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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


D&C 27:16-18

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 27
Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 26
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 28

For a brief overview of D&C 27 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 5 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 6.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-5: Wine and water. In verse 2 the Lord says it doesn't matter what we drink when we take the sacrament as long as we partake of the sacrament in the right way. This instruction prepares the way for verse 3 and 4 where the saints are told not to use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. The connection between verses 2 and 4 goes something like this:
Alcoholic wine is what has been traditionally used for the sacrament but you don't have to use that. What matters isn't what you drink but how you drink it. Don't use alcoholic wine or even new wine unless you make it yourself.
Note that verse 2 doesn't explain why the saints shouldn't use alcoholic wine for the sacrament. It only offers an explanation for why not doing so is morally acceptable. We can try to understand the reasons though, by reading this section of scripture carefully. One possible reason is suggested by verse 3. In verse 3 the saints are prohibited from buying wine or strong drink from their enemies. The fact that this prohibition comes directly before the commandment not to drink wine that isn't of their own making suggests that part of the reason for the commandments of verse 4 is that their enemies could harm the saints by selling them wine, e.g. poison the saints by selling them poisoned wine. However, this doesn't seem to be the complete story. As we will see, verses 5 and beyond are connected with the earlier verses in a way that suggests that there is more reason for the command than to protect them from poison.
Consider verse 5. After saying "marvel not" the Lord says "for the hour cometh that I will drink of the fruit of the vine with you on the earth." Then He goes on to list, throughout the rest of the chapter, who else the Lord will drink with. The structure "marvel not for ..." suggests that the Lord is about to tell us something that in some way diminishes our surprise or difficulty in understanding the commandment. So how does telling His audience that one day the He will drink of the fruit of the vine with that audience diminish in any way their surprise or difficulty in understanding the command not to drink alcoholic wine for the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5: Symbolism of the Sacrament. By using the phrase "the fruit of the vine" the Lord makes reference to the Last Supper where he says that he will not drink of the fruit of the vine "until the day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom." (Matt 26:29, see also Mark 14:25; Luke 22:18).
  • D&C 27:6-7: Gabriel. In Luke 1:19, the angel appearing to Zacharias identifies himself as Gabriel. So Elias is another name or title (see the Bible Dictionary entry on Elias) given to Gabriel. If both references to Elias in verses 6 and 7 of section 27 refer to the same person, then verse six gives us additional information about Gabriel and his role. According to HC 3:386, Gabriel is also Noah, the biblical patriarch.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 27:2-4. Why do we use water in the sacrament? What else could we use?
  • D&C 27:4. Is the command here not to partake of wine (except new wine of their own making) at any time or is this command limited to when they are partaking of the sacrament?
  • D&C 27:5. Why does the Lord say here "marvel not"? Is there some part of what the Lord has said (verses 1-4) that might cause some to marvel? What part?
  • D&C 27:5. What is Moroni’s particular authority?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 27 is __.
  • D&C 27 was first published in __.
  • D&C 27 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 27.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 26                         Next section: D&C 28

D&C 29:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 29
Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 28
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 30

For a brief overview of D&C 29 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Atone. The word “atone” is an interesting English word, coming into English rather late (late 16th century), when it replaced the earlier verb “to one,” in other words “to join or unite.” (But “to one” was also not particularly old, first showing up in the 14th century.) In the King James translation of the Old Testament, the word “atonement” usually translates the Hebrew word kaphar, also translated “reconciliation,” “pacification,” “mercy,” “purging,” “cleansing,” and so on. In the New Testament (where the word occurs only once–Romans 5:11) it translates the Greek word katallage: “reconciliation,” “exchange.”
  • D&C 29:5: Advocate. The Latin roots of “advocate” are suggestive: ad ("to") + vocare ("call"). An advocate is one who has been called to speak for someone.
  • D&C 29:22: When men again begin to deny their God. See the discussion of this passage and related concepts at 1 Ne 22:26.
  • D&C 29:32: Spiritual and physical creations. This verse and surrounding passages seem closely related to 1 Cor 15:45-46. There, Paul writes about two Adam's, the first as "a living soul" and the second as "a quickening spirit." If the first Adam is taken as temporal/historical, and the second Adam as spiritual/liturgical, then this suggests suggests parallels with the Adam who fell and brought about temporal creation (as related in Gen 2) and Christ who brought about spiritual creation (with parallels to Genesis 1, which might be read as the pre-fallen and post-atonement state of things).
If this sketches how Joseph would've read the first natural/temporal then spiritual of 1 Cor 15:46, then perhaps the four spiritual-temporal chiastic events described here might be read as follows:
(1) The first spiritual creation corresponds to the pre-history, pre-mortal, pre-temporal order of things.
(2) The first temporal creation is the fall, the beginning of history, the giving and breaking of the commandment in the Garden of Eden. (It seems that D&C 29 does not really address these first two creations which are described in Genesis 1-2, Moses, and Abraham.)
(3) The second temporal creation corresponds to physical gathering of Israel, eschatological judgment, and physical resurrection (the Rapture?). This is what seems to be described in vv. 1-22.
(4) The second spiritual creation is Final Judgment described in vv. 27-29 (though possibly starting with the "old things shall pass away and all things shall become new" bit starting in v. 23).
Note also that this outline puts Christ's life and atonal suffering in between these two doubled creation events---that is, in the "meridian of time" as several passages in the D&C and Moses phrase it.
  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. In Hebrews, Paul says that God created the earth through the power of faith. (Heb. 11:3). But in scriptures received through the Restoration, God’s power is described as honor.
The clearest statement is in D&C 29:36. This passage recounts that in premortality Satan 'rebelled against me, saying, Give me thine honor, which is my power; ...' This passage equates honor and power, just as in the phrase 'Shakespeare, the great English playwright, ...' This concept is also found in Moses 4:1-4, received three months earlier as part of the Joseph Smith Translation. Verse 1 recounts that Satan claimed he could save everyone in mortality, 'wherefore give me thine honor.' Verse 3 says 'Wherefore, because that Satan .. sought ... that I should give unto him mine own power; ...' These two statements makes sense if requesting God’s honor in verse 1 is the same thing as seeking God’s power in verses 3. Both of these passages thus equate God's power with his honor.
Other passages shed light on this concept of honor as power. In Alma 42, Alma says three times in the space of a dozen verses that if God were to act unjustly then he would cease to be God. 'Now the work of justice could not be destroyed; if so, God would cease to be God.' (Alma 42: 13, 22, 25). Thus a necessary element of God’s honor is that he never acts contrary to justice. We also learn that God’s power is dependent upon his honor, suggesting that honor comes first, and then power follows.
This causal relationship between honor and power is also described at the end of Section 121. The instruction against unrighteous dominion in Section 121 includes the explanation that: 'No power ... can ... be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion' and other methods that respect agency. (D&C 121:41-45). The reward for those who learn to govern in this manner includes the following: '... thy scepter [shall be] an unchanging scepter of righteousness and truth; and thy dominion shall be an everlasting dominion, and without compulsory means it shall flow unto thee forever and ever.' (D&C 121:45-56). A reward that includes a scepter of righteousness and an everlasting dominion is exaltation. We thus learn here that another element of the honor that enables an exalted being to rule is respect for agency. We also learn that, just as the power of honor can be lost through dishonor, the power of honor flows naturally to those who do possess honor.
The relationship between honor and power is also illustrated by the experience of Enoch during the vision recounted in Moses 7: 'And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto Enoch, and told Enoch all the doings of the children of men; wherefore Enoch knew, and looked upon their wickedness, and their misery, and wept and stretched forth his arms, and his heart swelled wide as eternity; and his bowels yearned; and all eternity shook.' (Ms. 7:41). All eternity responding to what happens inside the heart of one person sounds like the kind of power that flows without compulsory means to exalted beings who possess honor. It does not say here that Enoch had authority to issue any instructions, or that he tried to do so, but it does sound like Enoch had the power to make things happen. (Also see the Abraham account of the creation in Abr. 4:9-12, 18, 21, 25). We also learn here that a third element of honor is love.
This idea that God’s power derives from his honor helps us to understand what God is (D&C 93:19-20) and what we must also become if we are to be like him. (Mt. 5:48 discussion). One of the ways in which the purpose of mortality can be summarized is that we are here to develop honor. It can also be more powerful to ask oneself, not merely if something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease one's honor.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. Wen faced with a difficult choice, how is our answer different if we ask, not whether something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease our honor.

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Arm. What does the use of “arm” to indicate mercy instead of strength suggest?
  • D&C 29:2: How does the metaphor of this verse compare to that of the previous verse? What does it mean, in this context, to call on the Lord in mighty prayer?
  • D&C 29:4: What does it mean to be chosen “out of the world"? How does that occur?
  • D&C 29:5: What does it mean to say that Christ is in our midst? How is that related to the gathering? How is the fact that he is our advocate with the Father relevant here?
  • D&C 29:5: Why does the Lord describe himself as an advocate?
  • D&C 29:5: Is his advocacy on our behalf related to the Father’s gift of the kingdom? If so, what does it mean to say that giving us that kingdom is the Father’s good will?
  • D&C 29:6: Notice how this verse differs from the same idea expressed in many other scriptures by adding “being united in prayer according to my command.” What is the significance of that addition?
  • D&C 29:6: Where are we commanded to be united in prayer? What does it mean to be united in prayer?
  • D&C 29:6: To whom is this addressed? In other words, who is called to bring the gathering to pass?
  • D&C 29:6: Does this verse define what it means to be elect?
  • D&C 29:8: At the time of this revelation, the gathering was to a particular location. Now it is to any of the stakes. How does that difference change our understanding of what it means to gather together?
  • D&C 29:8: The gathering is “to prepare their hearts.” How does the gathering do that? It is also “to [. . .] be prepared in all things against” the day of tribulation. What is that day?
  • D&C 29:8: How does the gathering prepare us for that day?
  • D&C 29:12: The Twelve which were with me in my ministry at Jerusalem. Who are these twelve? Would Judas Iscariot count as one of these? Might other, subsequent apostles—like Mathias (Acts 1:23-26) and Paul—be included?
  • D&C 29:36: Which is my power. Is this part of the devil's quote or is it God talking again? How does the answer to this question affect the meaning of the verse?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 29 is __.
  • D&C 29 was first published in __.
  • D&C 29 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 29.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30

D&C 29:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 29
Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 28
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 30

For a brief overview of D&C 29 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Atone. The word “atone” is an interesting English word, coming into English rather late (late 16th century), when it replaced the earlier verb “to one,” in other words “to join or unite.” (But “to one” was also not particularly old, first showing up in the 14th century.) In the King James translation of the Old Testament, the word “atonement” usually translates the Hebrew word kaphar, also translated “reconciliation,” “pacification,” “mercy,” “purging,” “cleansing,” and so on. In the New Testament (where the word occurs only once–Romans 5:11) it translates the Greek word katallage: “reconciliation,” “exchange.”
  • D&C 29:5: Advocate. The Latin roots of “advocate” are suggestive: ad ("to") + vocare ("call"). An advocate is one who has been called to speak for someone.
  • D&C 29:22: When men again begin to deny their God. See the discussion of this passage and related concepts at 1 Ne 22:26.
  • D&C 29:32: Spiritual and physical creations. This verse and surrounding passages seem closely related to 1 Cor 15:45-46. There, Paul writes about two Adam's, the first as "a living soul" and the second as "a quickening spirit." If the first Adam is taken as temporal/historical, and the second Adam as spiritual/liturgical, then this suggests suggests parallels with the Adam who fell and brought about temporal creation (as related in Gen 2) and Christ who brought about spiritual creation (with parallels to Genesis 1, which might be read as the pre-fallen and post-atonement state of things).
If this sketches how Joseph would've read the first natural/temporal then spiritual of 1 Cor 15:46, then perhaps the four spiritual-temporal chiastic events described here might be read as follows:
(1) The first spiritual creation corresponds to the pre-history, pre-mortal, pre-temporal order of things.
(2) The first temporal creation is the fall, the beginning of history, the giving and breaking of the commandment in the Garden of Eden. (It seems that D&C 29 does not really address these first two creations which are described in Genesis 1-2, Moses, and Abraham.)
(3) The second temporal creation corresponds to physical gathering of Israel, eschatological judgment, and physical resurrection (the Rapture?). This is what seems to be described in vv. 1-22.
(4) The second spiritual creation is Final Judgment described in vv. 27-29 (though possibly starting with the "old things shall pass away and all things shall become new" bit starting in v. 23).
Note also that this outline puts Christ's life and atonal suffering in between these two doubled creation events---that is, in the "meridian of time" as several passages in the D&C and Moses phrase it.
  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. In Hebrews, Paul says that God created the earth through the power of faith. (Heb. 11:3). But in scriptures received through the Restoration, God’s power is described as honor.
The clearest statement is in D&C 29:36. This passage recounts that in premortality Satan 'rebelled against me, saying, Give me thine honor, which is my power; ...' This passage equates honor and power, just as in the phrase 'Shakespeare, the great English playwright, ...' This concept is also found in Moses 4:1-4, received three months earlier as part of the Joseph Smith Translation. Verse 1 recounts that Satan claimed he could save everyone in mortality, 'wherefore give me thine honor.' Verse 3 says 'Wherefore, because that Satan .. sought ... that I should give unto him mine own power; ...' These two statements makes sense if requesting God’s honor in verse 1 is the same thing as seeking God’s power in verses 3. Both of these passages thus equate God's power with his honor.
Other passages shed light on this concept of honor as power. In Alma 42, Alma says three times in the space of a dozen verses that if God were to act unjustly then he would cease to be God. 'Now the work of justice could not be destroyed; if so, God would cease to be God.' (Alma 42: 13, 22, 25). Thus a necessary element of God’s honor is that he never acts contrary to justice. We also learn that God’s power is dependent upon his honor, suggesting that honor comes first, and then power follows.
This causal relationship between honor and power is also described at the end of Section 121. The instruction against unrighteous dominion in Section 121 includes the explanation that: 'No power ... can ... be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion' and other methods that respect agency. (D&C 121:41-45). The reward for those who learn to govern in this manner includes the following: '... thy scepter [shall be] an unchanging scepter of righteousness and truth; and thy dominion shall be an everlasting dominion, and without compulsory means it shall flow unto thee forever and ever.' (D&C 121:45-56). A reward that includes a scepter of righteousness and an everlasting dominion is exaltation. We thus learn here that another element of the honor that enables an exalted being to rule is respect for agency. We also learn that, just as the power of honor can be lost through dishonor, the power of honor flows naturally to those who do possess honor.
The relationship between honor and power is also illustrated by the experience of Enoch during the vision recounted in Moses 7: 'And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto Enoch, and told Enoch all the doings of the children of men; wherefore Enoch knew, and looked upon their wickedness, and their misery, and wept and stretched forth his arms, and his heart swelled wide as eternity; and his bowels yearned; and all eternity shook.' (Ms. 7:41). All eternity responding to what happens inside the heart of one person sounds like the kind of power that flows without compulsory means to exalted beings who possess honor. It does not say here that Enoch had authority to issue any instructions, or that he tried to do so, but it does sound like Enoch had the power to make things happen. (Also see the Abraham account of the creation in Abr. 4:9-12, 18, 21, 25). We also learn here that a third element of honor is love.
This idea that God’s power derives from his honor helps us to understand what God is (D&C 93:19-20) and what we must also become if we are to be like him. (Mt. 5:48 discussion). One of the ways in which the purpose of mortality can be summarized is that we are here to develop honor. It can also be more powerful to ask oneself, not merely if something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease one's honor.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. Wen faced with a difficult choice, how is our answer different if we ask, not whether something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease our honor.

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Arm. What does the use of “arm” to indicate mercy instead of strength suggest?
  • D&C 29:2: How does the metaphor of this verse compare to that of the previous verse? What does it mean, in this context, to call on the Lord in mighty prayer?
  • D&C 29:4: What does it mean to be chosen “out of the world"? How does that occur?
  • D&C 29:5: What does it mean to say that Christ is in our midst? How is that related to the gathering? How is the fact that he is our advocate with the Father relevant here?
  • D&C 29:5: Why does the Lord describe himself as an advocate?
  • D&C 29:5: Is his advocacy on our behalf related to the Father’s gift of the kingdom? If so, what does it mean to say that giving us that kingdom is the Father’s good will?
  • D&C 29:6: Notice how this verse differs from the same idea expressed in many other scriptures by adding “being united in prayer according to my command.” What is the significance of that addition?
  • D&C 29:6: Where are we commanded to be united in prayer? What does it mean to be united in prayer?
  • D&C 29:6: To whom is this addressed? In other words, who is called to bring the gathering to pass?
  • D&C 29:6: Does this verse define what it means to be elect?
  • D&C 29:8: At the time of this revelation, the gathering was to a particular location. Now it is to any of the stakes. How does that difference change our understanding of what it means to gather together?
  • D&C 29:8: The gathering is “to prepare their hearts.” How does the gathering do that? It is also “to [. . .] be prepared in all things against” the day of tribulation. What is that day?
  • D&C 29:8: How does the gathering prepare us for that day?
  • D&C 29:12: The Twelve which were with me in my ministry at Jerusalem. Who are these twelve? Would Judas Iscariot count as one of these? Might other, subsequent apostles—like Mathias (Acts 1:23-26) and Paul—be included?
  • D&C 29:36: Which is my power. Is this part of the devil's quote or is it God talking again? How does the answer to this question affect the meaning of the verse?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 29 is __.
  • D&C 29 was first published in __.
  • D&C 29 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 29.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30

D&C 29:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 29
Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 28
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 30

For a brief overview of D&C 29 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Atone. The word “atone” is an interesting English word, coming into English rather late (late 16th century), when it replaced the earlier verb “to one,” in other words “to join or unite.” (But “to one” was also not particularly old, first showing up in the 14th century.) In the King James translation of the Old Testament, the word “atonement” usually translates the Hebrew word kaphar, also translated “reconciliation,” “pacification,” “mercy,” “purging,” “cleansing,” and so on. In the New Testament (where the word occurs only once–Romans 5:11) it translates the Greek word katallage: “reconciliation,” “exchange.”
  • D&C 29:5: Advocate. The Latin roots of “advocate” are suggestive: ad ("to") + vocare ("call"). An advocate is one who has been called to speak for someone.
  • D&C 29:22: When men again begin to deny their God. See the discussion of this passage and related concepts at 1 Ne 22:26.
  • D&C 29:32: Spiritual and physical creations. This verse and surrounding passages seem closely related to 1 Cor 15:45-46. There, Paul writes about two Adam's, the first as "a living soul" and the second as "a quickening spirit." If the first Adam is taken as temporal/historical, and the second Adam as spiritual/liturgical, then this suggests suggests parallels with the Adam who fell and brought about temporal creation (as related in Gen 2) and Christ who brought about spiritual creation (with parallels to Genesis 1, which might be read as the pre-fallen and post-atonement state of things).
If this sketches how Joseph would've read the first natural/temporal then spiritual of 1 Cor 15:46, then perhaps the four spiritual-temporal chiastic events described here might be read as follows:
(1) The first spiritual creation corresponds to the pre-history, pre-mortal, pre-temporal order of things.
(2) The first temporal creation is the fall, the beginning of history, the giving and breaking of the commandment in the Garden of Eden. (It seems that D&C 29 does not really address these first two creations which are described in Genesis 1-2, Moses, and Abraham.)
(3) The second temporal creation corresponds to physical gathering of Israel, eschatological judgment, and physical resurrection (the Rapture?). This is what seems to be described in vv. 1-22.
(4) The second spiritual creation is Final Judgment described in vv. 27-29 (though possibly starting with the "old things shall pass away and all things shall become new" bit starting in v. 23).
Note also that this outline puts Christ's life and atonal suffering in between these two doubled creation events---that is, in the "meridian of time" as several passages in the D&C and Moses phrase it.
  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. In Hebrews, Paul says that God created the earth through the power of faith. (Heb. 11:3). But in scriptures received through the Restoration, God’s power is described as honor.
The clearest statement is in D&C 29:36. This passage recounts that in premortality Satan 'rebelled against me, saying, Give me thine honor, which is my power; ...' This passage equates honor and power, just as in the phrase 'Shakespeare, the great English playwright, ...' This concept is also found in Moses 4:1-4, received three months earlier as part of the Joseph Smith Translation. Verse 1 recounts that Satan claimed he could save everyone in mortality, 'wherefore give me thine honor.' Verse 3 says 'Wherefore, because that Satan .. sought ... that I should give unto him mine own power; ...' These two statements makes sense if requesting God’s honor in verse 1 is the same thing as seeking God’s power in verses 3. Both of these passages thus equate God's power with his honor.
Other passages shed light on this concept of honor as power. In Alma 42, Alma says three times in the space of a dozen verses that if God were to act unjustly then he would cease to be God. 'Now the work of justice could not be destroyed; if so, God would cease to be God.' (Alma 42: 13, 22, 25). Thus a necessary element of God’s honor is that he never acts contrary to justice. We also learn that God’s power is dependent upon his honor, suggesting that honor comes first, and then power follows.
This causal relationship between honor and power is also described at the end of Section 121. The instruction against unrighteous dominion in Section 121 includes the explanation that: 'No power ... can ... be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion' and other methods that respect agency. (D&C 121:41-45). The reward for those who learn to govern in this manner includes the following: '... thy scepter [shall be] an unchanging scepter of righteousness and truth; and thy dominion shall be an everlasting dominion, and without compulsory means it shall flow unto thee forever and ever.' (D&C 121:45-56). A reward that includes a scepter of righteousness and an everlasting dominion is exaltation. We thus learn here that another element of the honor that enables an exalted being to rule is respect for agency. We also learn that, just as the power of honor can be lost through dishonor, the power of honor flows naturally to those who do possess honor.
The relationship between honor and power is also illustrated by the experience of Enoch during the vision recounted in Moses 7: 'And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto Enoch, and told Enoch all the doings of the children of men; wherefore Enoch knew, and looked upon their wickedness, and their misery, and wept and stretched forth his arms, and his heart swelled wide as eternity; and his bowels yearned; and all eternity shook.' (Ms. 7:41). All eternity responding to what happens inside the heart of one person sounds like the kind of power that flows without compulsory means to exalted beings who possess honor. It does not say here that Enoch had authority to issue any instructions, or that he tried to do so, but it does sound like Enoch had the power to make things happen. (Also see the Abraham account of the creation in Abr. 4:9-12, 18, 21, 25). We also learn here that a third element of honor is love.
This idea that God’s power derives from his honor helps us to understand what God is (D&C 93:19-20) and what we must also become if we are to be like him. (Mt. 5:48 discussion). One of the ways in which the purpose of mortality can be summarized is that we are here to develop honor. It can also be more powerful to ask oneself, not merely if something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease one's honor.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. Wen faced with a difficult choice, how is our answer different if we ask, not whether something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease our honor.

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Arm. What does the use of “arm” to indicate mercy instead of strength suggest?
  • D&C 29:2: How does the metaphor of this verse compare to that of the previous verse? What does it mean, in this context, to call on the Lord in mighty prayer?
  • D&C 29:4: What does it mean to be chosen “out of the world"? How does that occur?
  • D&C 29:5: What does it mean to say that Christ is in our midst? How is that related to the gathering? How is the fact that he is our advocate with the Father relevant here?
  • D&C 29:5: Why does the Lord describe himself as an advocate?
  • D&C 29:5: Is his advocacy on our behalf related to the Father’s gift of the kingdom? If so, what does it mean to say that giving us that kingdom is the Father’s good will?
  • D&C 29:6: Notice how this verse differs from the same idea expressed in many other scriptures by adding “being united in prayer according to my command.” What is the significance of that addition?
  • D&C 29:6: Where are we commanded to be united in prayer? What does it mean to be united in prayer?
  • D&C 29:6: To whom is this addressed? In other words, who is called to bring the gathering to pass?
  • D&C 29:6: Does this verse define what it means to be elect?
  • D&C 29:8: At the time of this revelation, the gathering was to a particular location. Now it is to any of the stakes. How does that difference change our understanding of what it means to gather together?
  • D&C 29:8: The gathering is “to prepare their hearts.” How does the gathering do that? It is also “to [. . .] be prepared in all things against” the day of tribulation. What is that day?
  • D&C 29:8: How does the gathering prepare us for that day?
  • D&C 29:12: The Twelve which were with me in my ministry at Jerusalem. Who are these twelve? Would Judas Iscariot count as one of these? Might other, subsequent apostles—like Mathias (Acts 1:23-26) and Paul—be included?
  • D&C 29:36: Which is my power. Is this part of the devil's quote or is it God talking again? How does the answer to this question affect the meaning of the verse?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 29 is __.
  • D&C 29 was first published in __.
  • D&C 29 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 29.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30

D&C 29:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 29
Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 28
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 30

For a brief overview of D&C 29 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Atone. The word “atone” is an interesting English word, coming into English rather late (late 16th century), when it replaced the earlier verb “to one,” in other words “to join or unite.” (But “to one” was also not particularly old, first showing up in the 14th century.) In the King James translation of the Old Testament, the word “atonement” usually translates the Hebrew word kaphar, also translated “reconciliation,” “pacification,” “mercy,” “purging,” “cleansing,” and so on. In the New Testament (where the word occurs only once–Romans 5:11) it translates the Greek word katallage: “reconciliation,” “exchange.”
  • D&C 29:5: Advocate. The Latin roots of “advocate” are suggestive: ad ("to") + vocare ("call"). An advocate is one who has been called to speak for someone.
  • D&C 29:22: When men again begin to deny their God. See the discussion of this passage and related concepts at 1 Ne 22:26.
  • D&C 29:32: Spiritual and physical creations. This verse and surrounding passages seem closely related to 1 Cor 15:45-46. There, Paul writes about two Adam's, the first as "a living soul" and the second as "a quickening spirit." If the first Adam is taken as temporal/historical, and the second Adam as spiritual/liturgical, then this suggests suggests parallels with the Adam who fell and brought about temporal creation (as related in Gen 2) and Christ who brought about spiritual creation (with parallels to Genesis 1, which might be read as the pre-fallen and post-atonement state of things).
If this sketches how Joseph would've read the first natural/temporal then spiritual of 1 Cor 15:46, then perhaps the four spiritual-temporal chiastic events described here might be read as follows:
(1) The first spiritual creation corresponds to the pre-history, pre-mortal, pre-temporal order of things.
(2) The first temporal creation is the fall, the beginning of history, the giving and breaking of the commandment in the Garden of Eden. (It seems that D&C 29 does not really address these first two creations which are described in Genesis 1-2, Moses, and Abraham.)
(3) The second temporal creation corresponds to physical gathering of Israel, eschatological judgment, and physical resurrection (the Rapture?). This is what seems to be described in vv. 1-22.
(4) The second spiritual creation is Final Judgment described in vv. 27-29 (though possibly starting with the "old things shall pass away and all things shall become new" bit starting in v. 23).
Note also that this outline puts Christ's life and atonal suffering in between these two doubled creation events---that is, in the "meridian of time" as several passages in the D&C and Moses phrase it.
  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. In Hebrews, Paul says that God created the earth through the power of faith. (Heb. 11:3). But in scriptures received through the Restoration, God’s power is described as honor.
The clearest statement is in D&C 29:36. This passage recounts that in premortality Satan 'rebelled against me, saying, Give me thine honor, which is my power; ...' This passage equates honor and power, just as in the phrase 'Shakespeare, the great English playwright, ...' This concept is also found in Moses 4:1-4, received three months earlier as part of the Joseph Smith Translation. Verse 1 recounts that Satan claimed he could save everyone in mortality, 'wherefore give me thine honor.' Verse 3 says 'Wherefore, because that Satan .. sought ... that I should give unto him mine own power; ...' These two statements makes sense if requesting God’s honor in verse 1 is the same thing as seeking God’s power in verses 3. Both of these passages thus equate God's power with his honor.
Other passages shed light on this concept of honor as power. In Alma 42, Alma says three times in the space of a dozen verses that if God were to act unjustly then he would cease to be God. 'Now the work of justice could not be destroyed; if so, God would cease to be God.' (Alma 42: 13, 22, 25). Thus a necessary element of God’s honor is that he never acts contrary to justice. We also learn that God’s power is dependent upon his honor, suggesting that honor comes first, and then power follows.
This causal relationship between honor and power is also described at the end of Section 121. The instruction against unrighteous dominion in Section 121 includes the explanation that: 'No power ... can ... be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion' and other methods that respect agency. (D&C 121:41-45). The reward for those who learn to govern in this manner includes the following: '... thy scepter [shall be] an unchanging scepter of righteousness and truth; and thy dominion shall be an everlasting dominion, and without compulsory means it shall flow unto thee forever and ever.' (D&C 121:45-56). A reward that includes a scepter of righteousness and an everlasting dominion is exaltation. We thus learn here that another element of the honor that enables an exalted being to rule is respect for agency. We also learn that, just as the power of honor can be lost through dishonor, the power of honor flows naturally to those who do possess honor.
The relationship between honor and power is also illustrated by the experience of Enoch during the vision recounted in Moses 7: 'And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto Enoch, and told Enoch all the doings of the children of men; wherefore Enoch knew, and looked upon their wickedness, and their misery, and wept and stretched forth his arms, and his heart swelled wide as eternity; and his bowels yearned; and all eternity shook.' (Ms. 7:41). All eternity responding to what happens inside the heart of one person sounds like the kind of power that flows without compulsory means to exalted beings who possess honor. It does not say here that Enoch had authority to issue any instructions, or that he tried to do so, but it does sound like Enoch had the power to make things happen. (Also see the Abraham account of the creation in Abr. 4:9-12, 18, 21, 25). We also learn here that a third element of honor is love.
This idea that God’s power derives from his honor helps us to understand what God is (D&C 93:19-20) and what we must also become if we are to be like him. (Mt. 5:48 discussion). One of the ways in which the purpose of mortality can be summarized is that we are here to develop honor. It can also be more powerful to ask oneself, not merely if something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease one's honor.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. Wen faced with a difficult choice, how is our answer different if we ask, not whether something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease our honor.

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Arm. What does the use of “arm” to indicate mercy instead of strength suggest?
  • D&C 29:2: How does the metaphor of this verse compare to that of the previous verse? What does it mean, in this context, to call on the Lord in mighty prayer?
  • D&C 29:4: What does it mean to be chosen “out of the world"? How does that occur?
  • D&C 29:5: What does it mean to say that Christ is in our midst? How is that related to the gathering? How is the fact that he is our advocate with the Father relevant here?
  • D&C 29:5: Why does the Lord describe himself as an advocate?
  • D&C 29:5: Is his advocacy on our behalf related to the Father’s gift of the kingdom? If so, what does it mean to say that giving us that kingdom is the Father’s good will?
  • D&C 29:6: Notice how this verse differs from the same idea expressed in many other scriptures by adding “being united in prayer according to my command.” What is the significance of that addition?
  • D&C 29:6: Where are we commanded to be united in prayer? What does it mean to be united in prayer?
  • D&C 29:6: To whom is this addressed? In other words, who is called to bring the gathering to pass?
  • D&C 29:6: Does this verse define what it means to be elect?
  • D&C 29:8: At the time of this revelation, the gathering was to a particular location. Now it is to any of the stakes. How does that difference change our understanding of what it means to gather together?
  • D&C 29:8: The gathering is “to prepare their hearts.” How does the gathering do that? It is also “to [. . .] be prepared in all things against” the day of tribulation. What is that day?
  • D&C 29:8: How does the gathering prepare us for that day?
  • D&C 29:12: The Twelve which were with me in my ministry at Jerusalem. Who are these twelve? Would Judas Iscariot count as one of these? Might other, subsequent apostles—like Mathias (Acts 1:23-26) and Paul—be included?
  • D&C 29:36: Which is my power. Is this part of the devil's quote or is it God talking again? How does the answer to this question affect the meaning of the verse?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 29 is __.
  • D&C 29 was first published in __.
  • D&C 29 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 29.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30

D&C 29:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 29
Previous section: D&C 28                         Next section: D&C 30


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 28
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 30

For a brief overview of D&C 29 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 29:1: Atone. The word “atone” is an interesting English word, coming into English rather late (late 16th century), when it replaced the earlier verb “to one,” in other words “to join or unite.” (But “to one” was also not particularly old, first showing up in the 14th century.) In the King James translation of the Old Testament, the word “atonement” usually translates the Hebrew word kaphar, also translated “reconciliation,” “pacification,” “mercy,” “purging,” “cleansing,” and so on. In the New Testament (where the word occurs only once–Romans 5:11) it translates the Greek word katallage: “reconciliation,” “exchange.”
  • D&C 29:5: Advocate. The Latin roots of “advocate” are suggestive: ad ("to") + vocare ("call"). An advocate is one who has been called to speak for someone.
  • D&C 29:22: When men again begin to deny their God. See the discussion of this passage and related concepts at 1 Ne 22:26.
  • D&C 29:32: Spiritual and physical creations. This verse and surrounding passages seem closely related to 1 Cor 15:45-46. There, Paul writes about two Adam's, the first as "a living soul" and the second as "a quickening spirit." If the first Adam is taken as temporal/historical, and the second Adam as spiritual/liturgical, then this suggests suggests parallels with the Adam who fell and brought about temporal creation (as related in Gen 2) and Christ who brought about spiritual creation (with parallels to Genesis 1, which might be read as the pre-fallen and post-atonement state of things).
If this sketches how Joseph would've read the first natural/temporal then spiritual of 1 Cor 15:46, then perhaps the four spiritual-temporal chiastic events described here might be read as follows:
(1) The first spiritual creation corresponds to the pre-history, pre-mortal, pre-temporal order of things.
(2) The first temporal creation is the fall, the beginning of history, the giving and breaking of the commandment in the Garden of Eden. (It seems that D&C 29 does not really address these first two creations which are described in Genesis 1-2, Moses, and Abraham.)
(3) The second temporal creation corresponds to physical gathering of Israel, eschatological judgment, and physical resurrection (the Rapture?). This is what seems to be described in vv. 1-22.
(4) The second spiritual creation is Final Judgment described in vv. 27-29 (though possibly starting with the "old things shall pass away and all things shall become new" bit starting in v. 23).
Note also that this outline puts Christ's life and atonal suffering in between these two doubled creation events---that is, in the "meridian of time" as several passages in the D&C and Moses phrase it.
  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. In Hebrews, Paul says that God created the earth through the power of faith. (Heb. 11:3). But in scriptures received through the Restoration, God’s power is described as honor.
The clearest statement is in D&C 29:36. This passage recounts that in premortality Satan 'rebelled against me, saying, Give me thine honor, which is my power; ...' This passage equates honor and power, just as in the phrase 'Shakespeare, the great English playwright, ...' This concept is also found in Moses 4:1-4, received three months earlier as part of the Joseph Smith Translation. Verse 1 recounts that Satan claimed he could save everyone in mortality, 'wherefore give me thine honor.' Verse 3 says 'Wherefore, because that Satan .. sought ... that I should give unto him mine own power; ...' These two statements makes sense if requesting God’s honor in verse 1 is the same thing as seeking God’s power in verses 3. Both of these passages thus equate God's power with his honor.
Other passages shed light on this concept of honor as power. In Alma 42, Alma says three times in the space of a dozen verses that if God were to act unjustly then he would cease to be God. 'Now the work of justice could not be destroyed; if so, God would cease to be God.' (Alma 42: 13, 22, 25). Thus a necessary element of God’s honor is that he never acts contrary to justice. We also learn that God’s power is dependent upon his honor, suggesting that honor comes first, and then power follows.
This causal relationship between honor and power is also described at the end of Section 121. The instruction against unrighteous dominion in Section 121 includes the explanation that: 'No power ... can ... be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion' and other methods that respect agency. (D&C 121:41-45). The reward for those who learn to govern in this manner includes the following: '... thy scepter [shall be] an unchanging scepter of righteousness and truth; and thy dominion shall be an everlasting dominion, and without compulsory means it shall flow unto thee forever and ever.' (D&C 121:45-56). A reward that includes a scepter of righteousness and an everlasting dominion is exaltation. We thus learn here that another element of the honor that enables an exalted being to rule is respect for agency. We also learn that, just as the power of honor can be lost through dishonor, the power of honor flows naturally to those who do possess honor.
The relationship between honor and power is also illustrated by the experience of Enoch during the vision recounted in Moses 7: 'And it came to pass that the Lord spake unto Enoch, and told Enoch all the doings of the children of men; wherefore Enoch knew, and looked upon their wickedness, and their misery, and wept and stretched forth his arms, and his heart swelled wide as eternity; and his bowels yearned; and all eternity shook.' (Ms. 7:41). All eternity responding to what happens inside the heart of one person sounds like the kind of power that flows without compulsory means to exalted beings who possess honor. It does not say here that Enoch had authority to issue any instructions, or that he tried to do so, but it does sound like Enoch had the power to make things happen. (Also see the Abraham account of the creation in Abr. 4:9-12, 18, 21, 25). We also learn here that a third element of honor is love.
This idea that God’s power derives from his honor helps us to understand what God is (D&C 93:19-20) and what we must also become if we are to be like him. (Mt. 5:48 discussion). One of the ways in which the purpose of mortality can be summarized is that we are here to develop honor. It can also be more powerful to ask oneself, not merely if something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease one's honor.

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  • D&C 29:36: Honor as power. Wen faced with a difficult choice, how is our answer different if we ask, not whether something is a sin, but whether it will increase or decrease our honor.

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  • D&C 29:1: Arm. What does the use of “arm” to indicate mercy instead of strength suggest?
  • D&C 29:2: How does the metaphor of this verse compare to that of the previous verse? What does it mean, in this context, to call on the Lord in mighty prayer?
  • D&C 29:4: What does it mean to be chosen “out of the world"? How does that occur?
  • D&C 29:5: What does it mean to say that Christ is in our midst? How is that related to the gathering? How is the fact that he is our advocate with the Father relevant here?
  • D&C 29:5: Why does the Lord describe himself as an advocate?
  • D&C 29:5: Is his advocacy on our behalf related to the Father’s gift of the kingdom? If so, what does it mean to say that giving us that kingdom is the Father’s good will?
  • D&C 29:6: Notice how this verse differs from the same idea expressed in many other scriptures by adding “being united in prayer according to my command.” What is the significance of that addition?
  • D&C 29:6: Where are we commanded to be united in prayer? What does it mean to be united in prayer?
  • D&C 29:6: To whom is this addressed? In other words, who is called to bring the gathering to pass?
  • D&C 29:6: Does this verse define what it means to be elect?
  • D&C 29:8: At the time of this revelation, the gathering was to a particular location. Now it is to any of the stakes. How does that difference change our understanding of what it means to gather together?
  • D&C 29:8: The gathering is “to prepare their hearts.” How does the gathering do that? It is also “to [. . .] be prepared in all things against” the day of tribulation. What is that day?
  • D&C 29:8: How does the gathering prepare us for that day?
  • D&C 29:12: The Twelve which were with me in my ministry at Jerusalem. Who are these twelve? Would Judas Iscariot count as one of these? Might other, subsequent apostles—like Mathias (Acts 1:23-26) and Paul—be included?
  • D&C 29:36: Which is my power. Is this part of the devil's quote or is it God talking again? How does the answer to this question affect the meaning of the verse?

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D&C 34:1-5

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  • D&C 34 is addressed to Orson Pratt.

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For a brief overview of D&C 34 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.

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D&C 34:6-12

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  • D&C 34 is addressed to Orson Pratt.

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D&C 43:16-20

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For a brief overview of D&C 43 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

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  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

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D&C 43:21-25

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  • D&C 43:11. Gordon B. Hinckley, "Rise Up, O Men of God," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 59–61. President Hinckley counsels against unclean thoughts, abuse of any kind, "slouchy" dress, profanity, taking the Lord's name in vain, and pornography. "The computer is a wonderful instrument when it is properly used. But when it is used to deal with pornography or so-called chat rooms or for any other purpose that leads to evil practices or evil thoughts, then there must be self-discipline enough to turn it off."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 45:16-20

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For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

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  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

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  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

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D&C 45:21-25

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This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 45:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 45
Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 45:66-70

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 45:71-75

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 44
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 46
  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 45 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:3-5: Courtroom setting. Verse 3-5 is understood in the setting of a court room. We stand on trial, the Savior is our defense attorney, Satan is our prosecutor, and the Father oversees our judgment.
  • The Savior stands for up for us and pleads our case, "It is my recommendation that ________ be admitted into the Celestial Kingdom."
  • "I OBJECT," cries Satan.
  • "On what grounds?" asks the Father.
  • "On the grounds that he has broken commandments," Satan replies. "See look, I have evidence."
  • Then the Savior stands and presents His evidence. This is verses 4 and 5.
  • Exhibit A: "Father, behold the sufferings and death of him who did no sin, in whom thou wast well pleased; behold the blood of thy Son which was shed..."
  • Exhibit B: "...these my brethren...believe on my name..."
  • We are acquitted not on the grounds that we always do what we are commanded to do; we are acquitted because of Jesus Christ's Atonement and our faith in Him.
In verses 4-5 the Lord shares with us his pleadings for our sake with God the Father. It seems that the reason for Him to share this sacred prayer with us is that He hopes that hearing His love and remembering His sacrifice will help us to listen--to really listen, i.e. listen without hardening our hearts to what the Lord says. The Lord makes this purpose explicit in verse 6.
  • D&C 45:17. Hey Sean, Interesting question on verse 17. Though I'm not sure if the same is true of the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50, here there seems to be the idea that the apostles are wrong in their view. It is as though Jesus is saying something like "you think that the long separation of your spirits from your bodies is bondage" D&C 45:17 but ... "if you sleep in peace, blessed are you, for you will rise triumphant" D&C 45:46. At this point it isn't surprising that they might have a wrong view of how things will be since they haven't died yet. (Again this seems different from the way the phrase is used in D&C 138:50.)
This reading though fails to explain why Jesus chooses to explain how the second coming will work in such detail as that amount of detail seems unrelated to the point he makes in verse 46. But hopefully, this start is helpful.
Yes, I think I can see what you are pointing out. He's not pointing to a current state of things so much as a future expected state of things and showing how that state will come to an end. Thus, when their spirits are separated from their bodies, they will also have cause to rejoice in recognizing the signs of the second coming. Thanks, that was helpful.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 45:8. In verse 8 the Lord tells us that he gives "power to become the sons of God" to "as many as received" Him. In the same verse the Lord tells us that he gave "power to obtain eternal life" to "them that believed on [His] name." Is the Lord essentially saying the same thing twice using different words? In this reading "power to obtain eternal life" and "power to become the sons of God" would mean pretty much the same thing and receiving Christ and believing on Christ's name would mean pretty much the same thing. Or, is the Lord making a distinction between those who receive Him and those who believe on him by showing us the different blessings each receives.
  • D&C 45:17. What is this about a long absence of spirits from bodies? Why is this here in this context?
  • D&C 45:66-70. What does that mean that it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another. Does that refer to our day? Where is the zion they are referring too.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 45 is __.
  • D&C 45 was first published in __.
  • D&C 45 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 45:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 45.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 44                         Next section: D&C 46

D&C 49:6-10

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  • Received:
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  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add historical setting

For a brief overview of D&C 49 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 7 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 8.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 49 is __.
  • D&C 49 was first published in __.
  • D&C 49 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 49:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 49.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 88:86-90

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3: My friends. The Lord calls those he addresses here my friends. This use of friends is similar to how it is used in John 15:14-15 where the Lord distinguishes his servants from his friends. See also D&C 84:63.
  • D&C 88:15: Soul. Though "soul" is defined here as the unity of the spirit and body, it isn't always or even often used that way in other scriptures. This definition is one which seems to have been saved for the latter-days. Therefore, when you read the word "soul" in scripture, you must ask yourself whether the writer meant "spirit" or "soul" as it is used here.
  • D&C 88:15. This is an important doctrine, for traditional Christianity has often denigrated the body, and because of that denigration our culture still often looks on the body as a hindrance (or, in backlash, it thinks of the body as the only thing). The privilege and acclaim we sometimes give supposedly intellectual professions over more physical professions is one of the remnants of this misunderstanding of the body and the spirit.
  • D&C 88:22: Abide. "Abide" means "wait for," "be prepared for," "endure," or "sustain."
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 speaks of those who remain, after those who receive a celestial, terrestrial and telestial glory have received it. The end of the verse tells us that these are they who are not willing to enjoy that which they might have received. It seems that what they might have received is one of the kingdom's of glory, or in other words, salvation (as the term is used in D&C 76:43). In D&C 76 (in verses 32 and 43) these people who do not receive salvation are referred to as the sons of perdition.
  • D&C 88:47. D&C 88 begins with a discussion of how Christ became "in and through all things" including the sun, moon, and stars because of his ascending above and descending below all things during the atonement. Here in verse 47, we are told that when we see the movement of the sun, moon or stars, we see God. We might ask about the promise to see God, is this all it means?--that we can see the sun, moon or stars? For most people, seeing the sun, moon, or stars is not the same as seeing God, just as verse 48 reminds us that when Jesus came to the earth, many people did not comprehend him--they just saw a carpenter from Nazareth, because they did not understand what they saw. Likewise, if we just see the sun, moon, or stars, we might miss seeing God if we don't understand how He is connected to them through the creation and the atonement. D&C 88 seems to challenge us to look beyond the mere physics of heavenly objects to seek out God. Especially in light of vv. 11-12, one might also see in this a merciful invitation to begin to see God (i.e., through phenomenon derived from his grace but not requiring translation/calling and election made sure, etc. that we might normally associate with the privilege of viewing God). See D&C 18:36 for a similarly "right in front of your face" way to hear His voice.

D&C 88:69-84: What the elders who attend the school of the prophets are to do[edit]

D&C 88:85-116: Signs of the times[edit]

D&C 88:117-126: Kirtland Temple[edit]

D&C 88:127-141: Order of the School of the Prophets[edit]

  • D&C 88:127-141: Later receipt. Verses 127-141 were received two weeks later than the rest of D&C 88.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3. The verse ends "as is recorded in the testimony of John." Is this a reference to John 14:16?
  • D&C 88:4. How is the comforter the promise of eternal life?
  • D&C 88:15. What are some of the ways that we forget that the spirit and the body are one?
  • D&C 88:17. Why is it significant in the context of the redemption of the soul to note that Jesus promised the earth to the poor and meek? Why do these two things belong together?
  • D&C 88:21-22. We sometimes speak of being sanctified through obedience to law, but verse 21 speaks of being sanctified through the law. Is that any different? If so, how so? If not, why not?
  • D&C 88:21-22. Why do you suppose the Lord speak of abiding a law rather than obeying a law?
  • D&C 88:31. How does the phrase "receive of the same, even a fulness" square with D&C 76:86 where seems to say that those of a telestial glory "receive not of his fulness in the eternal world"? Is "fulness" referring to different things in these two passages? Or are these talking about two different periods of time? Or is something else going on?
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 tells us that the sons of perdition (see exegesis) enjoy that which they are willing to receive. Since the sons of perdition have openly rejected Christ, what is there left to receive?
  • D&C 88:35: A law unto itself. What does this phrase mean? Is it related to Rom 2:14 where the Gentiles are said to be a "law unto themselves" (but in a seemingly positive context there, in contrast to the seemingly negative context here)?
  • D&C 88:67-68. Verse 67 contains promises for those whose "eye be single to [the Lord's] glory", while verse 68 states contains a promise for those who sanctify themselves that "[their] minds become single to God." What is the relationship between the eye and the mind in these verses? Could eye and mind be used interchangeably in these verses?
  • D&C 88:69. What is the "great and last promise" we are to remember? Is it the promise found in verse 68?
  • D&C 88:78. What is the law of the gospel? Is it some specific law, or set of laws (e.g. the law of Moses)? or does it mean something general like "all the commandments"? (Maybe D&C 74:4 would be of help? There law of Moses and gospel of Christ are setup in contrast.)
  • D&C 88:114. Is this a metaphorical battle, like the one in the pre-mortal existence? Do Satan's armies only consist of the 1/3 of the hosts of heaven that are his spirit beings followers, or will people fall from glory and join Satan and his ranks?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 88 is __.
  • D&C 88 was first published in __.
  • D&C 88 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 88:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 88.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 88:22. Larry W. Gibbons, "Wherefore, Settle This in Your Hearts," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 102–4. Elder Gibbons states: "Commandments are not given to burden or restrict us. Rather, they are guideposts from an all-wise Heavenly Father to keep us out of trouble, to bring us a fulness of happiness in this life, and to bring us safely back home to Him... Brothers and sisters, keeping the commandments makes all the difference in this life and in the next. To be worthy of the celestial kingdom and the joy that is there, we must keep the commandments!"
  • D&C 88:33. A. Roger Merrill, "Receiving by the Spirit," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 92-94. Elder Merrill ponders: "One cannot help but wonder how many gifts and blessings surround us that we do not receive."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 87                         Next section: D&C 89

D&C 88:91-95

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 87
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 89

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3: My friends. The Lord calls those he addresses here my friends. This use of friends is similar to how it is used in John 15:14-15 where the Lord distinguishes his servants from his friends. See also D&C 84:63.
  • D&C 88:15: Soul. Though "soul" is defined here as the unity of the spirit and body, it isn't always or even often used that way in other scriptures. This definition is one which seems to have been saved for the latter-days. Therefore, when you read the word "soul" in scripture, you must ask yourself whether the writer meant "spirit" or "soul" as it is used here.
  • D&C 88:15. This is an important doctrine, for traditional Christianity has often denigrated the body, and because of that denigration our culture still often looks on the body as a hindrance (or, in backlash, it thinks of the body as the only thing). The privilege and acclaim we sometimes give supposedly intellectual professions over more physical professions is one of the remnants of this misunderstanding of the body and the spirit.
  • D&C 88:22: Abide. "Abide" means "wait for," "be prepared for," "endure," or "sustain."
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 speaks of those who remain, after those who receive a celestial, terrestrial and telestial glory have received it. The end of the verse tells us that these are they who are not willing to enjoy that which they might have received. It seems that what they might have received is one of the kingdom's of glory, or in other words, salvation (as the term is used in D&C 76:43). In D&C 76 (in verses 32 and 43) these people who do not receive salvation are referred to as the sons of perdition.
  • D&C 88:47. D&C 88 begins with a discussion of how Christ became "in and through all things" including the sun, moon, and stars because of his ascending above and descending below all things during the atonement. Here in verse 47, we are told that when we see the movement of the sun, moon or stars, we see God. We might ask about the promise to see God, is this all it means?--that we can see the sun, moon or stars? For most people, seeing the sun, moon, or stars is not the same as seeing God, just as verse 48 reminds us that when Jesus came to the earth, many people did not comprehend him--they just saw a carpenter from Nazareth, because they did not understand what they saw. Likewise, if we just see the sun, moon, or stars, we might miss seeing God if we don't understand how He is connected to them through the creation and the atonement. D&C 88 seems to challenge us to look beyond the mere physics of heavenly objects to seek out God. Especially in light of vv. 11-12, one might also see in this a merciful invitation to begin to see God (i.e., through phenomenon derived from his grace but not requiring translation/calling and election made sure, etc. that we might normally associate with the privilege of viewing God). See D&C 18:36 for a similarly "right in front of your face" way to hear His voice.

D&C 88:69-84: What the elders who attend the school of the prophets are to do[edit]

D&C 88:85-116: Signs of the times[edit]

D&C 88:117-126: Kirtland Temple[edit]

D&C 88:127-141: Order of the School of the Prophets[edit]

  • D&C 88:127-141: Later receipt. Verses 127-141 were received two weeks later than the rest of D&C 88.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3. The verse ends "as is recorded in the testimony of John." Is this a reference to John 14:16?
  • D&C 88:4. How is the comforter the promise of eternal life?
  • D&C 88:15. What are some of the ways that we forget that the spirit and the body are one?
  • D&C 88:17. Why is it significant in the context of the redemption of the soul to note that Jesus promised the earth to the poor and meek? Why do these two things belong together?
  • D&C 88:21-22. We sometimes speak of being sanctified through obedience to law, but verse 21 speaks of being sanctified through the law. Is that any different? If so, how so? If not, why not?
  • D&C 88:21-22. Why do you suppose the Lord speak of abiding a law rather than obeying a law?
  • D&C 88:31. How does the phrase "receive of the same, even a fulness" square with D&C 76:86 where seems to say that those of a telestial glory "receive not of his fulness in the eternal world"? Is "fulness" referring to different things in these two passages? Or are these talking about two different periods of time? Or is something else going on?
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 tells us that the sons of perdition (see exegesis) enjoy that which they are willing to receive. Since the sons of perdition have openly rejected Christ, what is there left to receive?
  • D&C 88:35: A law unto itself. What does this phrase mean? Is it related to Rom 2:14 where the Gentiles are said to be a "law unto themselves" (but in a seemingly positive context there, in contrast to the seemingly negative context here)?
  • D&C 88:67-68. Verse 67 contains promises for those whose "eye be single to [the Lord's] glory", while verse 68 states contains a promise for those who sanctify themselves that "[their] minds become single to God." What is the relationship between the eye and the mind in these verses? Could eye and mind be used interchangeably in these verses?
  • D&C 88:69. What is the "great and last promise" we are to remember? Is it the promise found in verse 68?
  • D&C 88:78. What is the law of the gospel? Is it some specific law, or set of laws (e.g. the law of Moses)? or does it mean something general like "all the commandments"? (Maybe D&C 74:4 would be of help? There law of Moses and gospel of Christ are setup in contrast.)
  • D&C 88:114. Is this a metaphorical battle, like the one in the pre-mortal existence? Do Satan's armies only consist of the 1/3 of the hosts of heaven that are his spirit beings followers, or will people fall from glory and join Satan and his ranks?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 88 is __.
  • D&C 88 was first published in __.
  • D&C 88 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 88:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 88.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 88:22. Larry W. Gibbons, "Wherefore, Settle This in Your Hearts," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 102–4. Elder Gibbons states: "Commandments are not given to burden or restrict us. Rather, they are guideposts from an all-wise Heavenly Father to keep us out of trouble, to bring us a fulness of happiness in this life, and to bring us safely back home to Him... Brothers and sisters, keeping the commandments makes all the difference in this life and in the next. To be worthy of the celestial kingdom and the joy that is there, we must keep the commandments!"
  • D&C 88:33. A. Roger Merrill, "Receiving by the Spirit," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 92-94. Elder Merrill ponders: "One cannot help but wonder how many gifts and blessings surround us that we do not receive."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 87                         Next section: D&C 89

D&C 88:96-100

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 88
Previous section: D&C 87                         Next section: D&C 89


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 87
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 89

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3: My friends. The Lord calls those he addresses here my friends. This use of friends is similar to how it is used in John 15:14-15 where the Lord distinguishes his servants from his friends. See also D&C 84:63.
  • D&C 88:15: Soul. Though "soul" is defined here as the unity of the spirit and body, it isn't always or even often used that way in other scriptures. This definition is one which seems to have been saved for the latter-days. Therefore, when you read the word "soul" in scripture, you must ask yourself whether the writer meant "spirit" or "soul" as it is used here.
  • D&C 88:15. This is an important doctrine, for traditional Christianity has often denigrated the body, and because of that denigration our culture still often looks on the body as a hindrance (or, in backlash, it thinks of the body as the only thing). The privilege and acclaim we sometimes give supposedly intellectual professions over more physical professions is one of the remnants of this misunderstanding of the body and the spirit.
  • D&C 88:22: Abide. "Abide" means "wait for," "be prepared for," "endure," or "sustain."
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 speaks of those who remain, after those who receive a celestial, terrestrial and telestial glory have received it. The end of the verse tells us that these are they who are not willing to enjoy that which they might have received. It seems that what they might have received is one of the kingdom's of glory, or in other words, salvation (as the term is used in D&C 76:43). In D&C 76 (in verses 32 and 43) these people who do not receive salvation are referred to as the sons of perdition.
  • D&C 88:47. D&C 88 begins with a discussion of how Christ became "in and through all things" including the sun, moon, and stars because of his ascending above and descending below all things during the atonement. Here in verse 47, we are told that when we see the movement of the sun, moon or stars, we see God. We might ask about the promise to see God, is this all it means?--that we can see the sun, moon or stars? For most people, seeing the sun, moon, or stars is not the same as seeing God, just as verse 48 reminds us that when Jesus came to the earth, many people did not comprehend him--they just saw a carpenter from Nazareth, because they did not understand what they saw. Likewise, if we just see the sun, moon, or stars, we might miss seeing God if we don't understand how He is connected to them through the creation and the atonement. D&C 88 seems to challenge us to look beyond the mere physics of heavenly objects to seek out God. Especially in light of vv. 11-12, one might also see in this a merciful invitation to begin to see God (i.e., through phenomenon derived from his grace but not requiring translation/calling and election made sure, etc. that we might normally associate with the privilege of viewing God). See D&C 18:36 for a similarly "right in front of your face" way to hear His voice.

D&C 88:69-84: What the elders who attend the school of the prophets are to do[edit]

D&C 88:85-116: Signs of the times[edit]

D&C 88:117-126: Kirtland Temple[edit]

D&C 88:127-141: Order of the School of the Prophets[edit]

  • D&C 88:127-141: Later receipt. Verses 127-141 were received two weeks later than the rest of D&C 88.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3. The verse ends "as is recorded in the testimony of John." Is this a reference to John 14:16?
  • D&C 88:4. How is the comforter the promise of eternal life?
  • D&C 88:15. What are some of the ways that we forget that the spirit and the body are one?
  • D&C 88:17. Why is it significant in the context of the redemption of the soul to note that Jesus promised the earth to the poor and meek? Why do these two things belong together?
  • D&C 88:21-22. We sometimes speak of being sanctified through obedience to law, but verse 21 speaks of being sanctified through the law. Is that any different? If so, how so? If not, why not?
  • D&C 88:21-22. Why do you suppose the Lord speak of abiding a law rather than obeying a law?
  • D&C 88:31. How does the phrase "receive of the same, even a fulness" square with D&C 76:86 where seems to say that those of a telestial glory "receive not of his fulness in the eternal world"? Is "fulness" referring to different things in these two passages? Or are these talking about two different periods of time? Or is something else going on?
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 tells us that the sons of perdition (see exegesis) enjoy that which they are willing to receive. Since the sons of perdition have openly rejected Christ, what is there left to receive?
  • D&C 88:35: A law unto itself. What does this phrase mean? Is it related to Rom 2:14 where the Gentiles are said to be a "law unto themselves" (but in a seemingly positive context there, in contrast to the seemingly negative context here)?
  • D&C 88:67-68. Verse 67 contains promises for those whose "eye be single to [the Lord's] glory", while verse 68 states contains a promise for those who sanctify themselves that "[their] minds become single to God." What is the relationship between the eye and the mind in these verses? Could eye and mind be used interchangeably in these verses?
  • D&C 88:69. What is the "great and last promise" we are to remember? Is it the promise found in verse 68?
  • D&C 88:78. What is the law of the gospel? Is it some specific law, or set of laws (e.g. the law of Moses)? or does it mean something general like "all the commandments"? (Maybe D&C 74:4 would be of help? There law of Moses and gospel of Christ are setup in contrast.)
  • D&C 88:114. Is this a metaphorical battle, like the one in the pre-mortal existence? Do Satan's armies only consist of the 1/3 of the hosts of heaven that are his spirit beings followers, or will people fall from glory and join Satan and his ranks?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 88 is __.
  • D&C 88 was first published in __.
  • D&C 88 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 88:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 88.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 88:22. Larry W. Gibbons, "Wherefore, Settle This in Your Hearts," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 102–4. Elder Gibbons states: "Commandments are not given to burden or restrict us. Rather, they are guideposts from an all-wise Heavenly Father to keep us out of trouble, to bring us a fulness of happiness in this life, and to bring us safely back home to Him... Brothers and sisters, keeping the commandments makes all the difference in this life and in the next. To be worthy of the celestial kingdom and the joy that is there, we must keep the commandments!"
  • D&C 88:33. A. Roger Merrill, "Receiving by the Spirit," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 92-94. Elder Merrill ponders: "One cannot help but wonder how many gifts and blessings surround us that we do not receive."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 87                         Next section: D&C 89

D&C 101:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 101
Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 101:31-35

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 100
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 102

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:11: Cup of their iniquity. The cup of their iniquity" is a strange phrase, not found elsewhere in the scriptures. In Rev 17:4, the "great whore" is depicted as "having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication." In D&C 103:3 the Lord allows enemies of the Church to persist, "that they might fill up the measure of their iniquities, that their cup might be full."
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 the Lord explains that all found "upon the watch-tower" will be saved. He explains that this group of people are "mine Israel." It seems that the Lord is saying that though he is chastening his people now (because of their transgressions (see verse 2)) he will save all that endure these chastenings--those that haven't denied him (see verse 5). For those saints who recognize their own failings these verses can be comforting. They suggest that they Lord will try us with affliction, but that if we endure them by denying him not and continuing to be a part of Israel, he will save us.
  • D&C 101:32-34. D&C 101:32-34 says the Lord will "reveal all things" during the Millennium, including "things which have passed" [history], "hidden things which no man knew" [new revelations and surprises to us], "things of the earth" [science], and on and on. It's fascinating to think that there is so much more to learn, and exciting to know that if we're faithful we'll be able to learn all these things. Or rather, we'll be able to remember all these things, since we may have known some of them in our pre-earth life.
It is fascinating to gain new knowledge about any topic. Learning a little bit here and a little bit there, about "things that are in the earth, and upon the earth, and in heaven" is one of the most enjoyable things about life. It's exciting to make a new discovery, either first hand or second hand. But what will be even more enjoyable, the Lord says here, will be to experience this new knowledge in the next life, while in God's presence. Two verses later he says "In this world your joy is not full, but in me your joy is full." How wonderful that joy will be. And how we should strive in this life to find joy each day that will prepare us, little by little, to receive that fulness of joy.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 101:4. How should one interpret the comparison between the loss of Zion and the sacrifice of Abraham?
  • D&C 101:4. Loss of Zion? Is the reference in vs. 4 to losing Zion, or to the Saints getting their teeth kicked in by mobs in Missouri? Is it the existential loss of Zion or the physical abuse that is comparable to the suffering of Abraham here? At any rate, an interesting way to read this.
  • D&C 101:11. What is the "cup of their iniquity"? Is it related to the cup depicted in Rev 17:4?
  • D&C 101:12. In verse 12 it says that all the Lord's Israel shall be saved. Who is the Lord's Israel? What is this a promise of? What does it mean to be saved? (See also D&C 76:42.)
  • D&C 101:12. Note that the promise in verse 12 isn't just a promise to be saved, but it is a promise to be saved at a certain time. The verse starts with "in that day." When is that day? Is that the first resurrection, the resurrection of the just (D&C 76:17, D&C 76:64-65), or is that last resurrection, the resurrection of the unjust (D&C 76:85) or is it somewhere in between?
  • D&C 101:23. Verse 23 instructs us to "prepare for the revelation which is to come". Wouldn't we welcome new revelation? Why would we need to prepare for it, unless the new information is difficult to accept and that our faith may be tested at the second coming (assuming that's the timing of the revelation). I've often thought of the second coming as a pass/fail test, but this makes me question that and wonder if we need to be sufficiently prepared for those times, not to just avoid failing (burning in the molten earth of mount Doom), but to stay faithful even when new revelations tempt us to do otherwise.
  • D&C 101:78. Verse 78 Is there a significant tie between this verse and Mosiah 29:38? What does it say about democracy and monarchy? Is democracy a righteous progression from monarchy? (This is the situation in both cases) Does this refute the idea of "corporate guilt" (As C.S. Lewis calls it)?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 101 is __.
  • D&C 101 was first published in __.
  • D&C 101 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 101:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 101.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 100                         Next section: D&C 102

D&C 133:1-5

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:11-15

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 133:21-25

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:26-30

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:31-35

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:41-45

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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

D&C 133:71-74

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 133
Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 68
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 107

For a brief overview of D&C 133 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 9 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 10.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. In verse 51 the Lord tells us that he "tramples them" in his fury on the day of vengeance. "Them" here seems to refer to "all people" in the previous verse. It may mean all people who are his enemies. Earlier verses 42-44 makes a distinction between what will happen to those who work righteousness versus the Lord's adversaries. To the Lord's adversaries the Lord will do "terrible things" (v. 43) but those who work righteousness shall rejoice and be met by the Lord (v 44).

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. Can anyone help with my question? I'd like to understand better whether Christ treading the wine press alone refers only to the atonement or what Christ does at the second coming, or both. If just the former, why does it seem to keep coming up prophecies about the second coming (see my commentary on D&C 76:107). If both, what does treading the wine press alone have to do with the second coming? It makes sense to think understand Jesus on the cross treading alone Matt 27:46. But it is harder to understand what this means related to the second coming.

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 133:51. It is interesting that the imagery used for verse 51, which seems to refer to part of the second coming, seems related to the imagery often used for the atonement. What is the relation between the atonement and the Lord's vengeance? Notice that the sacrament also represents both the atonement and the bridegroom's supper at the Second Coming.

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 133 is __.
  • D&C 133 was first published in __.
  • D&C 133 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 133:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 133.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 68                         Next section: D&C 107b

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