Luke

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Home > The New Testament > Luke

Subpages: Chapters 1-4a  •  Chapters 4b-9a  •  Chapters 9b-19  •  Chapters 20-24

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This page would ideally always be under construction. You are invited to contribute.


Summary[edit]

This section should be very brief. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Relationship to New Testament. The relationship of Luke to the New Testament as a whole is discussed at ____. The similarities and differences among the four gospels (and Acts) are discussed at ____.

Story. Luke consists of four major sections:

Message. Themes, symbols, and doctrinal points emphasized in Luke include:

Historical setting[edit]

This section should be brief and explain facts about the historical setting that will help a reader to understand the book. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Author: Luke.

Audience. The Gospel of Luke is widely thought to have been written for an audience of Greeks. A comparison of the apparent intended audiences of each of the four gospels is treated at --page--.

Setting. The historical background setting of the four gospels is treated at --page--.

Chronology. A joint chronology of the four gospels is treated at --page--.

Discussion[edit]

This section is for detailed discussion such as the meaning of a symbol, how a doctrinal point is developed throughout a passage, or insights that can be further developed in the future. Contributions may range from polished paragraphs down to a single bullet point. The focus, however, should always be on understanding the scriptural text consistent with LDS doctrine. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Outline and page map[edit]

This section contains an outline for the entire book. Items in blue or purple text indicate hyperlinked pages that address specific portions of the book. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

● Greeting to Theophilus (1:1-4)

I. Preparation for public ministry (Chapters 1-4a)

A. annunciation of John's birth (1:5-25)
A. annunciation of Jesus's birth (1:26-38)
B. Mary visits Elizabeth (1:39-56)
C. birth of John (1:57-80)
C. birth of Jesus (2:1-21)
D. Jesus presented at the temple (2:22-40)
D. Jesus about his Father's business at the temple (2:41-52)
E. John's mission (3:1-20)
E. Jesus's mission (3:18-4:15)


II. Galilean ministry (Chapters 4b-9a)

A. miracles (4:15-5:11)
B. relation to religious institutions (5:12-6:11)
C. preaching to multitude (6:12-49)
D. healing of non-Jew Cornelius's son (7:1-17)
C. relation to ____ (7:18-50)
A. miracles (8:22-56)

? ____ (9:1-48)


III.Journey to Jerusalem (Chapters 9b-19)


IV. Jerusalem and the Passion (Chapters 20-24)

four trials (22:54-23:5)
death and burial (23:26-56)
resurrection (24:1-53)

Unanswered questions[edit]

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Prompts for life application[edit]

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Prompts for further study[edit]

This section is for prompts that invite us to think about a passage more deeply or in a new way. These are not necessarily questions that beg for answers, but rather prompts along the lines of "Have you ever thought about ..." Prompts are most helpful when they are developed individually, thoughtfully, and with enough background information to clearly indicate a particular direction for further study or thought. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Resources[edit]

This section is for listing links and print resources, including those that are also cited elsewhere on this page. A short comment about the particular strengths of a resource can be helpful. Click the "edit" link to edit or add content to this section. →

Translations and Lexicons.

Related passages that interpret or shed light on Luke.

  • The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to 690, or 60%, of the 1,151 verses in Luke. With so many changes, readers just have to constantly consult the Joseph Smith Translation. Most significant changes are incorporated into the LDS edition of the Bible. All changes are noted in Wayment's Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible.[1]

References cited on this page.

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources.

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves (such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word). In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources (such as Strong's Bible Concordance or the Joseph Smith Papers) are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 144-223.


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