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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


D&C 76:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:1-24
Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:1-24 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:1-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:7: The good pleasure of my will. In this preface to the revelation (verses 1-10) we are told in general terms of the blessings which are given to those who fear and serve God. We will then see in verses 11 and on, how this blessing was made manifest to Joseph and Sidney. What is made manifest to them is given here: the pleasure of God's will concerning the things pertaining to his kingdom or, as verse 10 puts it, the secrets of God's will. This language is closely related to Eph 1:5, 9. The point here, as there, seems to be that how and why God deals with us as he does, is not obvious to our own understanding. A similar point is made in Matt 20:1-16 and Matt 25:37-39, 44: God's will concerning our reward will often be different than the expectations of those he rewards.
  • D&C 76:12. Joseph and Sidney tell us that their "eyes were opened" and their "understandings were enlightened." This reminds us of verse 10 which tells us to those who fear God and those who serve him (see verse 5) God will make known unto them the secrets of his will--"even those things which eye has not seen, nor ear hear, nor yet entered into the heart of man." The paradox of seeing something man cannot see requires first that their "eyes were opened."

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:4. What does the phrase "from eternity to eternity" mean? Does it imply that there are multiple eternities? What might this even mean?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean to say that the Lord is "the same" from eternity to eternity? If the Lord was a pre-mortal spirit, then came and obtained a body, then was resurrected to full glory to inherit all that the Father has, hasn't he changed?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean that the Lord's "years never fail"?
  • D&C 76:5. If the LORD is a God of love, why do we need to "fear" him?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "in righteousness and in truth"?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "unto the end"? When is "the end"?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to have "all the hidden mysteries" revealed? Is there a difference between a mystery and a "hidden mystery"?
  • D&C 76:7. What is the difference between "days" of old and "ages" to come? Is there any deeper significance to using these two different ways of expressing periods of time?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to "make known" something? Is this just another way of saying "reveal"? How does the LORD make things known to us?
  • D&C 76:7. What does the phrase "good pleasure of my will" mean? (See also Eph 1:5.)
  • D&C 76:8. What are the "wonders" of eternity?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "wisdom of the wise"? How does it perish before revealed wisdom and understanding? How does latter day revelation stack up against modern science?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "understanding of the prudent"? Who are "the prudent"?
  • D&C 76:9. Are these statements hyberbolic or is there a greater meaning that we're missing here?
  • D&C 76:13. When is the "beginning" before the world was?
  • D&C 76:13. What are the things that "were ordained of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:13. What does it mean for the Only Begotten Son to be "in the bosom of the Father...from the beginning"?
  • D&C 76:14. Is this vision and section of scripture "the record" which is "the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ?" If so, is this revelation primarily about degrees of glory, as commonly presumed, or about "the fulness of the gospel"?
  • D&C 76:17. How does this verse differ from the KJV of John 5:29? How does the substitution of just/unjust for life/damnation change the meaning of this verse? What is the difference between being resurrected "unto" a resurrection or "in" a resurrection?
  • D&C 76:18. Why might this changed wording or sentiment of John 5:29 cause Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon "to marvel"? Why mention that it "was given...of the Spirit"? Wouldn't that be presumed?
  • D&C 76:19. What does it mean that they "meditated upon these things"? What does it mean to meditate and how should we do it? What is the difference between meditation and prayer?
  • D&C 76:19. What are "the eyes of our understanding"? What does it mean for the LORD to "touch" the eyes of understanding? How are these "eyes" opened?
  • D&C 76:19. What is the "glory of the Lord" and how does it shine "round about"?
  • D&C 76:20. How did Joseph and Sidney "behold" the glory of the Son?
  • D&C 76:20. What does it mean that Joseph and Sidney "received of his fulness"? What is this "fulness"? Is this a fulness of "the Son" or of "the Father" or does it matter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49

D&C 76:11-15

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:1-24
Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:1-24 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:1-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:7: The good pleasure of my will. In this preface to the revelation (verses 1-10) we are told in general terms of the blessings which are given to those who fear and serve God. We will then see in verses 11 and on, how this blessing was made manifest to Joseph and Sidney. What is made manifest to them is given here: the pleasure of God's will concerning the things pertaining to his kingdom or, as verse 10 puts it, the secrets of God's will. This language is closely related to Eph 1:5, 9. The point here, as there, seems to be that how and why God deals with us as he does, is not obvious to our own understanding. A similar point is made in Matt 20:1-16 and Matt 25:37-39, 44: God's will concerning our reward will often be different than the expectations of those he rewards.
  • D&C 76:12. Joseph and Sidney tell us that their "eyes were opened" and their "understandings were enlightened." This reminds us of verse 10 which tells us to those who fear God and those who serve him (see verse 5) God will make known unto them the secrets of his will--"even those things which eye has not seen, nor ear hear, nor yet entered into the heart of man." The paradox of seeing something man cannot see requires first that their "eyes were opened."

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:4. What does the phrase "from eternity to eternity" mean? Does it imply that there are multiple eternities? What might this even mean?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean to say that the Lord is "the same" from eternity to eternity? If the Lord was a pre-mortal spirit, then came and obtained a body, then was resurrected to full glory to inherit all that the Father has, hasn't he changed?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean that the Lord's "years never fail"?
  • D&C 76:5. If the LORD is a God of love, why do we need to "fear" him?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "in righteousness and in truth"?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "unto the end"? When is "the end"?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to have "all the hidden mysteries" revealed? Is there a difference between a mystery and a "hidden mystery"?
  • D&C 76:7. What is the difference between "days" of old and "ages" to come? Is there any deeper significance to using these two different ways of expressing periods of time?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to "make known" something? Is this just another way of saying "reveal"? How does the LORD make things known to us?
  • D&C 76:7. What does the phrase "good pleasure of my will" mean? (See also Eph 1:5.)
  • D&C 76:8. What are the "wonders" of eternity?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "wisdom of the wise"? How does it perish before revealed wisdom and understanding? How does latter day revelation stack up against modern science?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "understanding of the prudent"? Who are "the prudent"?
  • D&C 76:9. Are these statements hyberbolic or is there a greater meaning that we're missing here?
  • D&C 76:13. When is the "beginning" before the world was?
  • D&C 76:13. What are the things that "were ordained of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:13. What does it mean for the Only Begotten Son to be "in the bosom of the Father...from the beginning"?
  • D&C 76:14. Is this vision and section of scripture "the record" which is "the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ?" If so, is this revelation primarily about degrees of glory, as commonly presumed, or about "the fulness of the gospel"?
  • D&C 76:17. How does this verse differ from the KJV of John 5:29? How does the substitution of just/unjust for life/damnation change the meaning of this verse? What is the difference between being resurrected "unto" a resurrection or "in" a resurrection?
  • D&C 76:18. Why might this changed wording or sentiment of John 5:29 cause Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon "to marvel"? Why mention that it "was given...of the Spirit"? Wouldn't that be presumed?
  • D&C 76:19. What does it mean that they "meditated upon these things"? What does it mean to meditate and how should we do it? What is the difference between meditation and prayer?
  • D&C 76:19. What are "the eyes of our understanding"? What does it mean for the LORD to "touch" the eyes of understanding? How are these "eyes" opened?
  • D&C 76:19. What is the "glory of the Lord" and how does it shine "round about"?
  • D&C 76:20. How did Joseph and Sidney "behold" the glory of the Son?
  • D&C 76:20. What does it mean that Joseph and Sidney "received of his fulness"? What is this "fulness"? Is this a fulness of "the Son" or of "the Father" or does it matter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49

D&C 76:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:1-24
Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:1-24 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:1-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:7: The good pleasure of my will. In this preface to the revelation (verses 1-10) we are told in general terms of the blessings which are given to those who fear and serve God. We will then see in verses 11 and on, how this blessing was made manifest to Joseph and Sidney. What is made manifest to them is given here: the pleasure of God's will concerning the things pertaining to his kingdom or, as verse 10 puts it, the secrets of God's will. This language is closely related to Eph 1:5, 9. The point here, as there, seems to be that how and why God deals with us as he does, is not obvious to our own understanding. A similar point is made in Matt 20:1-16 and Matt 25:37-39, 44: God's will concerning our reward will often be different than the expectations of those he rewards.
  • D&C 76:12. Joseph and Sidney tell us that their "eyes were opened" and their "understandings were enlightened." This reminds us of verse 10 which tells us to those who fear God and those who serve him (see verse 5) God will make known unto them the secrets of his will--"even those things which eye has not seen, nor ear hear, nor yet entered into the heart of man." The paradox of seeing something man cannot see requires first that their "eyes were opened."

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:4. What does the phrase "from eternity to eternity" mean? Does it imply that there are multiple eternities? What might this even mean?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean to say that the Lord is "the same" from eternity to eternity? If the Lord was a pre-mortal spirit, then came and obtained a body, then was resurrected to full glory to inherit all that the Father has, hasn't he changed?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean that the Lord's "years never fail"?
  • D&C 76:5. If the LORD is a God of love, why do we need to "fear" him?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "in righteousness and in truth"?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "unto the end"? When is "the end"?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to have "all the hidden mysteries" revealed? Is there a difference between a mystery and a "hidden mystery"?
  • D&C 76:7. What is the difference between "days" of old and "ages" to come? Is there any deeper significance to using these two different ways of expressing periods of time?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to "make known" something? Is this just another way of saying "reveal"? How does the LORD make things known to us?
  • D&C 76:7. What does the phrase "good pleasure of my will" mean? (See also Eph 1:5.)
  • D&C 76:8. What are the "wonders" of eternity?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "wisdom of the wise"? How does it perish before revealed wisdom and understanding? How does latter day revelation stack up against modern science?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "understanding of the prudent"? Who are "the prudent"?
  • D&C 76:9. Are these statements hyberbolic or is there a greater meaning that we're missing here?
  • D&C 76:13. When is the "beginning" before the world was?
  • D&C 76:13. What are the things that "were ordained of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:13. What does it mean for the Only Begotten Son to be "in the bosom of the Father...from the beginning"?
  • D&C 76:14. Is this vision and section of scripture "the record" which is "the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ?" If so, is this revelation primarily about degrees of glory, as commonly presumed, or about "the fulness of the gospel"?
  • D&C 76:17. How does this verse differ from the KJV of John 5:29? How does the substitution of just/unjust for life/damnation change the meaning of this verse? What is the difference between being resurrected "unto" a resurrection or "in" a resurrection?
  • D&C 76:18. Why might this changed wording or sentiment of John 5:29 cause Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon "to marvel"? Why mention that it "was given...of the Spirit"? Wouldn't that be presumed?
  • D&C 76:19. What does it mean that they "meditated upon these things"? What does it mean to meditate and how should we do it? What is the difference between meditation and prayer?
  • D&C 76:19. What are "the eyes of our understanding"? What does it mean for the LORD to "touch" the eyes of understanding? How are these "eyes" opened?
  • D&C 76:19. What is the "glory of the Lord" and how does it shine "round about"?
  • D&C 76:20. How did Joseph and Sidney "behold" the glory of the Son?
  • D&C 76:20. What does it mean that Joseph and Sidney "received of his fulness"? What is this "fulness"? Is this a fulness of "the Son" or of "the Father" or does it matter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49

D&C 76:21-25

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:1-24
Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:1-24 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:1-24 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:7: The good pleasure of my will. In this preface to the revelation (verses 1-10) we are told in general terms of the blessings which are given to those who fear and serve God. We will then see in verses 11 and on, how this blessing was made manifest to Joseph and Sidney. What is made manifest to them is given here: the pleasure of God's will concerning the things pertaining to his kingdom or, as verse 10 puts it, the secrets of God's will. This language is closely related to Eph 1:5, 9. The point here, as there, seems to be that how and why God deals with us as he does, is not obvious to our own understanding. A similar point is made in Matt 20:1-16 and Matt 25:37-39, 44: God's will concerning our reward will often be different than the expectations of those he rewards.
  • D&C 76:12. Joseph and Sidney tell us that their "eyes were opened" and their "understandings were enlightened." This reminds us of verse 10 which tells us to those who fear God and those who serve him (see verse 5) God will make known unto them the secrets of his will--"even those things which eye has not seen, nor ear hear, nor yet entered into the heart of man." The paradox of seeing something man cannot see requires first that their "eyes were opened."

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:4. What does the phrase "from eternity to eternity" mean? Does it imply that there are multiple eternities? What might this even mean?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean to say that the Lord is "the same" from eternity to eternity? If the Lord was a pre-mortal spirit, then came and obtained a body, then was resurrected to full glory to inherit all that the Father has, hasn't he changed?
  • D&C 76:4. What does it mean that the Lord's "years never fail"?
  • D&C 76:5. If the LORD is a God of love, why do we need to "fear" him?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "in righteousness and in truth"?
  • D&C 76:5. What does it mean to serve "unto the end"? When is "the end"?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to have "all the hidden mysteries" revealed? Is there a difference between a mystery and a "hidden mystery"?
  • D&C 76:7. What is the difference between "days" of old and "ages" to come? Is there any deeper significance to using these two different ways of expressing periods of time?
  • D&C 76:7. What does it mean to "make known" something? Is this just another way of saying "reveal"? How does the LORD make things known to us?
  • D&C 76:7. What does the phrase "good pleasure of my will" mean? (See also Eph 1:5.)
  • D&C 76:8. What are the "wonders" of eternity?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "wisdom of the wise"? How does it perish before revealed wisdom and understanding? How does latter day revelation stack up against modern science?
  • D&C 76:9. What is the "understanding of the prudent"? Who are "the prudent"?
  • D&C 76:9. Are these statements hyberbolic or is there a greater meaning that we're missing here?
  • D&C 76:13. When is the "beginning" before the world was?
  • D&C 76:13. What are the things that "were ordained of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:13. What does it mean for the Only Begotten Son to be "in the bosom of the Father...from the beginning"?
  • D&C 76:14. Is this vision and section of scripture "the record" which is "the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ?" If so, is this revelation primarily about degrees of glory, as commonly presumed, or about "the fulness of the gospel"?
  • D&C 76:17. How does this verse differ from the KJV of John 5:29? How does the substitution of just/unjust for life/damnation change the meaning of this verse? What is the difference between being resurrected "unto" a resurrection or "in" a resurrection?
  • D&C 76:18. Why might this changed wording or sentiment of John 5:29 cause Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon "to marvel"? Why mention that it "was given...of the Spirit"? Wouldn't that be presumed?
  • D&C 76:19. What does it mean that they "meditated upon these things"? What does it mean to meditate and how should we do it? What is the difference between meditation and prayer?
  • D&C 76:19. What are "the eyes of our understanding"? What does it mean for the LORD to "touch" the eyes of understanding? How are these "eyes" opened?
  • D&C 76:19. What is the "glory of the Lord" and how does it shine "round about"?
  • D&C 76:20. How did Joseph and Sidney "behold" the glory of the Son?
  • D&C 76:20. What does it mean that Joseph and Sidney "received of his fulness"? What is this "fulness"? Is this a fulness of "the Son" or of "the Father" or does it matter?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Section 76                      Next page: Verses 76:25-49

D&C 76:26-30

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:25-49
Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70

D&C 76:31-35

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:25-49
Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70

D&C 76:36-40

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:25-49
Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70

D&C 76:41-45

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:25-49
Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70

D&C 76:46-50

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:25-49
Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:25-49 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:25-49 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:37: Second death. The phrase "second death" isn't used much in the scriptures. In the bible the phrase is used only 4 times--all in Revelations. There it is defined as "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where those not found written in the book of life are cast into (Rev 20:14-15) at the final judgement. Revelations tells us that the fearful, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, whoremongers, sorcerers, idolaters, and liars will all have some part in this second death (Rev 21:8).
  • D&C 76:40-45. If we look back at verse 40 we see that the Lord has introduced these verses by saying "This is the gospel...--" These verses are an explanation of what the gospel is, or in other words, what the glad tidings are. What are these glad tidings? We learn about an eternal punishment in Revelations, "the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone" (Rev 21:8) where the wicked are cast in. This punishment is the second death spoken of in verse 37. The glad tidings of the gospel, the point of these verses, is that very few will suffer this punishment, this second death. Instead, through the atonement, Christ will save all but the sons of perdition from this awful state. He will even save those who have committed serious sin: liars, sorcerers, adulterers, etc. (Note that in verse 108 we are told that these sinners will inherit the telestial kingdom. This assumes of course that they neither receive the testimony of Jesus (and thus inherit a better kingdom) or deny openly Christ (and become a son of perdition).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:29. What is Satan's work and glory? Does he focus on the world at large, or is he focused on making "war with the saints"?
  • D&C 76:29. What does it mean for Satan to encompass the saints round about?
  • D&C 76:30. Why does this vision of the degrees of glory start with a vision of Satan and the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:31. What are the exact requirements for becoming a son of perdition? How much power does one have to know and partake of and then deny?
  • D&C 76:31. What is the power of the LORD that sons of perdition know, partake of, then deny?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean to be a "vessel of wrath"?
  • D&C 76:33. What does it mean for sons of perdition to suffer with the devil and his angels "in eternity"?
  • D&C 76:34. Why is there no forgiveness for sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:34. What does it mean to have no forgiveness "in this world nor in the world to come"? What is "the world to come? Does this mean that they can never ever, ever, ever, ever be forgiven or only that they can't be forgiven in this life and the spirit world? What happens to them after that?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Holy Spirit?
  • D&C 76:35. How do sons of perdition deny the Only Begotten Son of the Father?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to crucify the LORD unto themselves?
  • D&C 76:35. What does it mean to put the LORD to an open shame? What is an "open shame"?
  • D&C 76:36. What does it mean that the sons of perdition will "go away" with the devil and his angels?
  • D&C 76:36. Who are the "angels" of the devil? Why are they called angels?
  • D&C 76:36. What is "the lake of fire and brimstone" where the devil and his angels will go?
  • D&C 76:37. Why are the sons of perdition the only ones on whom the second death shall have any power (verse 37)? If we think of the second death as being removed from the presence of God due to sin, then we might think this second death still has some power over those who live in the telestial or terrestial worlds. What does it mean to say that the second death doesn't have any power over those people?
  • D&C 76:38. What does it mean to "not be redeemed"?
  • D&C 76:38. What does "the due time of the Lord" mean?
  • D&C 76:38. What are "the sufferings of his wrath"?
    • D&C 76:38. Does this explain how the sons of perdition differ from those in the Telestial Kingdom, who are eventually redeemed from the second death after paying the price for their sins?
  • D&C 76:39. What does it mean that the LORD was "in the bosom of the Father"?
  • D&C 76:39. What are the "worlds" that were made? Does this refer to the creation of other earths?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to come into the world?
  • D&C 76:41. How was Christ crucified "for the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. ow does Christ "bear the sins of the world"? Is this different from "paying the price" of sin?
  • D&C 76:41. What does it mean to "sanctify the world"?
  • D&C 76:41. How does the atonement "cleanse" the world "from all unrighteousness"?
  • D&C 76:42. How many are "saved" by Christ? What does it mean to be "saved"?
  • D&C 76:42. Who are those "whom the Father had put into his power"? How can we be "put into his power"?
  • D&C 76:43. How does Christ glorify the Father?
  • D&C 76:43. What are "all the works of his hands"? Is this just people, or the rest of creation? What do "hands" have to do with work? What is this "work"? Is it the same as creation?
  • D&C 76:43. What does it mean to "deny the Son after the Father has revealed him"? How is the Son revealed by the Father?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that Christ saves all except the sons of perdition? Does this mean that being saved is the same as inheriting one of the three kingdoms of glory, or just that all eventually escape "the second death" and "the lake of fire and brimstone"?
  • D&C 76:44. What is "everlasting punishment"? Are everlasting, endless, and eternal all synonyms here, or do the represent different aspects of this punishment?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean for the sons of perdition to "reign" with the deveil?
  • D&C 76:44. What does it mean that "their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched"? How is this a torment?
  • D&C 76:45. What is the "end" mentioned here? Is it the end of the sons of perdition of just of their torment? Does this imply that their torment will eventually end?
  • D&C 76:46. Why is the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition not revealed except "to them who are made partakers thereof"?
  • D&C 76:47. Since the LORD just said that he doesn't reveal the end, place, or torment of the sons of perdition, how is it that "many" are shown "it" in a vision? What is it that isn't revealed in that vision? Is it the feeling associated with the torment? The "place" of the torment? The "end" of those tormented?
  • D&C 76:47. What does it mean for a vision to be shut up?
  • D&C 76:48. Does this help explain what isn't revealed in the vision of the sons of perdition?
  • D&C 76:48. What is the "end" or the "height" or the "depth" mentioned here?
  • D&C 76:48. What does it mean to be "ordained" to this condemnation? Is it literally an ordination, or does this mean something else?
  • D&C 76:49. Why are the sons of perdition considered "ungodly"?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • In lesson 19, The D&C and Church History Class Member Study Guide asks in reference to these (v 41-45) and other verses "Why is the Atonement central to the plan of salvation?" (See exegesis above.)

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:1-24                      Next page: Verses 76:50-70

D&C 76:51-55

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:50-70
Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:50-70 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:50-70 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:51: The testimony of Jesus. This phrase is found four times in the KJV of Revelations (Rev 1:2, Rev 1:9, Rev 19:10, Rev 12:17, and once in Alma 6:8. Joseph F. Smith also uses it in what appears to be a paraphrase of a verse in this section D&C 138:12. The phrase as used in these scriptures seems to refer to more than just a belief in Jesus, but a spiritual power referred to as "the spirit of prophecy" (Rev 19:10; Alma 6:8. There are many references to the "spirit of prophecy" in the Book of Mormon, where it is related to obtaining a foreknowledge of Christ's mission and sacrifice--but also seems to be an authorizing power that backs up gospel teaching.
  • D&C 76:53: Who overcome by faith. The phrase "overcome by faith" does not appear anywhere else in ancient or modern scripture. The English word "overcome" does occur over 20 times in the KJV of the bible, where it is often the translation of the Greek verb nikao which also means to conquer or vanquish (see discussion here).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:50. What is the "testimony of the gospel of Christ"? What does testimony mean in this case? What does it mean that the testimony is "concerning" those of the resurrection of the just?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to "receive the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to believe "on his name"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to be "buried in the water in his name"? Why do we have to be buried?
  • D&C 76:52. Why is authority necessary for baptism and confirmation?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to "overcome by faith"?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to be "sealed" by the Holy Spirit of promise? What is the Holy Spirit of promise? How does this sealing occur?
  • D&C 76:56. Is there a difference between these kinds of priests and those ordained as priests in the Aaronic priesthood?
  • D&C 76:56. How do we become priests and kings? How might this relate to temple worship?
  • D&C 76:56. How do priests and kings receive "his fulness, and...his glory"?
  • D&C 76:57. Is there a difference between these priests and those ordained as High Priests in the Melchizedek Priesthood in this life?
  • D&C 76:57. What does it mean for the priesthood to be referred to here as an "order"?
  • D&C 76:59. What does it mean that Celestial beings have all things, including "whether life or death"? Does this imply that Celestial beings have power to choose death after receiving Celestial glory?
  • D&C 76:59. How might "things present, or things to come" be given to Celestial beings? What does this mean?
  • D&C 76:60. What does it mean that Celestial beings "shall" overcome all things? Does that mean that they still have things to overcome after they reach the Celestial Kingdom?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80

D&C 76:56-60

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:50-70
Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:50-70 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:50-70 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:51: The testimony of Jesus. This phrase is found four times in the KJV of Revelations (Rev 1:2, Rev 1:9, Rev 19:10, Rev 12:17, and once in Alma 6:8. Joseph F. Smith also uses it in what appears to be a paraphrase of a verse in this section D&C 138:12. The phrase as used in these scriptures seems to refer to more than just a belief in Jesus, but a spiritual power referred to as "the spirit of prophecy" (Rev 19:10; Alma 6:8. There are many references to the "spirit of prophecy" in the Book of Mormon, where it is related to obtaining a foreknowledge of Christ's mission and sacrifice--but also seems to be an authorizing power that backs up gospel teaching.
  • D&C 76:53: Who overcome by faith. The phrase "overcome by faith" does not appear anywhere else in ancient or modern scripture. The English word "overcome" does occur over 20 times in the KJV of the bible, where it is often the translation of the Greek verb nikao which also means to conquer or vanquish (see discussion here).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:50. What is the "testimony of the gospel of Christ"? What does testimony mean in this case? What does it mean that the testimony is "concerning" those of the resurrection of the just?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to "receive the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to believe "on his name"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to be "buried in the water in his name"? Why do we have to be buried?
  • D&C 76:52. Why is authority necessary for baptism and confirmation?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to "overcome by faith"?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to be "sealed" by the Holy Spirit of promise? What is the Holy Spirit of promise? How does this sealing occur?
  • D&C 76:56. Is there a difference between these kinds of priests and those ordained as priests in the Aaronic priesthood?
  • D&C 76:56. How do we become priests and kings? How might this relate to temple worship?
  • D&C 76:56. How do priests and kings receive "his fulness, and...his glory"?
  • D&C 76:57. Is there a difference between these priests and those ordained as High Priests in the Melchizedek Priesthood in this life?
  • D&C 76:57. What does it mean for the priesthood to be referred to here as an "order"?
  • D&C 76:59. What does it mean that Celestial beings have all things, including "whether life or death"? Does this imply that Celestial beings have power to choose death after receiving Celestial glory?
  • D&C 76:59. How might "things present, or things to come" be given to Celestial beings? What does this mean?
  • D&C 76:60. What does it mean that Celestial beings "shall" overcome all things? Does that mean that they still have things to overcome after they reach the Celestial Kingdom?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80

D&C 76:61-65

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:50-70
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:50-70 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:50-70 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:51: The testimony of Jesus. This phrase is found four times in the KJV of Revelations (Rev 1:2, Rev 1:9, Rev 19:10, Rev 12:17, and once in Alma 6:8. Joseph F. Smith also uses it in what appears to be a paraphrase of a verse in this section D&C 138:12. The phrase as used in these scriptures seems to refer to more than just a belief in Jesus, but a spiritual power referred to as "the spirit of prophecy" (Rev 19:10; Alma 6:8. There are many references to the "spirit of prophecy" in the Book of Mormon, where it is related to obtaining a foreknowledge of Christ's mission and sacrifice--but also seems to be an authorizing power that backs up gospel teaching.
  • D&C 76:53: Who overcome by faith. The phrase "overcome by faith" does not appear anywhere else in ancient or modern scripture. The English word "overcome" does occur over 20 times in the KJV of the bible, where it is often the translation of the Greek verb nikao which also means to conquer or vanquish (see discussion here).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:50. What is the "testimony of the gospel of Christ"? What does testimony mean in this case? What does it mean that the testimony is "concerning" those of the resurrection of the just?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to "receive the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to believe "on his name"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to be "buried in the water in his name"? Why do we have to be buried?
  • D&C 76:52. Why is authority necessary for baptism and confirmation?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to "overcome by faith"?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to be "sealed" by the Holy Spirit of promise? What is the Holy Spirit of promise? How does this sealing occur?
  • D&C 76:56. Is there a difference between these kinds of priests and those ordained as priests in the Aaronic priesthood?
  • D&C 76:56. How do we become priests and kings? How might this relate to temple worship?
  • D&C 76:56. How do priests and kings receive "his fulness, and...his glory"?
  • D&C 76:57. Is there a difference between these priests and those ordained as High Priests in the Melchizedek Priesthood in this life?
  • D&C 76:57. What does it mean for the priesthood to be referred to here as an "order"?
  • D&C 76:59. What does it mean that Celestial beings have all things, including "whether life or death"? Does this imply that Celestial beings have power to choose death after receiving Celestial glory?
  • D&C 76:59. How might "things present, or things to come" be given to Celestial beings? What does this mean?
  • D&C 76:60. What does it mean that Celestial beings "shall" overcome all things? Does that mean that they still have things to overcome after they reach the Celestial Kingdom?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80

D&C 76:66-70

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:50-70
Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:50-70 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:50-70 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:51: The testimony of Jesus. This phrase is found four times in the KJV of Revelations (Rev 1:2, Rev 1:9, Rev 19:10, Rev 12:17, and once in Alma 6:8. Joseph F. Smith also uses it in what appears to be a paraphrase of a verse in this section D&C 138:12. The phrase as used in these scriptures seems to refer to more than just a belief in Jesus, but a spiritual power referred to as "the spirit of prophecy" (Rev 19:10; Alma 6:8. There are many references to the "spirit of prophecy" in the Book of Mormon, where it is related to obtaining a foreknowledge of Christ's mission and sacrifice--but also seems to be an authorizing power that backs up gospel teaching.
  • D&C 76:53: Who overcome by faith. The phrase "overcome by faith" does not appear anywhere else in ancient or modern scripture. The English word "overcome" does occur over 20 times in the KJV of the bible, where it is often the translation of the Greek verb nikao which also means to conquer or vanquish (see discussion here).

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:50. What is the "testimony of the gospel of Christ"? What does testimony mean in this case? What does it mean that the testimony is "concerning" those of the resurrection of the just?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to "receive the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to believe "on his name"?
  • D&C 76:51. What does it mean to be "buried in the water in his name"? Why do we have to be buried?
  • D&C 76:52. Why is authority necessary for baptism and confirmation?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to "overcome by faith"?
  • D&C 76:53. What does it mean to be "sealed" by the Holy Spirit of promise? What is the Holy Spirit of promise? How does this sealing occur?
  • D&C 76:56. Is there a difference between these kinds of priests and those ordained as priests in the Aaronic priesthood?
  • D&C 76:56. How do we become priests and kings? How might this relate to temple worship?
  • D&C 76:56. How do priests and kings receive "his fulness, and...his glory"?
  • D&C 76:57. Is there a difference between these priests and those ordained as High Priests in the Melchizedek Priesthood in this life?
  • D&C 76:57. What does it mean for the priesthood to be referred to here as an "order"?
  • D&C 76:59. What does it mean that Celestial beings have all things, including "whether life or death"? Does this imply that Celestial beings have power to choose death after receiving Celestial glory?
  • D&C 76:59. How might "things present, or things to come" be given to Celestial beings? What does this mean?
  • D&C 76:60. What does it mean that Celestial beings "shall" overcome all things? Does that mean that they still have things to overcome after they reach the Celestial Kingdom?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:25-49                      Next page: Verses 76:71-80

D&C 76:71-75

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:71-80
Previous page: Verses 76:50-70                      Next page: Verses 76:81-119


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:71-80 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:71-80 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:71-79. Verses 71-79 describe the vision Joseph Smith and Sidney Ridgdon had of the telestial kingdom. The phrase "these are they" is repeated throughout these verses to introduce each description of the people here. This is similar to verses 50-70 where "they are they" and then "these are they" is repeated throughout to introduce each description of the people in the celestial kingdom. In the description of the people in the celestial kingdom, each description seems to apply to everyone in the celestial kingdom and only to those in the celestial kingdom. In this way each description is self-contained. For example from verse 62 we get the idea that all of those in the celestial kingdom will dwell in the presence of God and Christ forever and that if we don't go to the celestial kingdom we won't be in their presence forever.
But, if we read verse 72 by itself as something that applies to everyone in the terrestrial kingdom and only applies to those in the terrestrial kingdom, we would come to the understanding that everyone who dies without the law would go to the terrestrial kingdom. But we know this is not the case from other scriptures. One of the footnotes points us to D&C 137:7-10. There the Lord makes it clear that those who die without the law because they did not have the chance to receive it, but would have received it had they been given the chance will go to the celestial kingdom.
If instead we read "these are they" as a partial description these verses make sense. Reading verses 71 to 74 together we see that those in the terrestrial kingdom are those who died without the law, whose spirits were kept in prison after death, who Christ visited and preached to there, who did not receive the testimony of Jesus in this life but received it after they died. D&C 138:32 makes the explicit distinction between those in spirit prison because they never had a chance to receive the gospel and those who rejected it. We read "received not" in verse 74 as a description of this latter group. Verse 75 then sums it up by saying that these people were "honorable" but "blinded by the craftiness of men." This doesn't apply to those people who simply never had the opportunity to accept the gospel.
  • D&C 76:72: Without law. The phrase without law is also used in Romans 2:12 (as noted in the footnote). In Romans 2:12-15 without law is used to mean without knowledge of the commandments.
  • D&C 76:79: Valiant. The English valiant is used over 20 times in the KJV Old Testament to translate the Hebrew chayil, which refers to power or might. In English, valiant is defined in Webster's 1828 dictionary as 1) strong; vigorous in body or 2) brave; courageous; intrepid in danger. The word comes to English from Latin via Old French, where it is the past participle of valēre "to be strong".
Being "valiant in the testimony of Jesus" seems to be used to distinguish between those of Celestial and Terrestrial glory. As discussed previously for D&C 76:51, the "testimony of Jesus" is referred to as the "spirit of prophecy" and seems to relate to an ability to obtain and dispense gospel truth through inspiration. To be valiant in that testimony would imply being brave, strong, and mighty in that ability. Only those who obtain the gift of the Holy Ghost and cultivate an ability to feel, recognize, and follow the Spirit are able to become strong in that ability, or "valiant in the testimony of Jesus". Without that ability to be directed and act "as one" with the Spirit, one cannot obtain a Celestial glory.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:72. What does whether one died without law (verse 72) or received not the testimony of Jesus in the flesh (verse 74) have to do with what kingdom someone will inherit?
  • D&C 76:79. What does it mean to be "valiant in the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:79. What is the "crown over the kingdom of our God"? What does it mean to "obtain" that crown?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:50-70                      Next page: Verses 76:81-119

D&C 76:76-80

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:71-80
Previous page: Verses 76:50-70                      Next page: Verses 76:81-119


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:71-80 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:71-80 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:71-79. Verses 71-79 describe the vision Joseph Smith and Sidney Ridgdon had of the telestial kingdom. The phrase "these are they" is repeated throughout these verses to introduce each description of the people here. This is similar to verses 50-70 where "they are they" and then "these are they" is repeated throughout to introduce each description of the people in the celestial kingdom. In the description of the people in the celestial kingdom, each description seems to apply to everyone in the celestial kingdom and only to those in the celestial kingdom. In this way each description is self-contained. For example from verse 62 we get the idea that all of those in the celestial kingdom will dwell in the presence of God and Christ forever and that if we don't go to the celestial kingdom we won't be in their presence forever.
But, if we read verse 72 by itself as something that applies to everyone in the terrestrial kingdom and only applies to those in the terrestrial kingdom, we would come to the understanding that everyone who dies without the law would go to the terrestrial kingdom. But we know this is not the case from other scriptures. One of the footnotes points us to D&C 137:7-10. There the Lord makes it clear that those who die without the law because they did not have the chance to receive it, but would have received it had they been given the chance will go to the celestial kingdom.
If instead we read "these are they" as a partial description these verses make sense. Reading verses 71 to 74 together we see that those in the terrestrial kingdom are those who died without the law, whose spirits were kept in prison after death, who Christ visited and preached to there, who did not receive the testimony of Jesus in this life but received it after they died. D&C 138:32 makes the explicit distinction between those in spirit prison because they never had a chance to receive the gospel and those who rejected it. We read "received not" in verse 74 as a description of this latter group. Verse 75 then sums it up by saying that these people were "honorable" but "blinded by the craftiness of men." This doesn't apply to those people who simply never had the opportunity to accept the gospel.
  • D&C 76:72: Without law. The phrase without law is also used in Romans 2:12 (as noted in the footnote). In Romans 2:12-15 without law is used to mean without knowledge of the commandments.
  • D&C 76:79: Valiant. The English valiant is used over 20 times in the KJV Old Testament to translate the Hebrew chayil, which refers to power or might. In English, valiant is defined in Webster's 1828 dictionary as 1) strong; vigorous in body or 2) brave; courageous; intrepid in danger. The word comes to English from Latin via Old French, where it is the past participle of valēre "to be strong".
Being "valiant in the testimony of Jesus" seems to be used to distinguish between those of Celestial and Terrestrial glory. As discussed previously for D&C 76:51, the "testimony of Jesus" is referred to as the "spirit of prophecy" and seems to relate to an ability to obtain and dispense gospel truth through inspiration. To be valiant in that testimony would imply being brave, strong, and mighty in that ability. Only those who obtain the gift of the Holy Ghost and cultivate an ability to feel, recognize, and follow the Spirit are able to become strong in that ability, or "valiant in the testimony of Jesus". Without that ability to be directed and act "as one" with the Spirit, one cannot obtain a Celestial glory.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:72. What does whether one died without law (verse 72) or received not the testimony of Jesus in the flesh (verse 74) have to do with what kingdom someone will inherit?
  • D&C 76:79. What does it mean to be "valiant in the testimony of Jesus"?
  • D&C 76:79. What is the "crown over the kingdom of our God"? What does it mean to "obtain" that crown?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:50-70                      Next page: Verses 76:81-119

D&C 76:81-85

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:86-90

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:91-95

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:96-100

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:101-105

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:106-110

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:111-115

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 76:116-119

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 76 > Verses 76:81-119
Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Section 76. The relationship of Verses 76:81-119 to the rest of Section 76 is discussed at D&C 76.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Verses 76:81-119 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:107. It makes sense that when Christ says in verse 107 that he trod the wine-press alone he is referring to his experience on the cross when he asks why he is forsaken (Matt 27:46). But there may be another meaning here related to the second coming. Note that this verse (as in D&C 88:106 and D&C 133:50) is part of Christ's report to the Father about the second coming. In D&C 133:51 the treading of the wine press seem to refer not to the atonement, but to the the Lord's day of vengeance when he does terrible things (D&C 133:42) to his adversaries (D&C 133:41). It seems then that the Lord works alone in two parallel cases: when he saves us through the atonement and when he takes out vengeance upon his enemies.
That the Lord works alone in the day of vengeance is consistent with other scriptures. Rom 12:19 and Morm 3:15 tell us that vengeance is the Lord's--we are not to participate in taking vengeance on the wicked.
The Lord explicitly tells us that he will work alone in taking vengeance. Contrast this with who he will bring with him when he comes to rule over the earth D&C 76:63.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 76:94. What is the church of the Firstborn?
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to see as you are seen and know as you are known? (See related exegesis on Isa 64:4.)
  • D&C 76:94. What does it mean to receive of God's "fulness"?
  • D&C 76:103. What does it mean to love and make a lie?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Verses 76:71-80                      This is the last page for Section 76

D&C 78:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 78
Previous section: D&C 77                         Next section: D&C 80


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 77
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 79

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 78:3. Why had the time come to establish a storehouse for the poor?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the historical circumstances that made that necessary?
  • D&C 78:3. What were the spiritual circumstances?
  • D&C 78:3. Do verses 4-5 explain why it was necessary?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why is equality in both heavenly and earthly things necessary if we wish to obtain heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:5-6. Why does inequality in earthly things prevent us from equally obtaining heavenly things?
  • D&C 78:6. For questions on verse 6, see verse 5.
  • D&C 78:11-12. How seriously does the Lord take the covenant that establishes the order of this storehouse?
  • D&C 78:11-12. What does that say to us about our responsibilities to the poor?
  • D&C 78:17-18. What does the Lord mean when he says the saints are as little children?
  • D&C 78:17-18. These verses mention two attributes of children, the inability to understand the blessings prepared and the inability to bear all things. How do they apply to us?
  • D&C 78:19. Why is thankfulness so essential to being made glorious?
  • D&C 78:19. What does it mean to be made glorious? To what might the Lord be referring?
  • D&C 78:22. What is the significance of this promise in the context of this particular revelation?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 78 is __.
  • D&C 78 was first published in __.
  • D&C 78 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 78:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 78.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 88:21-25

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  • D&C 88:3: My friends. The Lord calls those he addresses here my friends. This use of friends is similar to how it is used in John 15:14-15 where the Lord distinguishes his servants from his friends. See also D&C 84:63.
  • D&C 88:15: Soul. Though "soul" is defined here as the unity of the spirit and body, it isn't always or even often used that way in other scriptures. This definition is one which seems to have been saved for the latter-days. Therefore, when you read the word "soul" in scripture, you must ask yourself whether the writer meant "spirit" or "soul" as it is used here.
  • D&C 88:15. This is an important doctrine, for traditional Christianity has often denigrated the body, and because of that denigration our culture still often looks on the body as a hindrance (or, in backlash, it thinks of the body as the only thing). The privilege and acclaim we sometimes give supposedly intellectual professions over more physical professions is one of the remnants of this misunderstanding of the body and the spirit.
  • D&C 88:22: Abide. "Abide" means "wait for," "be prepared for," "endure," or "sustain."
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 speaks of those who remain, after those who receive a celestial, terrestrial and telestial glory have received it. The end of the verse tells us that these are they who are not willing to enjoy that which they might have received. It seems that what they might have received is one of the kingdom's of glory, or in other words, salvation (as the term is used in D&C 76:43). In D&C 76 (in verses 32 and 43) these people who do not receive salvation are referred to as the sons of perdition.
  • D&C 88:47. D&C 88 begins with a discussion of how Christ became "in and through all things" including the sun, moon, and stars because of his ascending above and descending below all things during the atonement. Here in verse 47, we are told that when we see the movement of the sun, moon or stars, we see God. We might ask about the promise to see God, is this all it means?--that we can see the sun, moon or stars? For most people, seeing the sun, moon, or stars is not the same as seeing God, just as verse 48 reminds us that when Jesus came to the earth, many people did not comprehend him--they just saw a carpenter from Nazareth, because they did not understand what they saw. Likewise, if we just see the sun, moon, or stars, we might miss seeing God if we don't understand how He is connected to them through the creation and the atonement. D&C 88 seems to challenge us to look beyond the mere physics of heavenly objects to seek out God. Especially in light of vv. 11-12, one might also see in this a merciful invitation to begin to see God (i.e., through phenomenon derived from his grace but not requiring translation/calling and election made sure, etc. that we might normally associate with the privilege of viewing God). See D&C 18:36 for a similarly "right in front of your face" way to hear His voice.

D&C 88:69-84: What the elders who attend the school of the prophets are to do[edit]

D&C 88:85-116: Signs of the times[edit]

D&C 88:117-126: Kirtland Temple[edit]

D&C 88:127-141: Order of the School of the Prophets[edit]

  • D&C 88:127-141: Later receipt. Verses 127-141 were received two weeks later than the rest of D&C 88.

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 88:3. The verse ends "as is recorded in the testimony of John." Is this a reference to John 14:16?
  • D&C 88:4. How is the comforter the promise of eternal life?
  • D&C 88:15. What are some of the ways that we forget that the spirit and the body are one?
  • D&C 88:17. Why is it significant in the context of the redemption of the soul to note that Jesus promised the earth to the poor and meek? Why do these two things belong together?
  • D&C 88:21-22. We sometimes speak of being sanctified through obedience to law, but verse 21 speaks of being sanctified through the law. Is that any different? If so, how so? If not, why not?
  • D&C 88:21-22. Why do you suppose the Lord speak of abiding a law rather than obeying a law?
  • D&C 88:31. How does the phrase "receive of the same, even a fulness" square with D&C 76:86 where seems to say that those of a telestial glory "receive not of his fulness in the eternal world"? Is "fulness" referring to different things in these two passages? Or are these talking about two different periods of time? Or is something else going on?
  • D&C 88:32. Verse 32 tells us that the sons of perdition (see exegesis) enjoy that which they are willing to receive. Since the sons of perdition have openly rejected Christ, what is there left to receive?
  • D&C 88:35: A law unto itself. What does this phrase mean? Is it related to Rom 2:14 where the Gentiles are said to be a "law unto themselves" (but in a seemingly positive context there, in contrast to the seemingly negative context here)?
  • D&C 88:67-68. Verse 67 contains promises for those whose "eye be single to [the Lord's] glory", while verse 68 states contains a promise for those who sanctify themselves that "[their] minds become single to God." What is the relationship between the eye and the mind in these verses? Could eye and mind be used interchangeably in these verses?
  • D&C 88:69. What is the "great and last promise" we are to remember? Is it the promise found in verse 68?
  • D&C 88:78. What is the law of the gospel? Is it some specific law, or set of laws (e.g. the law of Moses)? or does it mean something general like "all the commandments"? (Maybe D&C 74:4 would be of help? There law of Moses and gospel of Christ are setup in contrast.)
  • D&C 88:114. Is this a metaphorical battle, like the one in the pre-mortal existence? Do Satan's armies only consist of the 1/3 of the hosts of heaven that are his spirit beings followers, or will people fall from glory and join Satan and his ranks?

Resources[edit]

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Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 88 is __.
  • D&C 88 was first published in __.
  • D&C 88 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 88:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 88.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

  • D&C 88:22. Larry W. Gibbons, "Wherefore, Settle This in Your Hearts," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 102–4. Elder Gibbons states: "Commandments are not given to burden or restrict us. Rather, they are guideposts from an all-wise Heavenly Father to keep us out of trouble, to bring us a fulness of happiness in this life, and to bring us safely back home to Him... Brothers and sisters, keeping the commandments makes all the difference in this life and in the next. To be worthy of the celestial kingdom and the joy that is there, we must keep the commandments!"
  • D&C 88:33. A. Roger Merrill, "Receiving by the Spirit," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 92-94. Elder Merrill ponders: "One cannot help but wonder how many gifts and blessings surround us that we do not receive."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 131:1-5

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 130
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 132

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 131:1-4. These verses are often cited in General conference addresses. These verses are often cited within the context of teaching that a men and women cannot be exalted alone--each needs the other. As Elder Nelson put it in a November 1989 address "Men and women receive the highest ordinance in the house of the Lord together and equally, or not at all." To see other citations look at theLDS General Conference Scriptural Index.
  • D&C 131:4. Verse 3 tells us that one who does not enter into "this order of the priesthood [meaning the new and everlasting covenant of marriage]" cannot obtain the highest heaven or degree of the celestial glory. Here in verse 4 we read that such a person "may enter into the other" two heavens or degrees, "but that is the end of his kingdom, he cannot have an increase." This last statement may seem to support the view that once assigned to a degree one cannot move to another. In fact, this verse works well under both views; it doesn't support one view or the other.
If one believes that one cannot move to a higher degree once assigned to a lower degree, then to say that a person "may enter into the other" is to give them a fixed position. Under this reading for a person assigned to a lower kingdom, the phrase "he cannot have an increase" supports their already held view that such an assignment is permanently fixed.
On the other hand, if one believes that one may be able to move to a higher degree once assigned to a lower degree, then the phrase "he cannot have an increase" is read within the context of a person who does not enter into this order of the priesthood. Or in other words, verse 4 mainly becomes a restatement of verse 3, which itself is a restatement of verse 2. In that case all three verses say thee same thing: someone who doesn't enter into the order of the priesthood cannot obtain the highest degree in the celestial glory. In that case, these verses don't comment on whether or when there will be an opportunity later to enter into this covenant and progress to the highest degree.
  • D&C 131:5. The phrase "through the power of the Holy Priesthood" has reference to certain priesthood ordinances performed in the temple as promised to those who are true and faithful to the covenants entered into in the endowment.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

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  • D&C 131:4. What does it mean to say that someone in the Celestial Kingdom "cannot have an increase"? Does this mean that they do not progress eternally? How might this be related to the ability to have eternal posterity?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 131 is __.
  • D&C 131 was first published in __.
  • D&C 131 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 131:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 131.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 130                         Next section: D&C 132

D&C 131:6-8

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 131:1-4. These verses are often cited in General conference addresses. These verses are often cited within the context of teaching that a men and women cannot be exalted alone--each needs the other. As Elder Nelson put it in a November 1989 address "Men and women receive the highest ordinance in the house of the Lord together and equally, or not at all." To see other citations look at theLDS General Conference Scriptural Index.
  • D&C 131:4. Verse 3 tells us that one who does not enter into "this order of the priesthood [meaning the new and everlasting covenant of marriage]" cannot obtain the highest heaven or degree of the celestial glory. Here in verse 4 we read that such a person "may enter into the other" two heavens or degrees, "but that is the end of his kingdom, he cannot have an increase." This last statement may seem to support the view that once assigned to a degree one cannot move to another. In fact, this verse works well under both views; it doesn't support one view or the other.
If one believes that one cannot move to a higher degree once assigned to a lower degree, then to say that a person "may enter into the other" is to give them a fixed position. Under this reading for a person assigned to a lower kingdom, the phrase "he cannot have an increase" supports their already held view that such an assignment is permanently fixed.
On the other hand, if one believes that one may be able to move to a higher degree once assigned to a lower degree, then the phrase "he cannot have an increase" is read within the context of a person who does not enter into this order of the priesthood. Or in other words, verse 4 mainly becomes a restatement of verse 3, which itself is a restatement of verse 2. In that case all three verses say thee same thing: someone who doesn't enter into the order of the priesthood cannot obtain the highest degree in the celestial glory. In that case, these verses don't comment on whether or when there will be an opportunity later to enter into this covenant and progress to the highest degree.
  • D&C 131:5. The phrase "through the power of the Holy Priesthood" has reference to certain priesthood ordinances performed in the temple as promised to those who are true and faithful to the covenants entered into in the endowment.

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 131:4. What does it mean to say that someone in the Celestial Kingdom "cannot have an increase"? Does this mean that they do not progress eternally? How might this be related to the ability to have eternal posterity?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 131 is __.
  • D&C 131 was first published in __.
  • D&C 131 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 131:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 131.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 132:16-20

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 132 > Verses 132:15-27
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  • D&C 132:19: Seal. Note the use of the word "seal" in verse 19. Through the sealing ordinances of the temple, exaltation is sealed upon our heads. This is brought to complete fulfillment after individuals have proved faithful, and had their calling and election sealed upon their heads by the power of the holy priesthood. "The more sure word of prophecy means a man's knowing that he is sealed up unto eternal life, by revelation and the spirit of prophecy, through the power of the Holy Priesthood" (D&C 131:5).
A "fullness and a continuation of the seeds forever and ever" will be the glory given to those who are exalted. This glory is previously referenced as "my [God's] glory." Since God's glory is to bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of his children (Moses 1:39), it follows that the exalted who become gods and receive God's glory will be involved in bringing to pass the immortality and eternal life of their children, and will have the same relationship with their children that our Heavenly Father has with us.

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 132:19. What does it mean to "pass by the angels" to achieve exaltation?
  • D&C 132:19. How is exaltation "sealed upon [our] heads"?
  • D&C 132:19. How is the "continuation of the seeds" an eternal glory?
  • D&C 132:19. What does it mean that the sealing occurs "by him who is anointed, unto who I have appointed this power and the keys of the priesthood..."? Besides the Holy Spirit of promise, does this mean that a priesthood holder must seal the calling and election of the couple? If so, is this the Second Anointing or is that a separate ordinance?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 132:19-20. See a Joseph Fielding Smith quotation on "from everlasting to everlasting" (v 20) and a quote from Brigham Young on the temple related to verse 19 here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




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D&C 132:21-25

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Summary[edit]

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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 132:19: Seal. Note the use of the word "seal" in verse 19. Through the sealing ordinances of the temple, exaltation is sealed upon our heads. This is brought to complete fulfillment after individuals have proved faithful, and had their calling and election sealed upon their heads by the power of the holy priesthood. "The more sure word of prophecy means a man's knowing that he is sealed up unto eternal life, by revelation and the spirit of prophecy, through the power of the Holy Priesthood" (D&C 131:5).
A "fullness and a continuation of the seeds forever and ever" will be the glory given to those who are exalted. This glory is previously referenced as "my [God's] glory." Since God's glory is to bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of his children (Moses 1:39), it follows that the exalted who become gods and receive God's glory will be involved in bringing to pass the immortality and eternal life of their children, and will have the same relationship with their children that our Heavenly Father has with us.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 132:19. What does it mean to "pass by the angels" to achieve exaltation?
  • D&C 132:19. How is exaltation "sealed upon [our] heads"?
  • D&C 132:19. How is the "continuation of the seeds" an eternal glory?
  • D&C 132:19. What does it mean that the sealing occurs "by him who is anointed, unto who I have appointed this power and the keys of the priesthood..."? Besides the Holy Spirit of promise, does this mean that a priesthood holder must seal the calling and election of the couple? If so, is this the Second Anointing or is that a separate ordinance?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • D&C 132:19-20. See a Joseph Fielding Smith quotation on "from everlasting to everlasting" (v 20) and a quote from Brigham Young on the temple related to verse 19 here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.




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D&C 137:1-5

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  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 108
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Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

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Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • What is the textual and publishing history of this section? I understand that it was written in Joseph Smith's personal journal, but is that the same as the journals that later became the official history of the church?
  • What are the circumstances that led to the passage's canonization in 1976?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 137 is __.
  • D&C 137 was first published in __.
  • D&C 137 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 137:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 137.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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D&C 137:6-10

Home > Doctrine & Covenants > Section 137
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Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Historical setting[edit]

This heading should explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. This may include issues that prompted the section, its subsequent implementation, and the extent of circulation through its first inclusion in the Doctrine & Covenants. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 108
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 109

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Complete outline and page map[edit]

This heading contains an outline for the entire section. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of this section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • What is the textual and publishing history of this section? I understand that it was written in Joseph Smith's personal journal, but is that the same as the journals that later became the official history of the church?
  • What are the circumstances that led to the passage's canonization in 1976?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Previous editions.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 137 is __.
  • D&C 137 was first published in __.
  • D&C 137 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.
  • Changes to the text of D&C 137:

Related passages that interpret or shed light on D&C 137.

Doctrinal references cited on this page.

Historical references cited on this page.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous section: D&C 108                         Next section: D&C 109

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