1 Pet 1:1-5:14

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Historical setting[edit]

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  • 1 Pet 3:13. First, the KJV relies on a text that is considered inaccurate. Contemporary scholars believe that the original text probably said "Who is going to harm you if you are zealous for the good?"
Second, in the manuscripts on which the translators of the KJV relied, the word translated "followers" (mimaetai) means literally "imitators." Who will harm you if you are imitators of the good?"
However we read verse 13, whether according to the Greek manuscripts relied on by the KJV translators or those preferred by contemporary scholars, it is important to recognize the connection of verse 13 to verse 18. Verse 18 asks, rhetorically, who can harm us if we imitate what is good or if we are zealous for what is good? Verse 17 tells us that Christ suffered for sin unjustly: he was harmed unjustly--and, of course, we know that he was ultimately exalted to the right hand of the Father as a result of that suffering. So when verse 13 speaks of imitating the good (or being zealous for it), the good in question is Jesus Christ: who can harm us if we imitate him? Temporally, Satan and anyone else who is unjust. Ultimately, no one.

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Points to ponder[edit]

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Resources[edit]

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Translations[edit]

  • Amplified • The Amplified Bible, 1987 update
  • NASB • New American Standard Bible, 1995 update
  • NIV • New International Version
  • NRSV • New Revised Standard Version
  • RSV • Revised Standard Version

Joseph Smith Translation[edit]

The Joseph Smith Translation made changes to the following verses in 1 Peter. This list is complete:[1]

  • 1 Pet 1:9-11
  • 1 Pet 2:7-8, 12
  • 1 Pet 3:1-5, 14-16, 18-20
  • 1 Pet 4:1-4, 6-8, 11, 13

Cited references[edit]

  • Wayment, Thomas A., ed. The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 2005. (ISBN 1590384393) BX8630 .A2 2005.

Other resources[edit]

  • 1 Pet 2:9. Paul B. Pieper, "The First Generation," Ensign, Nov 2006, pp. 11–13. Elder Pieper commends those who are the first to join the church from among their family. "By being the first in your family to accept the gospel, you become the first generation, a chosen generation through which generations past, present, and future may be blessed."

Notes[edit]

Footnotes are not required but are encouraged for factual assertions that average readers cannot easily evaluate for themselves, such as the date of King Solomon’s death or the nuanced definition of a Greek word. In contrast, insights rarely benefit from footnoting, and the focus of this page should always remain on the scriptures themselves rather than what someone has said about them. Links are actively encouraged on all sections of this page, and links to authoritative sources are preferable to footnotes.

  1. Wayment, The Complete Joseph Smith Translation of the New Testament, p. 304-07.



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