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This page allows you to see in one place all the commentary pages for the reading assignment for this Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine lesson. Click on the heading to go to a specific page. Click the edit links below to edit text on any page.


Alma 26:21-25

The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapter 26

Previous (Alma 26:16-20)             Next (Alma 26:26-30)

Questions[edit]

  • Why does Ammon place repentance before faith in verse 22 (a seeming inversion of gospel principles)?
  • What does it mean to exercise faith? (Results of a search for this expression in the scriptures is here.)

Lexical notes[edit]

  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add lexical notes


Exegesis[edit]

Click the edit link above and to the right to add exegesis


Related links[edit]

  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add related links



Previous (Alma 26:16-20)             Next (Alma 26:26-30)

D&C 4:1-7

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 4

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: probably in January (but perhaps February) 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 3
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 5

In July 1828 Martin Harris lost the 116 page manuscript, and Joseph Smith was placed on probation. In September, Joseph again received the plates and the urim and thummim from Moroni. In October 1828 Joseph's parents came down from Manchester-Palmyra, New York to visit Joseph and Emma at Harmony, Pennsylvania, and they stayed for about three months until January 1829. D&C 4 was probably received, not in February, but in January shortly before Joseph's parents returned home.

For a brief overview of D&C 4 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 4 is given to Joseph Smith Sr., but the text is directed to "all ye who embark in the service of God" (D&C 4:2).


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Verse 4[edit]

  • The phrase "white already to harvest" is a reference to the same phrase in John 4:35. As noted in the lexical note there, the meaning of this phrase is "already white for harvest."


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Verse 1[edit]

  • What is the marvelous work that is about to come forth? The use of the word “about” suggests that, at the time this revelation was given (February 1829), it had not yet come forth. When do you think it either did or will? Notice that this verse is repeated in D&C 6:1, D&C 11:1, D&C 12:1, and D&C 14:1, and it is paraphrased in D&C 18:44. It also appears in the JST version of Isaiah 29:26 (=Isaiah 29:14), and it occurs regularly in the Book of Mormon (eight times). What does the word “marvelous” mean in this context?

Verse 2[edit]

Verse 3[edit]

  • How applicable is this verse? Is it true that everyone who has a desire to serve is called? It doesn't seem reasonable to suggest that desire is sufficient to be called to any of God's work no matter the type. (It isn't the case that having the desire to be called as the Bishop of one's ward or that having a desire to serve as a missionary when serious transgressions have been committed is sufficient—see the Elder Ballard talk below.) What then is meant here by "the work"?

Verse 4[edit]

  • Why is the work of the gospel often compared to reaping a field? How does the image in this section compare to other, related images in the scriptures? For example, how does it compare to the Parable of the Sower ( Mark 4:3-8) or the Parable of the Seed Growing Secretly ( Mark 4:26-29)? What does “salvation” mean in this verse? Doctrine and Covenants 88:15 says that the spirit and the body of man are the soul. Is that the definition that applies here? If so, what does this verse promise?

Verse 5[edit]

  • Why does this verse speak of both charity and love? In other scriptures, don’t the two mean the same? Are they distinct things here, or is the Lord repeating the same thing in different ways to emphasize it? What does it mean to have one’s eye single to the glory of God? When is my eye not single to his glory? Compare this qualification with the promise made in Doctrine and Covenants 88:67. What does the word “single” mean in this context? Compare this to Matthew 6:22 (Luke 11:34), where the Lord says that if our eye is single, then our whole body will be filled with light. Does “single” mean the same in both cases? The Greek word translated “single” in the New Testament could also be translated either “healthy” or “pure,” but it is difficult to understand what “pure to the glory of God” or “healthy to the glory of God” might mean. Does that mean that the passage in Matthew is irrelevant to explaining the meaning of this verse? Does Mormon 8:15 give us a definition of what “eye single to the glory of God” means, or does it give us an example of what it means?

Verse 6[edit]

  • Why do you think the Doctrine and Covenants implicitly refers to these verses in 2 Peter 1:5-9 so often? Look at this comparison of the two lists:
2 Peter D&C 4
faith faith
virtue virtue
knowledge knowledge
temperance temperance
patience patience
godliness brotherly kindness
charity charity
humility
diligence

What does that comparison tell us about the qualifications for the work and about the goal of the work? Do you see any significance in the change of order ("brotherly kindness” and “godliness” are reversed)? Why might “humility” and “diligence” have been added in the Doctrine and Covenants revelation?

Here are some alternate translations of the Greek words of 2 Peter:

virtue = excellence
knowledge = knowledge of what really is
temperance = self-discipline
patience = steadfastness, endurance
brotherly kindness = brotherly love
charity = love, good will.

Are any of these meanings also helpful in understanding the admonition of the Doctrine and Covenants?

Verse 7[edit]

  • How do you square this verse with the fact that all of us have had the experience of asking and not receiving what we asked for? What does it mean to knock and to have “it” opened? In other words, what is promised and how do we obtain that promise? The word “amen” means something like “so let it be” and signifies agreement. Why does a revelation from the Lord end with that word?


Relation to other scriptures[edit]

This heading is for notes about the relationship of this section to other sections and passages. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Related sections and chapters[edit]

  • Several sections addressed to Joseph Smith's early supporters share similar language beginning with "A great and marvelous work is about to come forth ..."
  • D&C 4 directed to Joseph Smith Sr. and D&C 11 to Hyrum Smith of Manchester-Palmyra, New York,
  • D&C 6 to Oliver Cowdery at Harmony, Pennsylvania,
  • D&C 12 to Joseph Knight Sr. of Colesville, New York, and
  • D&C 14 to David Whitmer of Fayette, New York.

This language is thus circulated to all four centers of activity in New York-Pennsylvania. But D&C 6:1-6 is repeated in the later sections almost word for word. And D&C 6 is placed closer to the front of the 1835 and 1844 editions of the Doctrine & Covenants than those other sections. So while D&C 4 is now much better known, it appears that the content of D&C 6 likely received greater emphasis in the early days of the Church than did these other sections.

Parallel passages[edit]

There has been no serious effort to make this list complete.


Text transmission and circulation[edit]

This heading is for notes about the history of the section and when it became widely known to the general church membership. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading.

  • The oldest surviving partial copy of D&C 4 is the one copied by John Whitmer into Revelation Book 1, p. 2-3, presumably during the summer of 1830. The oldest surviving complete copy is ______.
  • D&C 4 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.


Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Verse 3[edit]

  • Elder Ballard's talk "The Greatest Generation of Missionaries" in Oct. 2002 explains the bar for missionary service has been raised. Thus having a desire may not be sufficient in light of past transgression to be called as a full-time missionary.
"Please understand this: the bar that is the standard for missionary service is being raised. The day of the “repent and go” missionary is over. You know what I’m talking about, don’t you, my young brothers? Some young men have the mistaken idea that they can be involved in sinful behavior and then repent when they’re 18 1/2 so they can go on their mission at 19. While it is true that you can repent of sins, you may or you may not qualify to serve."


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 11:1-5

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 10:66-70)             Next (D&C 11:6-10)

Questions[edit]

Verse 5 - I understand what it means to ask and seek, but how do we "knock" to have things opened unto us? Is there any significance that "seek" was omitted in this verse, as well as in Sections 4,6,12 and 14, 2nd Nephi 32:4, 3 Nephi 27:29?

Lexical notes[edit]

  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add lexical notes


Exegesis[edit]

Click the edit link above and to the right to add exegesis


Related links[edit]

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Previous (D&C 10:66-70)             Next (D&C 11:6-10)

D&C 11:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 11:1-5)             Next (D&C 11:11-15)

Questions[edit]

  • Click the edit link above and to the right to add questions


Lexical notes[edit]

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Exegesis[edit]

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Related links[edit]

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D&C 11:11-15

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 11:6-10)             Next (D&C 11:16-20)

Questions[edit]

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Lexical notes[edit]

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Exegesis[edit]

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D&C 11:16-20

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 11:11-15)             Next (D&C 11:21-25)

Questions[edit]

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Lexical notes[edit]

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Exegesis[edit]

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Related links[edit]

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D&C 11:21-25

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 11:16-20)             Next (D&C 11:26-30)

Questions[edit]

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Lexical notes[edit]

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Exegesis[edit]

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Related links[edit]

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Previous (D&C 11:16-20)             Next (D&C 11:26-30)

D&C 11:26-30

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 11

Previous (D&C 11:21-25)             Next (D&C 12:1-5)

Questions[edit]

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Lexical notes[edit]

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Exegesis[edit]

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Related links[edit]

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D&C 12:6-9

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 12

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: late May 1829 at Harmony, Pennsylvania
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 11
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 14

Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery began translating the Book of Mormon at Harmony, Pennsylvania on April 7, 1829. The Aaronic Priesthood was restored by John the Baptist about six weeks later on May 15 as Joseph and Oliver continued translating at Harmony. Two weeks later, about the first of June, Joseph and Oliver left Harmony to escape rising persecution and moved to the Whitmer home at Fayette, New York, where they finished translating about the end of June, three months after they began.

Several significant church history events occurred in late May during Joseph and Oliver's last two weeks at Harmony. Incomplete records make it uncertain when many events occurred, but the following events may have occurred in about the following order. While there is room for reasonable disagreement regarding the "perhaps" items on this list, the list as a whole paints a picture of the general circumstances surrounding the receipt of D&C 11 and D&C 12.

• May 15, restoration of the Aaronic Priesthood by John the Baptist as recounted in D&C 13, translation perhaps at 3 Ne 11
• perhaps receipt of D&C 10:38-70 instructing Joseph to translate the small plates of Nephi in place of the lost 116 page manuscript
• perhaps restoration of the Melchizedek Priesthood by Peter, James and John during a trip between Harmony and Colesville
• May 25, baptism of Samuel Smith at Harmony
• Hyrum Smith visits Harmony from Palmyra, receipt of D&C 11
• Joseph Knight Sr. visits Harmony from Colesville, perhaps bringing provisions, receipt of D&C 12
• first of June, David Whitmer arrives at Harmony to carry Joseph and Oliver in his wagon to Fayette

For a brief overview of D&C 12 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 12 was given to Joseph Knight Sr. but is addressed to "all those who have desires to bring forth and to establish this work." (D&C 12:7).


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Relation to other scriptures[edit]

This heading is for notes about the relationship of this section to other sections and passages. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Related sections and chapters[edit]

Parallel passages[edit]

Text transmission and circulation[edit]

This heading is for notes about the history of the section and when it became widely known to the general church membership. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 12 is ______.
  • D&C 12 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.


Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 14:1-5

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 14

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: June 1829 at Fayette, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 12
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 15

Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery spent April and May 1829 translating at Harmony, Pennsylvania. But as persecution there intensified, Oliver wrote to David Whitmer requesting that he take Joseph and Oliver to the house of David's father at Fayette, New York to finish the translation. David Whitmer did so about the first of June, and the translation was completed at Fayette about the end of June 1829.

In the beginning of June, [David Whitmer], a son of Peter Whitmer [Sr.] of Fayette, Seneca, Co, NY, with whom I had formed an acquaintance shortly after commencing the translation, came to the place where we were living with a carriage to take us to his father's residence, there to remain until we should finish the work. He proposed to gratuitously give us our board and the assistance of one of his brothers to write, as well as his own when convenient. Having need of such timely aid, and being informed that the people of the neighborhood were anxious to enquire into these things, we accepted the invitation and accompanied him home [from Harmony to Fayette] where we remained until the translation was completed and [the] copyright secured.
In the meantime, David, John, and Peter Whitmer Jr., sons of Peter, became our zealous friends and assistants in the work. And being very anxious to know the will of the Lord concerning them, after much solicitation I inquired of the Lord through the Urim and Thummin and received the following revelations [D&C 14-16]

(Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 40-41).

For a brief overview of D&C 14-16 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Relation to other scriptures[edit]

This heading is for notes about the relationship of this section to other sections and passages. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Related sections and chapters[edit]

  • D&C 14, D&C 15, and D&C 16 were all received under the same circumstances in June 1829 and were directed to the three Whitmer brothers who played the most prominent role in bringing forth the Book of Mormon: David, John and Peter Jr.
  • D&C 30 contains a second set of three revelations to these same three brothers in late September 1830.

Parallel passages[edit]

Text transmission and circulation[edit]

This heading is for notes about the history of the section and when it became widely known to the general church membership. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 14 is _____.
  • D&C 14 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.


Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 14:6-11

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 14

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: June 1829 at Fayette, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 12
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 15

Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery spent April and May 1829 translating at Harmony, Pennsylvania. But as persecution there intensified, Oliver wrote to David Whitmer requesting that he take Joseph and Oliver to the house of David's father at Fayette, New York to finish the translation. David Whitmer did so about the first of June, and the translation was completed at Fayette about the end of June 1829.

In the beginning of June, [David Whitmer], a son of Peter Whitmer [Sr.] of Fayette, Seneca, Co, NY, with whom I had formed an acquaintance shortly after commencing the translation, came to the place where we were living with a carriage to take us to his father's residence, there to remain until we should finish the work. He proposed to gratuitously give us our board and the assistance of one of his brothers to write, as well as his own when convenient. Having need of such timely aid, and being informed that the people of the neighborhood were anxious to enquire into these things, we accepted the invitation and accompanied him home [from Harmony to Fayette] where we remained until the translation was completed and [the] copyright secured.
In the meantime, David, John, and Peter Whitmer Jr., sons of Peter, became our zealous friends and assistants in the work. And being very anxious to know the will of the Lord concerning them, after much solicitation I inquired of the Lord through the Urim and Thummin and received the following revelations [D&C 14-16]

(Manuscript History of the Church, Vol. A-1, p. 40-41).

For a brief overview of D&C 14-16 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 3 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 5.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Relation to other scriptures[edit]

This heading is for notes about the relationship of this section to other sections and passages. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Related sections and chapters[edit]

  • D&C 14, D&C 15, and D&C 16 were all received under the same circumstances in June 1829 and were directed to the three Whitmer brothers who played the most prominent role in bringing forth the Book of Mormon: David, John and Peter Jr.
  • D&C 30 contains a second set of three revelations to these same three brothers in late September 1830.

Parallel passages[edit]

Text transmission and circulation[edit]

This heading is for notes about the history of the section and when it became widely known to the general church membership. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 14 is _____.
  • D&C 14 was first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.


Resources[edit]

This heading is for listing links and print resources, including those cited in the notes. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 15:1-6

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 15

D&C 15 and D&C 16 were received under the same circumstances and their texts are identical, so there is no point in splitting the discussion of those two identical texts among two separate pages. Discussion of D&C 16 is therefore included here with D&C 15.

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

This heading should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Received: June 1829 at Fayette, New York
  • Prior section in chronological order: D&C 14
  • Next section in chronological order: D&C 18

The historical setting of D&C 15 and D&C 16 is the same as, and is therefore discussed with, D&C 14.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

The extra “unto” that appears in D&C 16:5 but not in D&C 15:5 is a later addition. The original text of the two sections is identical.


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

This heading is for unanswered questions and is an important part of the continual effort to improve this wiki. Please do not be shy, as even a basic or "stupid" question can identify things that need to be improved on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Relation to other scriptures[edit]

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Related sections and chapters[edit]

  • D&C 14, D&C 15, and D&C 16 were all received under the same circumstances in June 1829 and were directed to the three Whitmer brothers who played the most prominent role in bringing forth the Book of Mormon: David, John and Peter Jr.
  • D&C 30 contains a second set of three revelations to these same three brothers in late September 1830.

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Text transmission and circulation[edit]

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  • The oldest surviving copies of D&C 15 and D&C 16 are ______.
  • D&C 15 and D&C 16 were first published in the 1833 Book of Commandments, the earliest edition of what we now call the Doctrine & Covenants.


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D&C 18:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 18

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Verse 10[edit]

  • Anthony D. Perkins, "‘The Great and Wonderful Love’," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 76–78. Speaking to those who feel worthless, Elder Perkins counsels: "Refrain from repeatedly thinking or saying negative words about yourself—there is a clear difference between humility and humiliation. Identify and use your unique talents rather than dwelling on your weaknesses."



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D&C 18:11-15

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 18

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D&C 18:16-20

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 18

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What does it mean to "Contend against no church," in verse 20?

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D&C 31:1-5

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 31

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 30
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 32

For a brief overview of D&C 31 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.


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D&C 31 is addressed to __

D&C 31 can be outlined as follows:


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  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 31 is __.
  • D&C 31 was first published in __.
  • D&C 31 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.


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D&C 31:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 31

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 30
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 32

For a brief overview of D&C 31 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 31 is addressed to __

D&C 31 can be outlined as follows:


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Points to ponder[edit]

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I have a question[edit]

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Relation to other scriptures[edit]

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Related sections and chapters[edit]

Parallel passages[edit]

Text transmission and circulation[edit]

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  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 31 is __.
  • D&C 31 was first published in __.
  • D&C 31 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.


Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 31:11-13

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 31

This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Historical setting[edit]

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  • Received:
  • Prior section in chronological order D&C 30
  • Next section in chronological order D&C 32

For a brief overview of D&C 31 in historical relation to the rest of the Doctrine & Covenants, see Historical Overview of the Restoration Scriptures. For lengthier discussions of the historical setting, see Historical Context of the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 6 or Church History in the Fulness of Times, chapter 7.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be brief and may include an outline of the section. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

D&C 31 is addressed to __

D&C 31 can be outlined as follows:


Discussion[edit]

This heading is for more detailed discussions of all or part of a passage. Discussion may include the meaning of a particular word, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout the passage, insights to be developed in the future, and other items. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


Points to ponder[edit]

This heading is for prompts that suggest ways in which all or part of this passage can influence a person's life. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →


I have a question[edit]

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Relation to other scriptures[edit]

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Related sections and chapters[edit]

Parallel passages[edit]

Text transmission and circulation[edit]

This heading is for notes about the history of the text and when it became widely known to the general church membership. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading.

  • The oldest surviving copy of D&C 31 is __.
  • D&C 31 was first published in __.
  • D&C 31 was first included in the Doctrine & Covenants in the 18__ edition.


Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.


D&C 33:1-5

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 33

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Verses 3-4[edit]

  • If the field is white, in other words, ripe for harvest (verse 3) how can it also be that the vineyard has become completely corrupted (verse 4)?
  • Does “they” refer to the few who do good?
  • To whom does “all” refer? Everyone living, all priests, someone or something else?

Verse 5[edit]

  • What does it mean to say that the Church has been “called forth out of the wilderness"? The reference seems to be to the story of Moses and Israel. How is that story relevant?

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D&C 33:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 33

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D&C 33:11-15

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 33

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D&C 33:16-18

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 33

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D&C 42:11-15

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 42 > Verses 11-17
Previous page: Verses 1-10                      Next page: Verses 18-29

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Summary[edit]

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The relationship of verses 11-17 to the rest of section 42 is discussed at D&C 42.


Discussion[edit]

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  • Verse 12 is directed to the “elders, priests, and teachers.” Since verse 11 right before it is directed to the missionary effort of preaching the gospel, it is tempting to read verses 12-17 as simply talking about the same issue. However, it is important to note that D&C 20 and D&C 84 clearly state that teachers, one of the three groups addressed in verse 12, are to stay with the church and not travel. D&C 20 also explains that all three offices have a responsibility to teach in church meetings. Since at least one of the offices addressed in verse 12 is not assigned any missionary duties, and all three offices do have a responsibility to teach in their church meetings, it is possible at least to read verse 12 as dealing with teaching specifically in church meeting settings. With this setting in mind, verse 12 explains that their sermons should teach the “principles of the gospel” - faith, repentance, baptism, Holy Ghost - with the Bible and Book of Mormon as the source.
  • Verse 13 commands them to observe the “covenants and church articles.” This was a phrase commonly used to refer to section 20 of the Doctrine and Covenants, which recorded the duties these of elders, priests, and teachers. One of these duties listed in D&C 20 was to “conduct the meetings as [...] led by the Holy Ghost.” The remainder of verse 13 echoes this commandment by directing them to teach “as they shall be directed by the Spirit.”
  • Verse 14 continues the theme and explains this process further: “And the Spirit shall be given unto you by the prayer of faith.” Faith is necessary, as is the process of asking. Yet, verse 14 opens up the possibility that even with this the Spirit might not come. “If ye receive not the Spirit,” it says, “ye shall not teach.”
  • There are several ways of interpreting this direction to "not teach." One reading is to assume that if one does not have enough faith to receive the Spirit, then one should not teach until that faith is present. A second reading suggests that like the Saints mentioned in D&C 50, it is possible to mistake other powerful influences as being the Spirit. To avoid this, a teacher ought to pray for the power to teach and see if it is granted. Then one can know that the power being sought is of God (for example, it might be inappropriate to share a personal story or a phrase from a patriarchal blessing, even though the teacher knows it would draw the attention of the class. Praying first and receiving the Spirit would enable the teacher to proceed without concern). A third possible interpretation is that a teacher should be open to the Spirit directing them to do something other than teaching - perhaps spending the time praying, singing, exhorting, or conducting a conversation with class members (see Moroni 6:9).


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  • When do we know that we should not teach?
  • Why all this "until the fulness of my scriptures is given"?
  • What is the difference between teaching by the Spirit and speaking by the Comforter?


Resources[edit]

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  • A paper titled: "'To Teach or Not to Teach': Three Possible Interpretations of D&C 42:12-14" presented at the Embracing the Law seminar conference, is available in podcast form at mormontheologyseminar.org[1]
  • Blog post[2] analyzing verses 12-14 and applying this to teaching Young Womens
  • See discussion on these verses by participants in a Mormon Theology Seminar project at Embracingthelaw.wordpress.com [3]


Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.




Previous page: Verses 1-10                      Next page: Verses 18-29

D&C 52:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 52

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D&C 75:1-5

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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D&C 75:6-10

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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D&C 75:11-15

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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D&C 75:16-20

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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D&C 75:21-25

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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  • v. 21: Is it alright to find this verse a bit odd, if not comical? Is the first statement given as a command, or as a prophecy? Why would condemning and judging a house at the day of judgment bring joy and gladness? What might be learned from this, as I see it, strange verse?

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D&C 75:26-30

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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  • v. 28: "every man who is obliged to provide for his own family," what does obliged mean here? Is this to be understood as a moral obligation? did the word obliged imply the same sense of being forced to do something in 1832 as it does today? There is probably in the final analysis not too much to read into here, but I find the phrasing interesting. Is it that the forceful "obliged" is used so that men with callings in the church cannot use their family duties as an excuse to not labor in the church? Because the (indirectly given) imperative after the phrase is dual, that one should let him provide, and let him labor in the church.

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D&C 75:31-36

Doctrine & Covenants > Section 75

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