actually saying about the relationships among these three terms? First, quite clearly, it is a question of distinguishing the first two terms. It would seem, then, that those who, according to verse 35, "do not learn this one lesson" make the mistake of conflating "the rights of the priesthood" with "the powers of heaven," of taking the right to officiate or to preside as being equivalent to having access to supernatural assistance (or assistants). It apparently must be made clear, here, that there is a radical break between the right to lead and the ability to wield power: governance and power must be completely uncoupled. The second point being made here, it seems, is that power can in fact be wielded, but that it can only be wielded through the principles of righteousness—regardless, apparently, of whether one holds the rights of the priesthood or not.
But if all this, with so much terminological clarification, seems straightforward enough, it is perhaps complicated to some degree by the introduction, in verse 37, of the term "authority."
  • D&C 121:38: Kick against the pricks. Spencer W. Kimball, in the April 1955 Conference Report, explains this phrase thus: "A goad is defined as a spear or a sharp pointed stick used to sting or prig. The burro who kicks the sharp instrument with which he is being prodded is kicking at the pricks. His retaliation does little damage to the sharp stick or to him who wields it but brings distress to the foot that kicks it."
  • D&C 121:41: No power or influence. One might interpret the beginning of verse 41 as telling us that the priesthood should not be used to maintain power or influence of any kind. In that case the list starting "only by persuasion" would be a list of ways that power or influence ought to be maintained—in lieu of doing so by virtue of the priesthood. Alternately, one could interpret the only here as meaning something like except. In that case the list which begins "only by persuasion" is a list of legitimate ways that the priesthood can maintain power and influence. The difference between these two interpretations is significant in how we look at the role of the priesthood. Should neither power nor influence ever be maintained by virtue of the priesthood? (The first interpretation.) Or, is it part of the legitimate role of the priesthood to maintain power and influence but it must do so only in the prescribed ways listed? (The second interpretation.)
Under either interpretation the most significant point of these verses remains the same—someone who holds the priesthood must seek to influence others through love, persuasion, kindness etc. Reproving others should be done early and only when moved on by the Holy Ghost.
  • D&C 121:41: Only by... This phrase, continuing in the subsequent verses, marks the beginning of a list of how one can (and ought?) to maintain "power or influence." It is important to note that this passage is connected 2 Cor 6:1-13, not only in spirit but on the linguistic level.
  • D&C 121:43: Betimes. Although this word is often taken to mean something like "from time to time," it actually means "early" or "in good season or time" (see Webster's 1828 definition here). This word is used in several other passages in the KJV listed here.
  • D&C 121:45: Confidence. The 1847 New Dictionary of the English Language defines confidences as "To have or place faith or trust in; to credit or give credit; to trust or believe, to be secure or assured, to rely or depend upon; to be firmly, boldly secure" (by Charles Richardson, 1847). This is in-line with the three definitions given in Oxford English Dictionary (OED):
  • The mental attitude of trusting in or relying on a person or thing; firm trust, reliance, faith. Const. in (to, on, upon).
  • The feeling sure or certain of a fact or issue; assurance, certitude; assured expectation.
  • Assurance, boldness, fearlessness, arising from reliance (on oneself, on circumstances, on divine support, etc.)
  • D&C 121:45: Virtue. The Webster's 1828 Dictionary provides ten different definitions of virtue, including strength, bravery, moral goodness, acting power, excellence. In the New Testament, virtue is most often the English translation of the Greek Arete, which conveys a sense of excellence or goodness associated with reaching your utmost potential. This usage is found in Philip 4:8, 1 Pet 2:9 where it is translated as "praises", and 2 Pet 1:3-2 Pet 1:5. Virtue is twice used as the English translation of the Greek Dunamis, which refers to strength, power, and ability (Mark 5:30, Luke 6:19). If Joseph Smith or the Lord is referring to either of these senses of the word "virtue," then its use here has more to do with power, strength, and reaching noble potential, rather than merely chaste or pure sentiments. This reading may be further supported by the very similar usage of virtue (arete) in Philip 4:8--where we are commanded to "think on" virtue (arete).
  • D&C 121:45: Bowels full of charity. If we are "full of charity" then there can be no place in us for ill-feelings. Only the best of feelings should exist between us. This is how we need to feel in order to pray and be confident in the presence of God.
Doctrine distil...as the dews. This reference echoes Deut 32:2, where Moses states that his "doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew." This metaphor is not entirely clear. It may imply that the Spirit will teach us slowly and almost imperceptibly, perhaps without our fully realizing or noticing it. This may be a parallel to what happens in the next verse—with knowledge perhaps drawn to us "without compulsory means" to "flow unto" us forever and ever, as our dominion is described in verse 46.
Thy confidence wax strong. In verse 45 we are told that if we are full of charity toward all men and "let virtue garnish [our] thoughts unceasingly" then our confidence will "wax strong in the presence of God." One way we can understand confidence here is to mean "assurance, boldness, fearlessness" as suggested in the 3rd definition given by the OED (see the lexical notes above). This interpretation can explain Jared's boldness in Ether 3:10. Though the Brother of Jared was struck with fear when he first sees the Lord (when he sees just His finger Ether 3:6), in verse 10 the Brother of Jared shows confidence (when he says "Lord, show thyself unto me"). Reading confidence here as "assurance, boldness, fearlessness," suggests interpreting the Brother of Jared's boldness here as the result of his righteousness—that he was charitable and virtuous.
We can also understand this confidence in the presence of the Lord by understanding what happens in the reverse case. Just as the scriptures tell us that those who have virtuous thoughts will have confidence in the Lord's presence, so they also tells us that those without virtuous thoughts will not have confidence in the presence of God. For example, Alma 12:14 specifically makes the connection between thoughts that condemn us and wanting to hide from the presence of the Lord.
  • D&C 121:46: Scepter. The phrase "scepter of righteousness" only occurs once in the New Testament at Heb 1:8, where it refers to the scepter of God's kingdom. Scepter there is an English translation of the Greek rhabdos, which is elsewhere translated as a rod or staff--including the Lord's "rod of iron" mentioned in Rev 2:27, Rev 12:5, and Rev 19:15.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This heading is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from setting our hearts upon the things of the world?
  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from aspiring to the honors of men both in the church, and out of the church?
  • D&C 121:44: What does it mean to have faithfulness "stronger than the cords of death"? Why is it important for others to see that faithfulness?
  • D&C 121:45: What is the "doctrine of the priesthood?"
  • D&C 121:45: Does this doctrine differ from the doctrine of the gospel? Is it a subset? A superset?
  • D&C 121:45: What definition of "virtue" might be most applicable in this verse? Is there more involved here then just having pure thoughts?

Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 121:45. Elder Bruce R. McConkie specifically addresses the question "What is the doctrine of the priesthood?" in his April 1982 General Conference address titled Doctrine of the Priesthood.
  • D&C 121:45. Elaine S. Dalton, "Look toward Eternity!," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 31–32. Speaking of the importance of purity upon confidence, Sister Dalton said "we can confidently enter the holy temples of God with a knowledge that we are worthy to go where the Lord Himself goes. When we are worthy, we can not only enter the temple, the temple can enter us."
  • D&C 121:45. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon states: "It is significant that after inviting us to have charity toward 'all men,' the Lord added the phrase 'and to the household of faith...' Consider the implications when this added phrase is understood to mean more specifically 'your very own household of faith.' Unfortunately, there are a few within the Church who exhibit greater charity toward non-family members than toward their own spouses and children, siblings and parents. They may show feigned kindness publicly while privately sowing and cultivating seeds of contention, demeaning those who should be closest to them. These things should not be."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 121:1-33                      Next page: Verses 122:1-9

D&C 121:41-46

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this headng. →

Discussion[edit]

This heading is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 121:36. This verse employs three distinct terms, the relationships among which need to be sorted out carefully: "the rights of the priesthood," "the powers of heaven," and "the principles of righteousness." The two of these terms ("rights" and "powers") are described as being "inseparably connected," while the second and third of these terms ("powers" and "principles" have a more complex relationship, the one ("principles") being a necessary condition for the other ("powers") to be "controlled" or "handled." What is at work in this complex of terms and relationships?
As for the term "rights of the priesthood," it should be noted that the language of "rights" only began to be associated with the priesthood, at least in revelation, in 1835—both in a revelation received that year (D&C 107) and in revisions of a revelation that had been received earlier (D&C 68). It would not be inappropriate to draw a connection between this development and the reception (in December of 1832) of the revelation that is now D&C 86, particularly verses 8-11, where the Saints were, for the first time, informed that they—or at least some of them—were direct descendants of those who had held authority anciently, making them "legal heirs" (cf. D&C 107:40). Of course, the language of "the rights of the priesthood" seldom refers to the right to the priesthood, but much more often refers to the rights of the priesthood, the rights conferred on one through the priesthood. Exemplary are the many references in section 107. Whereas earlier revelations (particularly D&C 20) had made reference first and foremost to the duties of the several offices of the priesthood, this revelation outlined the rights of those same offices (see especially verses 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12). In the end, it seems best to understand the "rights of the priesthood" here in section 121 in this latter manner: in question are the rights the priesthood itself bestows. And, if section 107 is the point of reference for making sense of what is meant by the priesthood's "rights," it seems that what is meant is the right specifically to officiate and to preside.
What, then, of the "powers of heaven"? The phrase is relatively rare in scripture. It's only biblical appearance is in Luke 21:26, though it appears also in Joseph Smith's revision of Matthew 24. In these two texts, the "powers of heaven" are shaken during the eschatological events surrounding the second coming of Christ, and in both cases the shaking of the powers in question is closely associated with the darkening of the sun and the moon, as well as the falling of the stars. The phrase appears three times in the Book of Mormon, all three of these in Third Nephi and on the lips of the Savior: 3 Ne 20:22; 21:25; and 28:7. (Note that the second of these references reads "power of heaven" rather than "powers of heaven" in the current edition. Royal Skousen's Earliest Text, however, provides the reading of "powers of heaven" for this text, bringing it into conformity with the other two references.) In Third Nephi, the phrase always appears in the context of the announcement of Christ's coming to Israel, accompanied by "the powers of heaven." In at least one of these references, it almost seems that "the powers of heaven" refers to actual persons (or angels?) who will accompany Christ to earth. This may be confirmed in Moses 7:27, where the phrase seems again to be a title for angels. At any rate, it seems best to understand the phrase as referring to "supernatural"—and even personal—assistance (or assistants). (Another reference, of no particular help, can be found in D&C 84:119.)
Finally, what is meant by "the principles of righteousness"? Interestingly, this passage marks the only appearance of this phrase in scripture. However, it is perhaps relatively easy to interpret, given that section 121 itself goes on to clarify it—something it does not do with the other terms here under consideration. The key comes only in verses 41-42. Before that, the reader is prepared for the clarification of the term by the references in verses 37 and 39 to "unrighteousness" and "unrighteous dominion." The term itself ("principles of righteousness") is not clarified in these preparatory verses; only the effects of abandoning the principles of righteousness is clarified. But verses 41-42 provide something of a list of principles of righteousness. That it is indeed the principles of righteousness that one finds in that passage is clear from the way that the beginning of verse 41 frames the list: "No power or influence can or ought to be maintained by virtue of the priesthood...." What is intended here, it seems clear, is again, as in verse 36, to draw a distinction between power and priesthood, to distinguish "the powers of heaven" from "the rights of the priesthood." Drawing on (abbreviated forms of) two of the terms from verse 36, it seems clear that the list that follows in verses 41-42 lay out the "principles of righteous" through which power and influence can and apparently ought to be maintained. They are, in the simple form of a list: persuasion, long-suffering, gentleness and meekness, love unfeigned, kindness, and pure knowledge (this last is expounded on a bit in verse 42). The meaning of the third term from verse 36 is thus quite straightforward.
With the terms clarified, what is verse 36 actually saying about the relationships among these three terms? First, quite clearly, it is a question of distinguishing the first two terms. It would seem, then, that those who, according to verse 35, "do not learn this one lesson" make the mistake of conflating "the rights of the priesthood" with "the powers of heaven," of taking the right to officiate or to preside as being equivalent to having access to supernatural assistance (or assistants). It apparently must be made clear, here, that there is a radical break between the right to lead and the ability to wield power: governance and power must be completely uncoupled. The second point being made here, it seems, is that power can in fact be wielded, but that it can only be wielded through the principles of righteousness—regardless, apparently, of whether one holds the rights of the priesthood or not.
But if all this, with so much terminological clarification, seems straightforward enough, it is perhaps complicated to some degree by the introduction, in verse 37, of the term "authority."
  • D&C 121:38: Kick against the pricks. Spencer W. Kimball, in the April 1955 Conference Report, explains this phrase thus: "A goad is defined as a spear or a sharp pointed stick used to sting or prig. The burro who kicks the sharp instrument with which he is being prodded is kicking at the pricks. His retaliation does little damage to the sharp stick or to him who wields it but brings distress to the foot that kicks it."
  • D&C 121:41: No power or influence. One might interpret the beginning of verse 41 as telling us that the priesthood should not be used to maintain power or influence of any kind. In that case the list starting "only by persuasion" would be a list of ways that power or influence ought to be maintained—in lieu of doing so by virtue of the priesthood. Alternately, one could interpret the only here as meaning something like except. In that case the list which begins "only by persuasion" is a list of legitimate ways that the priesthood can maintain power and influence. The difference between these two interpretations is significant in how we look at the role of the priesthood. Should neither power nor influence ever be maintained by virtue of the priesthood? (The first interpretation.) Or, is it part of the legitimate role of the priesthood to maintain power and influence but it must do so only in the prescribed ways listed? (The second interpretation.)
Under either interpretation the most significant point of these verses remains the same—someone who holds the priesthood must seek to influence others through love, persuasion, kindness etc. Reproving others should be done early and only when moved on by the Holy Ghost.
  • D&C 121:41: Only by... This phrase, continuing in the subsequent verses, marks the beginning of a list of how one can (and ought?) to maintain "power or influence." It is important to note that this passage is connected 2 Cor 6:1-13, not only in spirit but on the linguistic level.
  • D&C 121:43: Betimes. Although this word is often taken to mean something like "from time to time," it actually means "early" or "in good season or time" (see Webster's 1828 definition here). This word is used in several other passages in the KJV listed here.
  • D&C 121:45: Confidence. The 1847 New Dictionary of the English Language defines confidences as "To have or place faith or trust in; to credit or give credit; to trust or believe, to be secure or assured, to rely or depend upon; to be firmly, boldly secure" (by Charles Richardson, 1847). This is in-line with the three definitions given in Oxford English Dictionary (OED):
  • The mental attitude of trusting in or relying on a person or thing; firm trust, reliance, faith. Const. in (to, on, upon).
  • The feeling sure or certain of a fact or issue; assurance, certitude; assured expectation.
  • Assurance, boldness, fearlessness, arising from reliance (on oneself, on circumstances, on divine support, etc.)
  • D&C 121:45: Virtue. The Webster's 1828 Dictionary provides ten different definitions of virtue, including strength, bravery, moral goodness, acting power, excellence. In the New Testament, virtue is most often the English translation of the Greek Arete, which conveys a sense of excellence or goodness associated with reaching your utmost potential. This usage is found in Philip 4:8, 1 Pet 2:9 where it is translated as "praises", and 2 Pet 1:3-2 Pet 1:5. Virtue is twice used as the English translation of the Greek Dunamis, which refers to strength, power, and ability (Mark 5:30, Luke 6:19). If Joseph Smith or the Lord is referring to either of these senses of the word "virtue," then its use here has more to do with power, strength, and reaching noble potential, rather than merely chaste or pure sentiments. This reading may be further supported by the very similar usage of virtue (arete) in Philip 4:8--where we are commanded to "think on" virtue (arete).
  • D&C 121:45: Bowels full of charity. If we are "full of charity" then there can be no place in us for ill-feelings. Only the best of feelings should exist between us. This is how we need to feel in order to pray and be confident in the presence of God.
Doctrine distil...as the dews. This reference echoes Deut 32:2, where Moses states that his "doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew." This metaphor is not entirely clear. It may imply that the Spirit will teach us slowly and almost imperceptibly, perhaps without our fully realizing or noticing it. This may be a parallel to what happens in the next verse—with knowledge perhaps drawn to us "without compulsory means" to "flow unto" us forever and ever, as our dominion is described in verse 46.
Thy confidence wax strong. In verse 45 we are told that if we are full of charity toward all men and "let virtue garnish [our] thoughts unceasingly" then our confidence will "wax strong in the presence of God." One way we can understand confidence here is to mean "assurance, boldness, fearlessness" as suggested in the 3rd definition given by the OED (see the lexical notes above). This interpretation can explain Jared's boldness in Ether 3:10. Though the Brother of Jared was struck with fear when he first sees the Lord (when he sees just His finger Ether 3:6), in verse 10 the Brother of Jared shows confidence (when he says "Lord, show thyself unto me"). Reading confidence here as "assurance, boldness, fearlessness," suggests interpreting the Brother of Jared's boldness here as the result of his righteousness—that he was charitable and virtuous.
We can also understand this confidence in the presence of the Lord by understanding what happens in the reverse case. Just as the scriptures tell us that those who have virtuous thoughts will have confidence in the Lord's presence, so they also tells us that those without virtuous thoughts will not have confidence in the presence of God. For example, Alma 12:14 specifically makes the connection between thoughts that condemn us and wanting to hide from the presence of the Lord.
  • D&C 121:46: Scepter. The phrase "scepter of righteousness" only occurs once in the New Testament at Heb 1:8, where it refers to the scepter of God's kingdom. Scepter there is an English translation of the Greek rhabdos, which is elsewhere translated as a rod or staff--including the Lord's "rod of iron" mentioned in Rev 2:27, Rev 12:5, and Rev 19:15.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This heading is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from setting our hearts upon the things of the world?
  • D&C 121:35: How do we guard ourselves from aspiring to the honors of men both in the church, and out of the church?
  • D&C 121:44: What does it mean to have faithfulness "stronger than the cords of death"? Why is it important for others to see that faithfulness?
  • D&C 121:45: What is the "doctrine of the priesthood?"
  • D&C 121:45: Does this doctrine differ from the doctrine of the gospel? Is it a subset? A superset?
  • D&C 121:45: What definition of "virtue" might be most applicable in this verse? Is there more involved here then just having pure thoughts?

Resources[edit]

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  • D&C 121:45. Elder Bruce R. McConkie specifically addresses the question "What is the doctrine of the priesthood?" in his April 1982 General Conference address titled Doctrine of the Priesthood.
  • D&C 121:45. Elaine S. Dalton, "Look toward Eternity!," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 31–32. Speaking of the importance of purity upon confidence, Sister Dalton said "we can confidently enter the holy temples of God with a knowledge that we are worthy to go where the Lord Himself goes. When we are worthy, we can not only enter the temple, the temple can enter us."
  • D&C 121:45. Craig A. Cardon, "Moving Closer to Him," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 94–96. Elder Cardon states: "It is significant that after inviting us to have charity toward 'all men,' the Lord added the phrase 'and to the household of faith...' Consider the implications when this added phrase is understood to mean more specifically 'your very own household of faith.' Unfortunately, there are a few within the Church who exhibit greater charity toward non-family members than toward their own spouses and children, siblings and parents. They may show feigned kindness publicly while privately sowing and cultivating seeds of contention, demeaning those who should be closest to them. These things should not be."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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