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Alma 53:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 53:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 53:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 53:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 53:21-23

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 54:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 54:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 54:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 54:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 54:21-24

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 55:31-35

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 52-55
Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 52-55 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story.

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 52-55 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:6: Land of Nephi. As we can see from this verse the land of Nephi is more than simply the name of the geographic area that the Lamanites possessed. The name the Nephites use for the land the Lamanites live in reminds them of their dispute with the Lamanites over land. As Moroni saw it, and likely other Nephites as well, that land rightfully belonged to them. Consistent with this interpretation, the name "land of Nephi" is not used in the Book of Mormon after the coming of Christ, when the Nephites and Lamanites live as one people.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni tells us that he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle." If we read Moroni's epistle closely we see that he never explicitly makes Ammoron withdrawing his purpose conditional on exchanging prisoners. We might assume then that when Moroni says he won't exchange prisoners unless Ammoron withdraws his purpose "as I have stated in my epistle" what Moroni means my "as I have stated" is that Ammoron needs to withdraw as he stated--not that it is conditional exchange as he stated.
  • Alma 55:2. Moroni doesn't come off as very dimplomatic in this section but rather a bit hot headed--even to the point of his anger getting in the way of executing on his intentions. Remember that Moroni was actually very happy to exchange prisoners and worked to get a good deal and then got the deal he wanted. This may be a good section to look at what Mormon's view of Moroni is. It is interesting to me that Mormon shows both Moroni's strengths and his weaknesses. It would have been easy enough for Mormon to have left out these details that show Moroni's weaknesses.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 54:1: Why does Mormon include this incident about prisoner exchange in his account? Is there a lesson of importance here for modern readers, or is this just part of a story?
  • Alma 54:2: It is easy to see Moroni as happy to exchange prisoners, but why would he "rejoice exceedingly"? Is there something more going on here?
  • Alma 54:2: Why would they exchange prisoners that would just become more enemy soldiers to fight?
  • Alma 54:3: Why would the Lamanites take women and children as prisoners, but the Nephites only took men?
  • Alma 54:5: If Moroni wants to exchange prisoners, why would he write an epistle that can only make Ammoron mad?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni bother preaching to Ammoron?
  • Alma 54:6: Why would Moroni tell Ammoron, a Nephite defector, to withdraw to "your own lands, or the land of your possessions" which he and his brother had taken over from the Lamanites? Why doesn't Moroni condemn his having taken the Lamanite lands as well?
  • Alma 54:7: Why would Moroni indicate that Ammoron could escape hell by repenting, if he really was a murderer?
  • Alma 55:3: If Moroni is clearly angry (vs. 1) and promises to "seek death among [the Lamanites]" why does he then try to take back the prisoners without shedding blood?
  • Alma 55:4: Is it just a coincidence that the Lamanite that Moroni finds is called Laman?
  • Alma 55:5: Is it just a coincidence that the former servant of the king would have been named Laman, since this was the traditional name of Lamanite kings?
  • Alma 55:6: Who are the men that go with Laman? Are they Moroni's men or Laman's men? If they were cultural or ethnic Nephites, wouldn't they have aroused suspicion on this mission?
  • Alma 55:8: Does Laman go alone to the meet with the guards?
  • Alma 55:10: Apparently, Lamanites used alcohol to help them get through battle. Can we see similarities in how some modern soldiers use alcohol, drugs, and steroids to help them in battle?
  • Alma 55:13: Why were the Lamanites apparently so easily tricked into becoming drunk on Nephite wine? How does this episode compare with Alma 55:30?
  • Alma 55:19: What does this verse tell us about the Moroni's character?
  • Alma 55:19: Why would Moroni be concerned about "bring[ing] upon him injustice" if he were to kill the Lamanites in their drunkeness?
  • Alma 55:21: How far is a pace? Is this a literal term of measurement, or a figure of speech?
  • Alma 52:1-5: Why does Mormon go to great pains to let us know that Amalickiah was killed on the very first day of the Nephite new year?
  • Alma 53:1: Where there no cultural or priesthood requirements for the burial of Nephites who died?
  • Alma 53:1: How does using prisoners of war for labor differ from modern rules of warfare?
  • Alma 53:2: Who was living in Mulek when Lehi took it over? Were there any descendants of the Mulekites?
  • Alma 53:2: What does it mean that Moroni and Lehi were "beloved by all the people of Nephi"? What source does Mormon have for this statement?
  • Alma 53:3: In what circumstances should we try to get our enemies to do work for us?
  • Alma 53:4: Was there a bridge and a gate? How were these not weak spots for the defense of the city?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Throughout the war chapters, there are many instances in which the Nephites trick the Lamanites,whether it be in taking over cities or freeing prisoners. See User:Jaromhansen's comments related to the Nephites deceiving the Lamanites here.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 49-51                      Next page: Chapters 56-58

Alma 56:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:31-35

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:36-40

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:41-45

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:46-50

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 56:51-57

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 57:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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Alma 57:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 57:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 57:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 57:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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Alma 57:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 57:31-36

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:31-35

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 58:36-41

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 56-58
Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 56-58 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 56-58 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 56-58 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 58:11: Insomuch and assurances. The OED defines the phrase "insomuch that" as meaning "to such an extent that, so that" (definition 3, designated "the most usual construction"). It seems that, in this case, "insomuch" is modifying the phrase "God did visit us with assurances," rather than the phrase that is more proximate ("that he would deliver us"). If this is indeed the case, then it would seem that insomuch casts the phrase "he did speak peace" as a kind of intensification of the "visit us with assurances" phrase. It is not clear, however, whether the following phrases, ("and did grant unto us great faith, and did cause . . . ") should be read under the sway of the "insomuch." These later phrases could, it seems, be read as further modifying the "did visit us with assurances" phrase, parallel to the phrase "he did speak to our souls"; or they could be read as statements that are distinct and relatively independent of the "visit us with assurances" and "he did speak peace" phrases. The theological implications of these various readings will be explored below in the "Exegesis" section.
Helaman's thoughts might borrow from Deut. 28 (esp. verses 66-68), where the Lord issues a harrowing warning that if Israel does not follow him then it will "have none assurance of thy life."
The word "insomuch" might indicate that what follows the semicolon elaborates what precedes. In this case, the "assurances" are mentioned briefly, then expounded as coming in the form of: "speak[ing] peace to our souls", followed by the granting of "great faith" in that intangible assurance, the result of which was a "hope for...deliverance." The pattern is: prompting → faith → hope. Alternatively, "insomuch" could indicate that peace, faith, and hope came as a result of the unspecified assurances they received. The way we read this also has implications for how we understand the progression of verbs: speak → grant → cause. A similar pattern might be profitably considered in light of its occurrence elsewhere—for example, in Alma 32 the word is first given (cf. 32:6, 14, etc., parallel to "speak" here), then faith comes subsequently (cf. 32:16), and finally a change is "caused" by the negative space of non-knowledge generated by the word and faith (cf. 32:18-19).
  • Alma 58:13. Based on the limited geography in Alma_16:6-7, a narrow strip of wilderness, which marks the Nephite-Lamanite border, lies just south of the city of Manti. Thus, Helaman stationed his army in between Manti and Lamanite territory.
  • Alma 58:18. By retreating into the wilderness, Helaman's army was heading further south; i.e., crossing into Lamanite territory (see note in verse 13). This would undoubtedly appear foolish from the perspective of the Lamanite army in Manti.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 56:6-10: Why were the People of Ammon willing to break their covenant with the Lord?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why would the People of Ammon allow their sons to defend their country by taking up their weapons of war (vs. 5), rather than teach their children to make the same covenants against raising arms that they had made?
  • Alma 56:6-10: Why is Helaman willing to lead the two thousand sons of the People of Ammon, while he would "not suffer" the People of Ammon to take up arms?
  • Alma 56:12: How would the Lamanites have known who were the chief captains? Were the captains perhaps dressed differently?
  • Alma 57:6: Helaman tells us that sixty of the sons of the Ammonites joined the 2000 stripling warriors. Though we more often talk about the 2000 stripling warriors, the service these sixty young men gave was no less appreciated. Their faith was the same, and they were equally protected. These 60 young men provide a great example to us to always remember that it is not too late to begin to "fight" for the Lord. Like these 60, we may not get the same attention as the 2000 stripling warriors, but if we fight valiantly, the Lord will still watch over us and bless us equally.
  • Alma 57:21: I believe we learn the reason here that the stripling warriors were spared. They put their trust in God and they followed the orders of Helaman with exactness. Helaman was a just and faithful man and God led him. They all had great faith.
  • Alma 57:26-30: Why was ever single stripling warrior spared in every battle while many other righteous and faithful soldiers were not? What does the author tell us about these soldiers that distinguishes them from other soldiers by way of suggesting an answer to this question?
  • Here you have an entire group described as all obeying every command with exactness. One of the main points of the war chapters is Alma is that dissension can deprive a group of divine protection. The stripling warriors are described as being of one identical mind with regard to obedience.
  • Alma 58:13: Assurances. What form did the "assurances" take? Were they personal spiritual promptings given to individuals or outward evidences that a group of people would recognize?
  • Alma 58:13: Speak peace. Was "speaking peace" the type of assurance they received, or was it the result of those assurances?

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 52-55                      Next page: Chapters 59-63

Alma 59:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 59:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 59:11-13

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 60:31-36

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 61:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 61:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 61:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 61:16-21

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:11-15

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



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Alma 62:16-20

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:21-25

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:26-30

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:31-35

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:36-40

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:41-45

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 62:46-52

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 63:1-5

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 63:6-10

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

Alma 63:11-17

Home > The Book of Mormon > Alma > Chapters 59-63
Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma


This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This heading should be very brief. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Relationship to Alma. The relationship of Chapters 59-63 to the rest of Alma is discussed at Alma.

Story. Chapters 59-63 consists of ___ major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Chapters 59-63 include:

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 62:14-16: Take. This passage employs three different definitions of the word "take."
  • Alma 62:41. This verse tells us that because of the war many were softened. Interestingly, Mormon points out that it was not the war directly that resulted in softening people. But rather, the war caused afflictions and afflictions caused people to soften. In contrast Mormon says that because of the war many were hardened without identifying any intermediate causes. It isn't clear from the context exactly Mormon means by hardened and softened but it is clear that hardened is negative while softened is positive. Hardened could mean that their heart was hardened, that they were proud, or that they were unfeeling.

Unanswered questions[edit]

This section is for questions along the lines of "I still don't understand ..." Please do not be shy. The point of these questions is to identify things that still need to be addressed on this page. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Prompts for life application[edit]

This section is for prompts that suggest ways in which a passage can influence a person's life. Prompts may be appropriate either for private self reflection or for a class discussion. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 61:9: Choosing to not be offended. David A. Bednar, "And Nothing Shall Offend Them," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 89–92. Elder Bednar said: "Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately. ... One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, 'it mattereth not'" (emphasis added).

Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

  • Alma 60:1: Governor. The Nephites also refer to their chief judge a "governor" (see Alma 2:16)? What is the difference between a king and a governor?
  • Alma 61:14: Resist evil. How should we view Pahoran's exhortation to "resist evil" in light of the Savior's teaching to "resist not evil" (Matt 5:39)? Do Christ's teachings during his mortal ministry constitute a "higher law" than the Nephites were currently living in respect to dealing with their enemies?
  • Alma 62:44: Regulation. What is the meaning of the word regulation in this context? (See also verse 47)

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the link above and to the right to edit or add content to this heading. →

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.



Previous page: Chapters 56-58                      This is the last page for Alma

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